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Auto_aim1
MeisaMcCaffrey
(04-21-2017, 08:56 AM)
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Originally Posted by Shogmaster

160/95 was what I had before it shot up to 220/190 back in 2012. And guess what? I was also on only amlodipine (10mg). I would ask them to find something else to try.

Could it be that your kidneys are causing this issue and not the opposite? Have you shown your renal report to a Nephrologist? I'm assuming they must have checked everything during your hospital stay so I'm not really sure about what's causing this problem.
komplanen
Member
(04-21-2017, 08:58 AM)
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I love how people imagine doctors as super humans and then dump on them if they actually are just humans.
Shogmaster
Not genuinely interested in rational debate.
(04-21-2017, 08:59 AM)
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Originally Posted by A Fish Aficionado

And yet you backhand compliment a former "USC" medical doctor. Why, if your skeptical of docs would you see that dude?

Docs are bound to be skeptical, sometimes to the detriment of patients, but you are also having a bias.

This may be true. I haven't yet met a doctor that I like.
Shogmaster
Not genuinely interested in rational debate.
(04-21-2017, 09:01 AM)
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Originally Posted by Auto_aim1

Could it be that your kidneys are causing this issue and not the opposite? Have you shown your renal report to a Nephrologist? I'm assuming they must have checked everything during your hospital stay so I'm not really sure about what's causing this problem.

They tested for that back in 2012 ER visit. They did the ultrasound and other test to see if there was a blockage in the kidneys. They found nothing. 4 days of tests and "Gee, we don't know! *shrug* That will be $30,000."
guek
Banned
(04-21-2017, 09:04 AM)
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Originally Posted by Shogmaster

They tested for that back in 2012 ER visit. They did the ultrasound and other test to see if there was a blockage in the kidneys. They found nothing. 4 days of tests and "Gee, we don't know! *shrug* That will be $30,000."

2012 was five years ago. You are literally not the same person you were then.
Shogmaster
Not genuinely interested in rational debate.
(04-21-2017, 09:07 AM)
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Originally Posted by guek

2012 was five years ago. You are literally not the same person you were then.

lol, I've been saying 4 years ago all this time. It is 5 years ago. Either way, unless they had some crazy breakthrough in BP related medicine, I don't think they will find anything new. And I can't afford 4 more days of hospital stay for kicks.
guek
Banned
(04-21-2017, 09:10 AM)
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Originally Posted by Shogmaster

lol, I've been saying 4 years ago all this time. It is 5 years ago. Either way, unless they had some crazy breakthrough in BP related medicine, I don't think they will find anything new. And I can't afford 4 more days of hospital stay for kicks.

NetMapel
Guilty White Male Mods Gave Me This Tag
(04-21-2017, 09:41 AM)
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I sympathize with your frustration but please go find a doctor immediately. Self diagnosing like this especially your heart is so dangerous and can cause problems in the future. It sucks that your healthcare system is horrible but please seek out professional helps with your heart.
Piku_Ringo
Member
(04-21-2017, 09:45 AM)
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Same here, went to the doctor around Feb, for a regular check up, initial 185/100, after being around the 122 range after 2 years on Losartan. Get told I should go to Walgreens, etc where they had a machine that could test it. So I go there after leaving the DR's office. Pharmacist takes me to the room with the machine, and It' gets reading from anywhere from 198 to 226. Pulse rate was around 99-100, Pharmacist having taken this by hand. He's concerned, calls DR's office inquiring if he should call an ambulance for me. Office advises him to tell me to come back cause they will treat me there. So I got back, taken to an empty room where i am told to lay down after taking this pink colored pill, end up taking 3 doses of it until the machine at the office ended up clocking in at around 175/90 I believe.

So doctor advises me to walk in tomorrow and see if there is any changes. Next day, same reading of 185 again. Doc tells me that is the new baseline and gives me samples of Edarbi 80mg, 1 per day. Cool Go home, later on that day I end up suffering a panic attack over the whole ordeal, so I check myself into the hospital initial readings were 175 abouts. End up spending 3 days in there, BP levels rose and fell below that number, but never to 200. lowest was around 118/60 upon waking up during the early mornings due to the cuff filling up. Blood work, Urine sample, x-rays even a CTA, all came back normal. Potassium levels were low, so I was given half a pill for it. One thing that struck during my brief stay there was one of the nurses mentioning a relative's getting high readings when in places like a doctor's office, but low readings when preforming the test at home. So I can't help but wonder if anxiety could play a factor in for the high readings when going to such places.
Nivash
(04-21-2017, 09:53 AM)
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Originally Posted by Piku_Ringo

Same here, went to the doctor around Feb, for a regular check up, initial 185/100, after being around the 122 range after 2 years on Losartan. Get told I should go to Walgreens, etc where they had a machine that could test it. So I go there after leaving the DR's office. Pharmacist takes me to the room with the machine, and It' gets reading from anywhere from 198 to 226. Pulse rate was around 99-100, Pharmacist having taken this by hand. He's concerned, calls DR's office inquiring if he should call an ambulance for me. Office advises him to tell me to come back cause they will treat me there. So I got back, taken to an empty room where i am told to lay down after taking this pink colored pill, end up taking 3 doses of it until the machine at the office ended up clocking in at around 175/90 I believe.

