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fredrancour
Member
(10-25-2014, 02:43 AM)

Originally Posted by Letterbomb

The way the first post is set up makes it seem like you should always try for a literary agent/publisher first, and then self-publish if no bites. is that right, or am I making false inferences? Do we have a general pros and cons list for either approach?

Probably the biggest hurdle for me right now is world building. When I sit down and start figuring out this and that, I quickly start to realize that this universe I'm building is extremely similar to another one already out there. It makes me feel unoriginal and uncreative, and that takes out the motivation to continue with that world idea. I start tweaking things here and there, and pretty soon the result is completely different from the original concept.

World building in general is a rather daunting task. What checklist of sorts exist for me to compare mine to in making sure it's complete? I don't want to write my story without my world being built. What are the essentials? At what point can I deem my world build enough to start writing? Probably more important, what elements are necessary to give the reader an easier time believing and immersing themselves into that world in the first place?

I can scribble land structures on a piece of paper and start naming continents and countries, but then I quickly start thinking, "Well this is too random now." I can carefully plug in different shapes and sizes, but then I quickly start thinking, "Well this is too structured now." I seem to always have a reason to be displeased with my result whenever I try to make progress, and I think that's the biggest challenge for me as of right now. What can I do to overcome this?

Regarding publishing: Self-promotion sounds like the most exhausting thing imaginable and I cannot imagine making a serious attempt at self-publishing because of it.

Perhaps Cyan can remember a writing excuses episode on the subject? I know they revisit this idea every few years as the markets change, but the most recent I can remember basically said, "Even the self-publishing success stories usually take their existing fan base as a marketing tool to get themselves publishing contracts." IDK if that still holds true. The overwhelming extent to which self-promotion feels alien to me means that I don't follow self-publishing and will continue to target real publishing unless every publishing house on earth shrivels up and dies.


Regarding worldbuilding: You can craft a story as soon as a clear conflict exists. "Here is a map, and a list of major locations on it, and a couple major historical events in the general area" doesn't help if you're still left with a central question of "Who gives a fuck about any of these details?" I DON'T mean "Why does the hypothetical reader care what I'm writing?" I mean, "What things exist in here that somebody might care about enough to take action based on?"

If your worldbulding feels too high-level to immediately lend itself to a story, zoom in. What is life like for certain people? Maybe there's a drought, so people start doing violent shit to survive. You can make a story out of people doing appalling things that they regret, or out of people fleeing the area while evading the harsh BS perpetrated by others.

All the tiny details can make a story a billion times better, with extra subtext or subplots or slowly-crescendoing megaplots across a lengthy series of novels, but all you actually need is people who care about things, and the people who have reason to object to those desires. You may not even think of the coolest things that could exist in a setting until you start writing a story in it and run into the opportunity at "street level."
MC Safety
Member
(10-25-2014, 02:44 AM)
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Originally Posted by Letterbomb

The way the first post is set up makes it seem like you should always try for a literary agent/publisher first, and then self-publish if no bites. is that right, or am I making false inferences? Do we have a general pros and cons list for either approach?

As a published writer, I've never compromised. I get paid for each and every piece I write. As Harlan Ellison indelicately noted, I don't take a piss without getting paid.

If I write a novel, I do it for myself with the intent to sell the work.

Vanity press is fine, but I would never pay to self-publish.
Last edited by MC Safety; 10-25-2014 at 03:00 AM. Reason: Oops. I don't take A piss. Man...
fredrancour
Member
(10-25-2014, 02:49 AM)

Originally Posted by MC Safety

As a published writer, I've never compromised. I get paid for each and every piece I write. As Harlan Ellison indelicately noted, I don't take piss without getting paid.

If I write a novel, I do it for myself with the intent to sell the work.

Vanity press is fine, but I would never pay to self-publish.

Self-publishiing currently means putting your works on e-book services though. It's not like paying some fraudulent bookseller money out of your own pocket to churn out thousands of books that may never even find space in a book store.

How much investment is involved in getting a book up on Amazon and whatever other e-book services exist?
toddhunter
Member
(10-25-2014, 03:22 AM)
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Originally Posted by fredrancour

How much investment is involved in getting a book up on Amazon and whatever other e-book services exist?

Not a lot.

I think it comes down to your goals. Personally I have a job doing "computer stuff" to earn money and I know I'll never be good enough to write something real (or at least reach the point where I am not better off just doing more "computer stuff").
But that is ok, because via the ebook sites, there is at least a little piece of me out there in the world for after I depart. This motivates me to not only get things finished, but to also put as much of myself into each thing I write as I can.

The best of both worlds is to be famous enough to write what you want and have people line up to buy it as well.

