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Choke on the Magic
Banned
(05-28-2013, 01:41 PM)
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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/0...n_3344222.html

WASHINGTON/CANBERRA, May 27 (Reuters) - Designs for more than two dozen major U.S. weapons systems have been compromised by Chinese hackers, a U.S report said on Monday, as a news report in Australia said Chinese hackers had stolen the blueprints for Australia's new spy headquarters.



Citing a report prepared for the Defense Department by the Defense Science Board, the Washington Post reported that compromised U.S. designs included combat aircraft and ships, as well as missile defenses vital for Europe, Asia and the Gulf.



Among the weapons listed in the report were the advanced Patriot missile system, the Navy's Aegis ballistic missile defense systems, the F/A-18 fighter jet, the V-22 Osprey, the Black Hawk helicopter and the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter.



The report did not specify the extent or time of the cyber-thefts or indicate if they involved computer networks of the U.S. government, contractors or subcontractors.



But the espionage would give China knowledge that could be exploited in a conflict, such as knocking out communications and corrupting data, the Post said. It also could speed Beijing's development of Chinese defense technology.



In a report to Congress earlier this month, the Pentagon said China was using espionage to modernize its military and that its hacking was a serious concern. It said the U.S. government had been the target of hacking that appeared to be "attributable directly to the Chinese government and military." China dismissed the report as groundless.



China has dismissed as groundless both the Pentagon report and a February report by the U.S. computer security company Mandiant, which said a secretive Chinese military unit was probably behind a series of hacking attacks targeting the United States that had stolen data from 100 companies.



So yeah, Chinese hacking the US threads are nothing new. I found a thread from 2009 reporting on data from the F-35 being hacked from China. It just raises the question of why is sensitive military data/plans being placed on systems that are that easily compromised? Instead we accuse China and they say nope nothing to see here. There's obviously nothing the US government can actually do to China so why not just remove the problem of sensitive materials in digital form?
Vagabundo
Member
(05-28-2013, 01:47 PM)
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Meus Renaissance
Junior Member
(05-28-2013, 01:48 PM)
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Originally Posted by Choke on the Magic

So yeah, Chinese hacking the US threads are nothing new. I found a thread from 2009 reporting on data from the F-35 being hacked from China. It just raises the question of why is sensitive military data/plans being placed on systems that are that easily compromised? Instead we accuse China and they say nope nothing to see here. There's obviously nothing the US government can actually do to China so why not just remove the problem of sensitive materials in digital form?

'Easy' is subjective. The Chinese have long been accused of hacking into "secure" military networks to obtain information of this nature. I remember seeing a documentary where it was stated that some systems see millions of attempts on a daily basis to penetrate them.

I imagine high-level state secrets are not digitised, however; the sort of stuff only a handful of people know about
TacticalFox88
Lives in a Tom Clancy novel
(05-28-2013, 01:50 PM)
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Originally Posted by Jason Raize '75 - '04

'Easy' is subjective. The Chinese have long been accused of hacking into "secure" military networks to obtain information of this nature. I remember seeing a documentary where it was stated that some systems see millions of attempts on a daily basis to penetrate them.

I imagine high-level state secrets are not digitised, however; the sort of stuff only a handful of people know about

High-level state secrets ARE digitized it's just that the information is more encrypted than every single bank on the planet combined.

Fun fact: If you wanted to hack the entire military network of the United States, you'd have to use a supercomputer and wait for it to process and go through all the firewalls....in 30 years.
Savitar
Member
(05-28-2013, 01:51 PM)
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A lot of the hacking attempts are stuff that's absurd but happens, like a person in a high security field pulls into his place of work when he spots something on the ground. A memory card! Picking it up, takes it into his office and puts it into his computer to see what's on there not realizing it has a program on it to get whats on the computer. Yes that sort of thing happens. Lots of stuff gets out due to simple human error or stupidity to begin with.
ThoseDeafMutes
Very good! Keep thrusting!
(05-28-2013, 01:51 PM)
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Originally Posted by Choke on the Magic

It just raises the question of why is sensitive military data/plans being placed on systems that are that easily compromised?

Unless you know specifically how the information was obtained, you can't conclude that it was "easily" compromised. Technological espionage like this may well be integrating not only network based attacks but conventional spywork as well. Obtaining physical access to systems makes getting network access a lot simpler, either directly or indirectly. Bribing people on the inside makes things simpler. You get the idea.
Tamanon
Professional Bastard
(05-28-2013, 02:11 PM)
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Also, the designs and such most likely weren't taken from the Government but one of the manufacturers. I can pretty much guarantee human error or malfeasance was at fault.
shira
Member
(05-28-2013, 02:37 PM)
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Just do what the movie/games industry does and have fake files that troll you when you get to a certain point.

Hero_of_the_Day
Member
(05-28-2013, 02:43 PM)
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They need to put insane plans in there to freak the Chinese the fuck out.




Then they'd know we're not fucking around.
Last edited by Hero_of_the_Day; 05-28-2013 at 02:46 PM.
CharlieDigital
Has No Sense Of Humor
(05-28-2013, 02:44 PM)
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Originally Posted by TacticalFox88

Fun fact: If you wanted to hack the entire military network of the United States, you'd have to use a supercomputer and wait for it to process and go through all the firewalls....in 30 years.

This is only relevant if one assumes a brute force method of hacking into a network.

Originally Posted by ThoseDeafMutes

Unless you know specifically how the information was obtained, you can't conclude that it was "easily" compromised. Technological espionage like this may well be integrating not only network based attacks but conventional spywork as well. Obtaining physical access to systems makes getting network access a lot simpler, either directly or indirectly. Bribing people on the inside makes things simpler. You get the idea.

Originally Posted by Tamanon

Also, the designs and such most likely weren't taken from the Government but one of the manufacturers. I can pretty much guarantee human error or malfeasance was at fault.

Exactly. Such systems can be compromised from the inside by a spy who gains high level access (which has occurred) or by an individual who has been paid a handsome sum in exchange for his or her level of access or through various methods of social engineering. "Hacking" isn't limited to just intrusions via virtual channels.

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