So doctor advises me to walk in tomorrow and see if there is any changes. Next day, same reading of 185 again. Doc tells me that is the new baseline and gives me samples of Edarbi 80mg, 1 per day. Cool Go home, later on that day I end up suffering a panic attack over the whole ordeal, so I check myself into the hospital initial readings were 175 abouts. End up spending 3 days in there, BP levels rose and fell below that number, but never to 200. lowest was around 118/60 upon waking up during the early mornings due to the cuff filling up. Blood work, Urine sample, x-rays even a CTA, all came back normal. Potassium levels were low, so I was given half a pill for it. One thing that struck during my brief stay there was one of the nurses mentioning a relative's getting high readings when in places like a doctor's office, but low readings when preforming the test at home. So I can't help but wonder if anxiety could play a factor in for the high readings when going to such places.

It's definitely a common problem and something I might suspect at least played a role in your case, considering your normal morning value and your admittedly high stress level about the whole ordeal. One option in those cases is to hook the patient up to portable meter that can take measurements over 24 hours. It's basically the same as the hospital readings, but much more accurate, because you get away from the whole stressfully clinical atmosphere.

Originally Posted by Shogmaster

Harbor UCLA had me try everything but beta blockers. The meds I'm taking now are metoprolol, amlodipine, and Diovan HCT.

That's a pretty comprehensive cocktails, to be fair. It could have some room for adjustment depending on dosage and your own adjustment could even be one of the better options. It mostly sounds like you need to find a doc who can take the time to get to know you and who you can trust, though.
Last edited by Nivash; 04-21-2017 at 09:58 AM.
NEO0MJ
Member
(04-21-2017, 09:57 AM)
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Originally Posted by komplanen

I love how people imagine doctors as super humans and then dump on them if they actually are just humans.

Considering how much we're paying for their services you would expect something better.
True Savior
Member
(04-21-2017, 10:19 AM)
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I'm sorry OP. Doctors are indeed as incompetent as other people.
hirokazu
Member
(04-21-2017, 10:35 AM)
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I'm a little bit confused. Were you recording regular blood pressure measurements in that 4 or 5 years since you first started seeing this doctor? I'm assuming you have, sounds to me like although they were elevated, they weren't of major concern, which suggests that massive spike you had wasn't the fault of the medication, but whatever underlying issue you have.

The second thing I'd like to add is that if your doctor isn't listening to your symptoms and experience with the medication and insisting they can't be wrong, you should by all means change to a different doctor. Good doctors take the time to listen to their patients, and even if they believe their patients are wrong in insisting something, they should explain it to the patient instead of making it seem like they're not listening.

That said, you also come across as rather disparaging of doctors, you might want to also consider that some things you're trying to insist is the case may not be true.

I'd advise you to see a new doctor, get them up to speed on what's happened so far, and especially the most recent events. Don't be discouraged if they try the same tests as before that resulted in nothing, sometimes they might miss something that a repeat test picks up. Hopefully they'll be able to find what's actually wrong because it sounds pretty scary.

I'm sorry you live in a country with shitty healthcare, because I feel the situation would be a lot better if it didn't cost your life savings to potentially save your life.
ClosingADoor
Member
(04-21-2017, 10:40 AM)
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To be fair, most patients are fucking useless also. The amount of bullshit doctors must be dealing with is enormous. But you got to stay on top of things yourself and switch doctors if you feel the current one is not doing his job properly. Please don't stop visiting doctors because of this.
BlackBanditSho
Member
(04-21-2017, 10:40 AM)

Originally Posted by True Savior

I'm sorry OP. Doctors are indeed as incompetent as other people.

I wouldn't say that. They're trying to help us course correct an issue that we put ourselves in. Normally, we come in just as that issue is at the precipice of disaster and expect miracles. They're human, and we're scared, All this talk of hypertension being a silent killer is frightening. I have a two year old, and the last thing I want is to keel over and die from a stroke while driving her to daycare.