One can dream :)
Timu
Member
(10-25-2014, 03:27 AM)
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Has anyone used Lulu to publish their novels?=O
AngmarsKing701
Member
(10-25-2014, 03:28 AM)
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Originally Posted by toddhunter

Not a lot.

I think it comes down to your goals. Personally I have a job doing "computer stuff" to earn money and I know I'll never be good enough to write something real (or at least reach the point where I am not better off just doing more "computer stuff").
But that is ok, because via the ebook sites, there is at least a little piece of me out there in the world for after I depart. This motivates me to not only get things finished, but to also put as much of myself into each thing I write as I can.

The best of both worlds is to be famous enough to write what you want and have people line up to buy it as well.

One can dream :)

This is a perfect post. 100% true for me as well, even down to the computer stuff.
Mike M
Nick N
(10-25-2014, 04:26 AM)
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Originally Posted by toddhunter

Not a lot.

I think it comes down to your goals. Personally I have a job doing "computer stuff" to earn money and I know I'll never be good enough to write something real (or at least reach the point where I am not better off just doing more "computer stuff").
But that is ok, because via the ebook sites, there is at least a little piece of me out there in the world for after I depart. This motivates me to not only get things finished, but to also put as much of myself into each thing I write as I can.

The best of both worlds is to be famous enough to write what you want and have people line up to buy it as well.

One can dream :)

Originally Posted by AngmarsKing701

This is a perfect post. 100% true for me as well, even down to the computer stuff.

While I usually pride myself on my pragmatism, I buy the hype when people tell me that I'm good enough to get published if I push hard enough because the dream of being a professional writer allows me to compartmentalize the knowledge that I don't actually like my career that much and have limited prospects D :
toddhunter
Member
(10-25-2014, 04:45 AM)
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Originally Posted by Mike M

While I usually pride myself on my pragmatism, I buy the hype when people tell me that I'm good enough to get published if I push hard enough

If you can't do it, I don't think many of us have any hope.

So hurry up and do it :P
Ashes
Member
(10-25-2014, 06:55 AM)
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I stopped sending stuff out a while ago now. Accumulation of rejection letters just taught me that I am not good enough for the market I want to be in. Hundreds and hundreds of rejections.
I have enough data to show that it isn't realistic for me to expect a career here.
Still, I'm writing into my 'retirement.' I'm bound to hit gold by sheer dumb luck more than anything.
I'll stop when it stops being fun. :p
Tim the Wiz
gifted eyebrows
(10-25-2014, 08:21 AM)
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Originally Posted by Ashes

I stopped sending stuff out a while ago now. Accumulation of rejection letters just taught me that I am not good enough for the market I want to be in. Hundreds and hundreds of rejections.
I have enough data to show that it isn't realistic for me to expect a career here.
Still, I'm writing into my 'retirement.' I'm bound to hit gold by sheer dumb luck more than anything.
I'll stop when it stops being fun. :p

Wait--are you counting each story that got rejected in the market or a cumulative number of all the rejections for every story? Besides, plenty of great authors just weren't meant for the short story format.
Ashes
Member
(10-25-2014, 08:37 AM)
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Originally Posted by Tim the Wiz

Wait--are you counting each story that got rejected in the market or a cumulative number of all the rejections for every story? Besides, plenty of great authors just weren't meant for the short story format.

Just letters. They add up over six, seven years. Threw them away in a spring clean. Not sure why I kept them.

I was talking about novels.

Anyways, I was just thinking, come January I'm likely to change my mind.
Elfforkusu
Member
(10-25-2014, 08:42 AM)
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Ctrl+F draft2digital.com. No results found!

So... for those of you who don't know about d2d, it's basically exactly like SmashWords, but in an alternate universe where SmashWords didn't suck.

Originally Posted by MC Safety

As a published writer, I've never compromised. I get paid for each and every piece I write. As Harlan Ellison indelicately noted, I don't take a piss without getting paid.

If I write a novel, I do it for myself with the intent to sell the work.

Vanity press is fine, but I would never pay to self-publish.

... well, the landscape looks a lot different than it used to. You don't ever pay to e-publish, unless you're really awful at formatting your own book.

I'd love to be published properly, but realistically ... what I need isn't a publisher, it's a marketer.
Last edited by Elfforkusu; 10-25-2014 at 08:46 AM.
Tim the Wiz
gifted eyebrows
(10-25-2014, 10:57 AM)
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Originally Posted by Ashes

Just letters. They add up over six, seven years. Threw them away in a spring clean. Not sure why I kept them.

I was talking about novels.

Anyways, I was just thinking, come January I'm likely to change my mind.

Okay, that's not so crazy. I'm sure you've heard the stories about authors getting their first agent after plenty of rejections on their fifth or whatever manuscript.
Ashes
Member
(10-25-2014, 11:26 AM)
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Originally Posted by Tim the Wiz

Okay, that's not so crazy. I'm sure you've heard the stories about authors getting their first agent after plenty of rejections on their fifth or whatever manuscript.

Yep. Yep.
Shengar
Member
(10-25-2014, 01:00 PM)
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Writing fiction that focus on military warfare is hard
It's like you need to read tons of book about great generals
afternoon delight
Eat shit and die, Ricky!
Eat shit and live, Bill.
(10-25-2014, 01:47 PM)
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Just wanted to say, this one's for all the unpaid writers out there working regular jobs with a head full of dreams-

I'm Not Down by The Clash
SquiddyCracker
Banned
(10-25-2014, 01:50 PM)
Oh my god, this is super handy :D
AngmarsKing701
Member
(10-25-2014, 02:42 PM)
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Originally Posted by Elfforkusu

Ctrl+F draft2digital.com. No results found!

So... for those of you who don't know about d2d, it's basically exactly like SmashWords, but in an alternate universe where SmashWords didn't suck.


... well, the landscape looks a lot different than it used to. You don't ever pay to e-publish, unless you're really awful at formatting your own book.

I'd love to be published properly, but realistically ... what I need isn't a publisher, it's a marketer.

I'll definitely check out d2d. When my original KDP term ended I started down the Smashwords road and got a crapload of formatting errors back (this is in the same thing I have up on Amazon). I just didn't feel like fixing all of them so I re-upped with KDP.


And I agree with you. I'm published already. I just need someone to help me point readers to my work. But there are millions of books out there, so it's a tough market to be in. I'm thankful every day I have a job that allows me to pay my bills, feed my family, etc. Because so far writing has barely allowed me to cover expenses.
Woorloog
Member
(10-25-2014, 03:11 PM)
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Originally Posted by Shengar

Writing fiction that focus on military warfare is hard
It's like you need to read tons of book about great generals

This one book i read, i think it was Warcraft 2 novelization... the author clearly had no idea about warfare. In a book about fantasy war.
The tactics anyone used boiled down to "Charge!". Every single time. And the sequel was more of the same.

But i reckon knowledge about great generals is not really enough, or even needed necessarily.
I think it may be easier to study individual battles and adapt them to your own fiction. Like, you want a landing-invasion, study the Operation Overlord, and other landing operations. If you want a battle where an army gets besieged/encircled, study such battles from history, and adapt them.

A couple of things to keep in mind when it comes to warfare:
Most battles and wars are lost by the loser (when they're not stacked against the loser already by circumstances), not won by the victor.
And this (paraphrased/misquoted) adage: Good commanders think tactics, great commanders think logistics (i don't recall exactly how it goes but something akin to that).
Not sure how to use these in writing though. Also not sure if a reader wants to read about logistics, and the enemy losing because they were stupid.
Last edited by Woorloog; 10-25-2014 at 03:15 PM.
Shengar
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(10-25-2014, 03:58 PM)
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Originally Posted by Woorloog

This one book i read, i think it was Warcraft 2 novelization... the author clearly had no idea about warfare. In a book about fantasy war.
The tactics anyone used boiled down to "Charge!". Every single time. And the sequel was more of the same.

Great reply, let me answer it in specific point

Yeah, in fantasy no matter how "epic" the war is most of the time the aspect of warfare itself most of the time got ignored. Even The First Law trilogy which most people praise for its realistic and gritty aspect doesn't cover this in meaningful light. Sanderson's actually got this better (but that's not saying much actually), it's shamefully become irrelevant because of plot reason.

Originally Posted by Woorloog

But i reckon knowledge about great generals is not really enough, or even needed necessarily.
I think it may be easier to study individual battles and adapt them to your own fiction. Like, you want a landing-invasion, study the Operation Overlord, and other landing operations. If you want a battle where an army gets besieged/encircled, study such battles from history, and adapt them.

When I said studying great generals, that because they are the good place for a starting point. While not every great battle won by a great generals, they usually accumulate notable victories that earned fame for them. At this point, my knowledge pool on specific battles isn't big enough, and history of warfare is very vast so its kinda overwhelmed me.

The recreating historical battles in your fiction is pretty spot on though, I agree.

Originally Posted by Woorloog

A couple of things to keep in mind when it comes to warfare:
Most battles and wars are lost by the loser (when they're not stacked against the loser already by circumstances), not won by the victor.
And this (paraphrased/misquoted) adage: Good commanders think tactics, great commanders think logistics (i don't recall exactly how it goes but something akin to that).
Not sure how to use these in writing though. Also not sure if a reader wants to read about logistics, and the enemy losing because they were stupid.