It's a frightening situation is all. I only read/replied to this thread because I saw Gaffers in a similar situation to my own. The impulse is to say, "hell that guy's situation is worse than mine, so I mustn't be THAT bad!", but the truth of it is that my own shitty diet, comatose lifestyle, high stress, and terrible eating habits puts my 160/99 equal to the the 200/150. It's none of it good.

Anyway, just wanted to vent with the OP. Its 230am, I can't sleep because allergies are kicking my butt, and the combo of allergies exacerbating asthma, making me breathe like I ran a quick mile with one nostril open has me laying on the couch reading Gaf, petrified that every neck pain that I get isn't actually poor sleeping position but a stroke telltale.

So yeah, alternating between this thread and trying to figure out how to move my family into a home from a Los Angeles apartment based on a contractor job that could evaporate any day...

...yeah, my blood pressure is a little spiked. Lol. Zelda time, I guess...
Last edited by BlackBanditSho; 04-21-2017 at 10:44 AM.
komplanen
Member
(04-21-2017, 10:41 AM)
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Originally Posted by NEO0MJ

Considering how much we're paying for their services you would expect something better.

You are paying them a lot because of their personal investment in medical school and the fact that (in many countries) there aren't enough of them.

Also 'fucking useless' is so far from the truth that I bet OP's BP did most of the talking anyways :-3
Adam_Roman
Member
(04-21-2017, 10:54 AM)
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Two years ago I told my doctor I've been feeling depressed, having breakdowns etc, she prescribed me lexapro. I took it and felt worse but stuck it out. Two weeks, still feel worse, by the time I got 6 weeks I stopped. I told her it made me feel worse and wanted to try something else if possible and she said "no the problem is the dosage. I'll double it." I didn't even pick it up.

A few months later I started seeing a therapist who recommended me to a psychiatrist in his building. The guy asks me about 10 questions about how I feel and asks about medication. I say I mention my doctor ignoring what I said and doubling the dose and he looks at me in shock and said he'd never heard of a doctor with such little regard for a patient's concern. He prescribed me effexor and from day one I've been feeling way better. I also switched primary care physicians to someone who actually is willing to listen and respond when I voice concerns.
Shogmaster
Not genuinely interested in rational debate.
(04-21-2017, 10:59 AM)
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Holy shit, double the dosage since it makes you feel terrible? Was she getting some action from people making Lexapro or what?
Onaco
Member
(04-21-2017, 11:24 AM)
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Originally Posted by Shogmaster

I think Google should start working. on doctor.google.com and save us from shitty doctors.

Nah, they should just keep the liability away and just link to Yahoo Answers so teens can find out if their tuna made them pregnant or not.
SillyEskimo
Member
(04-21-2017, 12:26 PM)
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Originally Posted by A Fish Aficionado

this may involve violating HIPAA or patient confidentiality, but what were roughly the meds given to you?

Its not a violation of HIPAA for someone to talk about their healthcare. They could upload all their documents to the Internet if they wanted. It's a violation if the provider or others involved in their care do it without the patient's knowledge or permission, but patients are free to do whatever they want with their own medical information.
le.phat
Member
(04-21-2017, 12:35 PM)
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- nvm.

Don't self medicate bruh. Use that energy to take care of yourself instead. And be grateful that you didn't catch that stroke.
Lamel
Member
(04-21-2017, 12:45 PM)
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You impatiently self increased your dose of a beta blocker without knowing the risks or getting a consultation. Thank god you're not a doctor.
CSJ
Member
(04-21-2017, 12:48 PM)
I've given up on GP's, I had blood tests to check my thyroid levels and they said it was all ok. I asked to see it, they have acceptable X - X ranges and mine was way outside of it.

I asked him "Why aren't you checking this further when my results are outside of the normal ranges" and he basically hand-waved some medical bullshit at me, I know people in other countries who have the same problems, are getting help and feel better for it, with closer to normal levels.

In fact today my brother went to the same doctor and had to make some shit up just to get the doctor to listen, they tested him as if he was a female. I'm not being hyperbolic either, his results literally said on the piece of paper that the results were for a females testosterone levels. At least he's getting help now.

So basically, unless I'm pissing or shitting blood, fallen unconscious or something falls off I'm not going to a doctor and wasting money.
Ebris
Member
(04-21-2017, 12:57 PM)
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I was just recently diagnosed with IgA nephropathy, which led me to getting to Stage IV Chronic Kidney Disease. IgAN can lead to very high blood pressure. You mentioned kidney damage - do you know if this was before or after your hypertension? I'd consider looking into a biopsy depending on what your doc says.
Nivash
(04-21-2017, 12:58 PM)
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Originally Posted by CSJ

I've given up on GP's, I had blood tests to check my thyroid levels and they said it was all ok. I asked to see it, they have acceptable X - X ranges and mine was way outside of it.