First point is true. Just now I brainstormed "how to make this battle where an outnumbered army could slaughter their opposition in convincing". I think off tactics, strategies, troops armaments and compositions, of the winning side, but it still just not come up right. When I'm switched to the other side of why they lose, it's become significantly easier to make a convincing, believable battle.
Second point is true as this is already proven numerous of time in history. They said the easiest way to drive back huge army is to disrupt their supply line, then see them crumble from the inside. The most famous example probably the Scorching Earth strategy the Russian Empire employed against Napoleon during his invasion.
As for third point, I think as the logistic only mentioned when it's mattered it could an interesting subject for the reader (of course it still falls on how the author conveyed it). But when fantasy element involved, it could be really different. Like, have it ever come to your mind how lizard rider feed their mount? This could branched out in many different aspects that could affect lizard rider usage in a war, a detail that in my opinion makes fantastical military unit much more interesting and convincing.
Woorloog
Member
(10-25-2014, 05:28 PM)
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Originally Posted by Shengar

Sanderson's actually got this better (but that's not saying much actually).

Sanderson seems to be aware of his limitations and stays rather vague about most details, and combined with fantasy battlezones and magic, and the general focus in characters leads to a situation where there is no issue really. Sanderson's works are not military fiction really (unlike Warcraft, while high-fantasy as well, its name says it all...), so this isn't a big issue, i think.
Smoke and mirrors, of course. As long as the reader doesn't start questioning things, i think that's good enough. My Warcraft example didn't pass that test.
No comment on the First Law, can't recall enough about it as i didn't really like it.

Originally Posted by Shengar

When I said studying great generals, that because they are the good place for a starting point.

I guess... i can see some reasons as for why but i'm not sure about that. I guess it depends partially on whether one is going to describe war from a general's or a soldier's or civilian's perspective.
But i reckon they can't be a bad starting point, simply reading about warfare is overwhelming, as you say.

BTW, i didn't necessarily mean re-creating historical battles in fiction, but rather using them as the baseline. What did a landing operation need IRL? Do i have that in my fictional world? Do i have some special thing, like magic, that would change the course of a battle? Etc.
Of course, that's just me, i like considering stuff like this, applying what i have and don't have in logical manner. May be quite a bit of work though.
It is even easier just to copy-paste and file off the serial numbers, and that isn't necessarily a bad thing: Drawing on pop-culture can be a powerful thing, an useful thing; though not without issues, of course.

Originally Posted by Shengar

Like, have it ever come to your mind how lizard rider feed their mount? This could branched out in many different aspects that could affect lizard rider usage in a war, a detail that in my opinion makes fantastical military unit much more interesting and convincing.

This reminds me: The Elder Scrolls series has some interesting applications of magic to warfare, in the in-universe literature if not the actual games themselves.
In this case, an army's magi cast waterbreathing-spell for the entire army and the army marched through a lake to attack the enemy positions. Very handy trick. I mean, imagine the enemy surprise when an entire army emerges from the lake...

This ties to the worldbuilding quite heavily, especially the magic's limitations and abilities. The worst case is one-shot use of magic (as it unfortunately seems to be the case for the Elder Scrolls), or an asspull use, deus ex machina.


For science fiction warfare, space warfare, i'm to link Atomic Rocket site for those who might be interested: http://www.projectrho.com/public_html/rocket/index.php
The site is intended as a resource for all things scifi, and has big sections for space warfare. Very handy, and has advice that can be applied in general, not just in scifi.
H.Protagonist
[-_-]/
(10-26-2014, 01:28 AM)
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Nice work, Angmars! Will probably have more stuff for the Marketing section in the next week or two.


I also think adding a section to the OP called GAF Resources or something might be good. GAF has a few prominent/seasonal threads specifically for developing or practicing writing skills which are really good resources for budding writers.

NaNoWriMo Thread - Key novel writing push thread from experience. ;)
NeoGAF Creative Writing Challenge Threads - Mini-writing exercises to develop your skills and get feedback.
NeoGAF's Poetry Corner

I know these threads change pretty frequently, but having them noted here and getting a heads-up in the mega writing thread when they do update would be pretty cool.
AlteredBeast
Fork 'em, Sparky!
(10-27-2014, 05:03 AM)
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What happened to FirstStrike?


To all the oldtimers and newcomers (I include myself under both categories, sadly enough) and for posterity:

I worked on a movie screenplay off and on from 2007 and "finished it" at the end of 2012. I am not at all happy with the ending, but I made myself a goal to finish the damn thing by the end of that year and did it! My deceased dad worked on a WWII epic for around 10 years before he died and I definitely did not want that to happen to me, even if I was writing a road-trip comedy and he was writing his magnum opus: an amazing historical war drama.

Any way. Life is ridiculously busy, and I always find about 30 ways to spend what little free time I have doing other things. When I get a block of free time, I typically play Street Fighter III: 3rd Strike online, read and post on GAF, play mindless tower defense games on my phone, or watch TV shows on Netflix/Amazon (currently watching Breaking Bad for the first time and really enjoying it, just finished my first rewatch of Lost since original airing last week, and have done the same with 24, The Shield, and the Office in the past few months).

I have some amazing ideas that I have put into an idea jar, but nothing will ever become of them if I don't just decide to write. I wonder what, if anything, will ever light a fire under my ass. Optimally, I am going to go back through the last 1/3rd of my screenplay and clean it up. Then I will send it out for rejection/miracle approval. After that point, I am going to tackle one of three projects I have toyed with over the past decade:
My long-term idea for a book series/miniseries/TV show/movie trilogy (end of the world-type stuff that is really just a mask for a character study)
Rewriting my dad's screenplay and finishing it
and
Putting ink (and probably watercolor) to paper and doing the art for my own damn children's books. I have written the words for dozens, but have never tried to do the art for any of them. After seeing some of the successful children's books at the library, I am 100% sure I could match their quality of art.
Hopefully as I summon the desire and ambition to get back to creative work, I will be able to quote my own posts and cross out some of these lines someday...soon.
Shengar
Member
(10-28-2014, 06:14 PM)
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Originally Posted by Woorloog

Sanderson seems to be aware of his limitations and stays rather vague about most details, and combined with fantasy battlezones and magic, and the general focus in characters leads to a situation where there is no issue really. Sanderson's works are not military fiction really (unlike Warcraft, while high-fantasy as well, its name says it all...), so this isn't a big issue, i think.

Well it's not a focus of his novel, but since he put quite detail on it makes me kinda disappointed that he just throw it all out. But considering how Sanderson have serious issue with scale, I guess its right for him to not focus on warfare.

Originally Posted by Woorloog

This ties to the worldbuilding quite heavily, especially the magic's limitations and abilities. The worst case is one-shot use of magic (as it unfortunately seems to be the case for the Elder Scrolls), or an asspull use, deus ex machina.

I think in situation like this, the only thing that can prevent deus ex machina is the author themselves really. No matter how complex the magic system is, if the author not proficient enough in their writing they will find a way to bend the law that themselves have created by various mean. In usage of magic of warfare, authors need to take account on limitation, and how common (certain types of) magic is.

======

Not writing and reading fiction for a quite long time makes me feel rusty. Every phrase I wrote feels out of place and unsatisfying. Maybe this is why Stephen King advised to write every day.
aidan
Hugo Award Winning Author and Editor
(10-28-2014, 06:35 PM)
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Originally Posted by Tim the Wiz

Okay, that's not so crazy. I'm sure you've heard the stories about authors getting their first agent after plenty of rejections on their fifth or whatever manuscript.

Notably, John Chu's "The Water that Falls on You from Nowhere", which won the 2014 Hugo Award for Best Short Story, was rejected by fourteen editors/venues before it was finally published by Tor.com.
FlowersisBritish
fleurs n'est pas britannique
(10-29-2014, 10:55 AM)
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How many words does everybody try for? I usually try for a thousand a day and was wondering what other people's writing schedules are like?
fredrancour
Member
(10-29-2014, 11:06 AM)

Originally Posted by FlowersisBritish

How many words does everybody try for? I usually try for a thousand a day and was wondering what other people's writing schedules are like?

Bare-minimum goal is 100. This is entirely psychological self-manipulation. Anything that gets me that far, momentum carries me sailing way farther. I'm disappointed on days when I don't exceed 500. I picked this up off some author in an interview where she said this is more or less how she did it when starting out. It works for me better than anything else I tried. For me, these tiny bursts of writing are completely extemporaneous. I've been focusing on habit development more than any particular organized project.

In comparison, jumping to 1667 for nanowrimo is gonna hurt, but I think I can do it considering I'm working from outline for the process instead of freewriting.
Aaron-Lagann
Member
(10-29-2014, 11:08 AM)
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Originally Posted by FlowersisBritish

How many words does everybody try for? I usually try for a thousand a day and was wondering what other people's writing schedules are like?

I really need to work out a schedule, especially with that whole Writing Month thing coming up as an excuse to actually finish something. I usually just don't write for days upon days then do 5-7 thousand in a sitting.
Mike M
Nick N
(10-29-2014, 02:41 PM)
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Originally Posted by FlowersisBritish

How many words does everybody try for? I usually try for a thousand a day and was wondering what other people's writing schedules are like?

For NaNo, I go for writing chapters and don't worry about the word count. I'm shooting for one each weekday and two on weekends.