I asked him "Why aren't you checking this further when my results are outside of the normal ranges" and he basically hand-waved some medical bullshit at me, I know people in other countries who have the same problems, are getting help and feel better for it, with closer to normal levels.

In fact today my brother went to the same doctor and had to make some shit up just to get the doctor to listen, they tested him as if he was a female. I'm not being hyperbolic either, his results literally said on the piece of paper that the results were for a females testosterone levels. At least he's getting help now.

So basically, unless I'm pissing or shitting blood, fallen unconscious or something falls off I'm not going to a doctor and wasting money.

Thyroid range levels are misleading. It's true that the labs put the ranges for TSH at about 0,5 - 4,5 mU/L (NB: local labs can use other ranges) but the value itself isn't indicative for treatment until it's above 10. Values between 4,5 and 10 can be indicative for further investigation but that's dependent on clinical findings. In either case, a normal T4 value usually overrules any slightly aberrant TSH value in that range because T4 is the actual hormone, TSH is just a proxy.

And sure, some healthcare providers do treat people for so-called subclinical hypothyroidism and some people do feel better because of this, but that's not unexpected. Giving someone synthetic thyroid hormone when they're not actually hypothyroid puts them in hyperthyroid territory which for some - but not all - people results in increased energy and weight loss. It's not risk free however and not advisable for everyone.
Last edited by Nivash; 04-21-2017 at 01:02 PM.
Lockehardt
Member
(04-21-2017, 12:58 PM)
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Over 40 and obese. Yes, it's all the doctor's fault your BP is out of control.
Shogmaster
Not genuinely interested in rational debate.
(04-21-2017, 12:59 PM)
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Originally Posted by Lamel

You impatiently self increased your dose of a beta blocker without knowing the risks or getting a consultation. Thank god you're not a doctor.

Right... So if I went to my doctor the next day, knowing that I had difficulty finding combination of drugs that worked prior, he wouldn't have done the same damn thing? Diovan is already near max dosage. Amlodipin was totally ineffective by itself. The only option given in my situation was to increase the dosage of Metoprolol, which was no where near max recommended dosage. So I save myself $80 and did the only logical thing after researching into my medications.
Shogmaster
Not genuinely interested in rational debate.
(04-21-2017, 01:02 PM)
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Originally Posted by Lockehardt

Over 40 and obese. Yes, it's all the doctor's fault your BP is out of control.

First, I am not obese. If you look at me walking on the street, you will see just an average looking guy. If you see me without clothes, you will say I have a bit of spare tire.

Second, I never blamed him for my wacky BP situation. I blamed him for not increasing the dosage after 4 years and my BP still hovering over 140/90.

Anyways, thanks for the drive by useless comment.
Lockehardt
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(04-21-2017, 01:04 PM)
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Originally Posted by Shogmaster

First, I am not obese. If you look at me walking on the street, you will see just an average looking guy. If you see me without clothes, you will say I have a bit of spare tire.

Second, I never blamed him for my wacky BP situation. I blamed him for not increasing the dosage after 4 years and my BP still hovering over 140/90.

Anyways, thanks for the drive by useless comment.

You might want to plug your numbers into a BMI calculator. Why would you blame a doctor for not increasing a dosage that was working?
Rhaegar
Member
(04-21-2017, 01:04 PM)
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Nothing like waking up getting ready to start a 28 hour shift in the ICU and reading that my 12 years of medical school and postgraduate training that has already cost me the price of an average mortgage and has reduced my earning potential and retirement planning all the way into my mid-30s to essentially zero is worthless. But that's okay, because my patients are appreciative and respect my sacrifices. Oh wait...

Thanks for reminding me that medicine was a bad choice.
Sapientas
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(04-21-2017, 01:11 PM)
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Originally Posted by Rhaegar

Nothing like waking up getting ready to start a 28 hour shift in the ICU and reading that my 12 years of medical school and postgraduate training that has already cost me the price of an average mortgage and has reduced my earning potential and retirement planning all the way into my mid-30s to essentially zero is worthless. But that's okay, because my patients are appreciative and respect my sacrifices. Oh wait...

Thanks for reminding me that medicine was a bad choice.

C'mon, that's clearly not OP was talking about. The title is hyperbolic and he's obviously self invested into it.