The rest of the time, I don't much worry about it. I'm either writing something for Creative Writing Challenge GAF, or revising it.
Soulfire
Member
(10-29-2014, 06:48 PM)
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I try to write 350 words Monday-Friday, if I miss a day I work to make it up. I don't normally have an issue with that, and most of the time go over, but some days that 350 is like pulling teeth and I struggle.
cosmicblizzard
Banned
(10-29-2014, 07:58 PM)
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Originally Posted by FlowersisBritish

How many words does everybody try for? I usually try for a thousand a day and was wondering what other people's writing schedules are like?

500 a day minimum, no exceptions. I'm on vacation in the Bahamas right now and I'm still sticking to that rule. Only time I'll take a break is between books, so I can go nearly a year without taking a day off.
AngmarsKing701
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(10-30-2014, 02:42 AM)
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Originally Posted by FlowersisBritish

How many words does everybody try for? I usually try for a thousand a day and was wondering what other people's writing schedules are like?

Biggest problem for me is time. I have a full time job, so writing is usually limited to weekends. Minimum 1000 words per weekend.
cosmicblizzard
Banned
(10-30-2014, 08:30 PM)
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Met a guy at the water park today whose wife works for Simon & Schuster. I asked how that was, preparing to jokingly ask him if she could get me published with them. His response was "pretty alright if you ignore the fact it's where creativity goes to die."

No real point to this story nor is it an affront to S&S or traditional publishing in general. Just thought it was amusing.
Biff
Banned
(11-02-2014, 10:52 PM)
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I'm submitting this post on behalf of my girlfriend (account in approval), so we'd really appreciate your help. Everything from here on is her voice (er... keystrokes). :)

"Hi NeoGAF! I'm at the stage where I'm querying agents and a common element of what they're looking for is 'social media profile.' I was wondering if anyone has any advice on this subject and building my internet presence? Has anyone had success setting up a website? Blogging, tweeting, that kind of thing? If so, what kind of content are you posting? Specific to your book/writing, or just musings in general?

Thanks so much! This community seems awesome and supportive, which is hard to find. I hope my account gets approved soon! :)"
AngmarsKing701
Member
(11-03-2014, 12:00 AM)
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Originally Posted by ChefRamsay

I'm submitting this post on behalf of my girlfriend (account in approval), so we'd really appreciate your help. Everything from here on is her voice (er... keystrokes). :)

"Hi NeoGAF! I'm at the stage where I'm querying agents and a common element of what they're looking for is 'social media profile.' I was wondering if anyone has any advice on this subject and building my internet presence? Has anyone had success setting up a website? Blogging, tweeting, that kind of thing? If so, what kind of content are you posting? Specific to your book/writing, or just musings in general?

Thanks so much! This community seems awesome and supportive, which is hard to find. I hope my account gets approved soon! :)"

I have a website where I blog, though it's been a while since I put anything up. Mostly about writing, though I wrote one about my Fitbit and a review of Abercrombie's latest book. I used WordPress.

I also have a Facebook page and I tweet regularly.
Vincent Alexander
Member
(11-03-2014, 12:59 AM)
Vincent Alexander's Avatar
Holy shit. I must read Todd Hunter's "When God Gets Bored". The Amazon description has me sold.
cosmicblizzard
Banned
(11-04-2014, 02:29 AM)
cosmicblizzard's Avatar
Ouch, first negative review on Goodreads. Ah well, all I can do is take the criticism to heart and accept I can't make everyone happy.


Anyway, does anybody know of a cheap, decent copy editor? The one I found on my own last time was a bit much and the friend that's doing it now is moving WAY too slowly. I shouldn't really be complaining about the latter since all he's asking for is some ice cream (which I'll buy him anyway) despite generally charging in the hundreds, but I am trying to get my second book out in early 2015, which seems pretty impossible at his current pace.
Mike M
Nick N
(11-04-2014, 05:08 AM)
Mike M's Avatar

Originally Posted by cosmicblizzard

Anyway, does anybody know of a cheap, decent copy editor?

Pretty sure you can have only one of these things.
H.Protagonist
[-_-]/
(11-04-2014, 05:59 AM)
H.Protagonist's Avatar

Originally Posted by ChefRamsay

I'm submitting this post on behalf of my girlfriend (account in approval), so we'd really appreciate your help. Everything from here on is her voice (er... keystrokes). :)

"Hi NeoGAF! I'm at the stage where I'm querying agents and a common element of what they're looking for is 'social media profile.' I was wondering if anyone has any advice on this subject and building my internet presence? Has anyone had success setting up a website? Blogging, tweeting, that kind of thing? If so, what kind of content are you posting? Specific to your book/writing, or just musings in general?

Thanks so much! This community seems awesome and supportive, which is hard to find. I hope my account gets approved soon! :)"


Hi, girlfriend of ChefRamsay!

A website for your work might be a good idea, but I've heard that splitting your presence up into so many pieces when you're first starting out actually dilutes how effective you are at getting the word out about yourself or your project.

I'd focus on a twitter account that you can funnel people to from the other various profiles that you can set up such as Good Reads and Facebook, etc.

With twitter you can cultivate an audience quickly - best done by focusing on a topic that incorporates your work but isn't solely your work (like just talking about books, or writing, etc., in general). No one's going to keep coming back to your twitter account if all you do is talk about your specific work, after all. - and talk one on one with people very easily.

You could also do a blog that incorporates your twitter (and the twitter likewise links back), so that you can present yourself and talk more in depth about things. This might be a good option for you because then you'll have a 'website' of sorts, but one that feels more accessible to casual viewers, especially if it has a general theme that a lot of people like to browse/chat back and forth about. <--that's why I think a specific website is unnecessary, really. You'll get better traction on sites that have huge userbases to begin with.

For content, as I said, pick a theme and work loosely in that area. Mine started off as an extension of my company's twitter since I used to run it, so now it's 1/2 video game localization musings, 1 part my book talk, and the rest is devoted to spiders, cats, and alcohol. :P

But, if you look at the cover image and info I have displayed, I'm still getting word about my book out without having to tweet about it.

https://twitter.com/HProtagonista

So, basically, I've found twitter to be my best tool to cultivate a social media presence. \[-_-]/


Originally Posted by Vincent Alexander

Holy shit. I must read Todd Hunter's "When God Gets Bored". The Amazon description has me sold.

I've got his Being Hamish one up on my reading list. That Todd is a prolific fellow. :)


Originally Posted by cosmicblizzard

Ouch, first negative review on Goodreads. Ah well, all I can do is take the criticism to heart and accept I can't make everyone happy.


Anyway, does anybody know of a cheap, decent copy editor? The one I found on my own last time was a bit much and the friend that's doing it now is moving WAY too slowly. I shouldn't really be complaining about the latter since all he's asking for is some ice cream (which I'll buy him anyway) despite generally charging in the hundreds, but I am trying to get my second book out in early 2015, which seems pretty impossible at his current pace.

Well, as Mike M said, you kind of only get one or the other. I don't know the pricing of Sparkler one I posted about before, but they might have sliding scales of editing levels and rates to go with it. I can vouch that they're cruel but very effective, at least. :)
cosmicblizzard
Banned
(11-04-2014, 06:20 AM)
cosmicblizzard's Avatar
This is true. Guess I'll shop around on my own a bit more and decide where to go from there.
Woorloog
Member
(11-04-2014, 11:02 AM)
Woorloog's Avatar
So WTF right now. I had this dream, a dream that makes a perfect setup for a story, some unpleasantness aside (as always with my lucid dreams, they turn into (mild) nightmares fast).
Initial location, characters, events. Just remove the unnecessary unpleasantness, which doesn't even serve as a source of conflict.

It feels so damn odd. I've never had any ideas to this direction, i don't think the dream was any kind of subconscious thing either, just restless dream... But it works.

Has anyone else ever gotten ideas from dreams?
toddhunter
Member
(11-04-2014, 11:54 AM)
toddhunter's Avatar

Originally Posted by Vincent Alexander

Holy shit. I must read Todd Hunter's "When God Gets Bored". The Amazon description has me sold.

Originally Posted by H.Protagonist

I've got his Being Hamish one up on my reading list. That Todd is a prolific fellow. :)

Thanks :) It is amazing how encouraging the people on gaf are.
H.Protagonist
[-_-]/
(11-05-2014, 12:13 AM)
H.Protagonist's Avatar

Originally Posted by Woorloog

So WTF right now. I had this dream, a dream that makes a perfect setup for a story, some unpleasantness aside (as always with my lucid dreams, they turn into (mild) nightmares fast).
Initial location, characters, events. Just remove the unnecessary unpleasantness, which doesn't even serve as a source of conflict.

It feels so damn odd. I've never had any ideas to this direction, i don't think the dream was any kind of subconscious thing either, just restless dream... But it works.

Has anyone else ever gotten ideas from dreams?

All the time! I dream particularly vividly and with very specific details, so I jot down the memorable ones and sometimes play with them to see what kind of stories come out. Most of my dreams are pretty weird/nightmare-ish material, so that's why I tend to lean towards the horror genre, I think. I say take your night thoughts and run with them!


Originally Posted by toddhunter

Thanks :) It is amazing how encouraging the people on gaf are.

It's because we're drunk all the time. :D
Cyan
Red
(11-05-2014, 01:12 AM)
Cyan's Avatar

Originally Posted by H.Protagonist

It's because we're drunk all the time. :D

"That's my secret, Cap. I'm always drunk."
Timu
Member
(11-05-2014, 02:17 AM)
Timu's Avatar

Originally Posted by Cyan

"That's my secret, Cap. I'm always drunk."

Biff
Banned
(11-05-2014, 02:56 AM)
Biff's Avatar
Passing the keyboard back to Ms. Ramsay

Originally Posted by AngmarsKing701

I have a website where I blog, though it's been a while since I put anything up. Mostly about writing, though I wrote one about my Fitbit and a review of Abercrombie's latest book. I used WordPress.

I also have a Facebook page and I tweet regularly.

Thanks a lot for the help. I've been looking into WordPress and I think I might go with that too. :)

Originally Posted by H.Protagonist

Hi, girlfriend of ChefRamsay!

A website for your work might be a good idea, but I've heard that splitting your presence up into so many pieces when you're first starting out actually dilutes how effective you are at getting the word out about yourself or your project.

I'd focus on a twitter account that you can funnel people to from the other various profiles that you can set up such as Good Reads and Facebook, etc.

With twitter you can cultivate an audience quickly - best done by focusing on a topic that incorporates your work but isn't solely your work (like just talking about books, or writing, etc., in general). No one's going to keep coming back to your twitter account if all you do is talk about your specific work, after all. - and talk one on one with people very easily.

You could also do a blog that incorporates your twitter (and the twitter likewise links back), so that you can present yourself and talk more in depth about things. This might be a good option for you because then you'll have a 'website' of sorts, but one that feels more accessible to casual viewers, especially if it has a general theme that a lot of people like to browse/chat back and forth about. <--that's why I think a specific website is unnecessary, really. You'll get better traction on sites that have huge userbases to begin with.

For content, as I said, pick a theme and work loosely in that area. Mine started off as an extension of my company's twitter since I used to run it, so now it's 1/2 video game localization musings, 1 part my book talk, and the rest is devoted to spiders, cats, and alcohol. :P

But, if you look at the cover image and info I have displayed, I'm still getting word about my book out without having to tweet about it.

https://twitter.com/HProtagonista

So, basically, I've found twitter to be my best tool to cultivate a social media presence. \[-_-]/

Thanks so much. This is a lot of really great information and definitely seems like a good starting point for me. Twitter + blog seems like a really good mix. Btw, Dead Endings looks awesome - definitely going to check it out. ^_^
H.Protagonist
[-_-]/
(11-05-2014, 06:47 AM)
H.Protagonist's Avatar

Originally Posted by Cyan

"That's my secret, Cap. I'm always drunk."

“Do you drink?"
"Of course, I just said I was a writer.”


Originally Posted by ChefRamsay

Passing the keyboard back to Ms. Ramsay



Thanks a lot for the help. I've been looking into WordPress and I think I might go with that too. :)



Thanks so much. This is a lot of really great information and definitely seems like a good starting point for me. Twitter + blog seems like a really good mix. Btw, Dead Endings looks awesome - definitely going to check it out. ^_^

Sure thing! Hope you get approved soon. Let me know when you get your twitter too. I'll follow and tweet a blob fish your way (a time honored greeting among gentlemen and ladies.)

And cheers for having a look at Dead Endings. ^_^ It has pretty art and amuses me.
toddhunter
Member
(11-05-2014, 07:45 AM)
toddhunter's Avatar

Originally Posted by H.Protagonist

It's because we're drunk all the time. :D

I'll drink to that.
cosmicblizzard
Banned
(11-05-2014, 05:00 PM)
cosmicblizzard's Avatar
Okay yeah, looks like Book Gorilla works. It's barely been a few hours and it's already nearly doubled my total sales. Not sure if I'll get my money back after paying extra to get it starred, but this is damn reassuring.

Will post the final number once the sale is over.
Fidelis Hodie
Infidelis Cras
(11-05-2014, 05:09 PM)
Fidelis Hodie's Avatar
Shiny new thread, I like it! I'll try to be more active, I'm terrible at being a community sport. Too many drive by posts from me for sure.

57pgs, 17,800k into the Derek Agons sequel. Got the 2nd book pretty much mapped out with a good enough outline through 6. Knowing the bigger points I wanted to hit at the end of 3, beginning of 4 and end of 6 helped quite a lot.

I'm like, psuedo doing my own NaNomimnaja (lol what's the acronym again?) since I was already a good 14k words into the book by the time it started. Just reading everyone in that thread (go Cyan for organizing that!!) pushing words out really has gotten my ass in gear.

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