No one really believes doctors are useless or worthless, but you can definitely lose faith after a string of bad (and expensive) experiences that don't fix your problem. It can happen with most professions. If OP finds a doctor that resolves his issue all that negativity will go away.
Shogmaster
Not genuinely interested in rational debate.
(04-21-2017, 01:14 PM)
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Originally Posted by Lockehardt

You might want to plug your numbers into a BMI calculator. Why would you blame a doctor for not increasing a dosage that was working?

BMI is craptastic method to check for obesity. What year is this, 1985? And over 140/90 is stage 2 hypertension.
Last edited by Shogmaster; 04-21-2017 at 01:19 PM.
Shogmaster
Not genuinely interested in rational debate.
(04-21-2017, 01:16 PM)
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Originally Posted by Rhaegar

Nothing like waking up getting ready to start a 28 hour shift in the ICU and reading that my 12 years of medical school and postgraduate training that has already cost me the price of an average mortgage and has reduced my earning potential and retirement planning all the way into my mid-30s to essentially zero is worthless. But that's okay, because my patients are appreciative and respect my sacrifices. Oh wait...

Thanks for reminding me that medicine was a bad choice.

Do you need a hug? I will give you a hug. For realz.
Rhaegar
Member
(04-21-2017, 01:16 PM)
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Originally Posted by Sapientas

C'mon, that's clearly not OP was talking about. The title is hyperbolic and he's obviously self invested into it.

No one really believes doctors are useless or worthless, but you can definitely lose faith after a string of bad (and expensive) experiences that don't fix your problem. It can happen with most professions. If OP finds a doctor that resolves his issue all that negativity will go away.

Hyperbolic and self-invested or not, as much as doctors need to remember that patients are people, others need to realize humans are wearing those white coats. This kind of blanket condemnation is unwarranted and frankly my job sucks enough as it is.
Zoe
(04-21-2017, 01:16 PM)
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Originally Posted by Shogmaster

BMI is craptastic method to check for obesity. What year is this, 1985?

Obesity is not subjective.
Nosgotham
Member
(04-21-2017, 01:16 PM)
Ok so your symptom is under control mainly from taking a beta blocker? You still have no idea what the cause is though.

Most hypertension is essential but some cases can be determined as caused by actual defects shit. Which specialists have you gone to?
hockeypuck
Member
(04-21-2017, 01:20 PM)

Originally Posted by Rhaegar

Nothing like waking up getting ready to start a 28 hour shift in the ICU and reading that my 12 years of medical school and postgraduate training that has already cost me the price of an average mortgage and has reduced my earning potential and retirement planning all the way into my mid-30s to essentially zero is worthless. But that's okay, because my patients are appreciative and respect my sacrifices. Oh wait...

Thanks for reminding me that medicine was a bad choice.

Grow some thicker skin, this is nothing. And think about focusing your career on acute/emergency care, regardless of specialty. If patients are literally dying in front of you, they tend to be a little more grateful compared to the outpatient stuff.
TheOMan
Tagged as I see fit
(04-21-2017, 01:20 PM)
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OP, have you done a sleep study? You might want to get checked for Sleep Apnea.
komplanen
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(04-21-2017, 01:20 PM)
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Originally Posted by Zoe

Obesity is not subjective.

Are you trying to defend BMI? I don't want to sound like I'm on the offense, but if you think BMI is an accurate obesity meter then you ought to take a couple of minutes and do a little researching. Trust me, it'll only take a couple of minutes.
Shogmaster
Not genuinely interested in rational debate.
(04-21-2017, 01:21 PM)
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Originally Posted by Zoe

Obesity is not subjective.

Good luck defending use of BMI. According to BMI chart, someone like Arnold Swartznegger at his prime was obese.
Bane
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(04-21-2017, 01:23 PM)
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Originally Posted by Adam_Roman

Two years ago I told my doctor I've been feeling depressed, having breakdowns etc, she prescribed me lexapro. I took it and felt worse but stuck it out. Two weeks, still feel worse, by the time I got 6 weeks I stopped. I told her it made me feel worse and wanted to try something else if possible and she said "no the problem is the dosage. I'll double it." I didn't even pick it up.

Man, I was prescribed Lexapro once and I made me feel fucking horrible. I was just a mass of anxiety 24/7 for three days before I noticed anxiety was a possible side effect. I stopped taking it and started feeling better. Once I got to the therapist I'd scheduled a couple of days later he was quite happy I'd stopped. His exact words were "Lexapro can fuck you right up."
bigmit3737
Member
(04-21-2017, 01:24 PM)
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Look for another doctor. Do your own research and ask a lot of questions. They are good doctors but you have to keep looking.
Zoe
(04-21-2017, 01:24 PM)
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Originally Posted by Shogmaster

Good luck defending use of BMI. According to BMI chart, someone like Arnold Swartznegger at his prime was obese.

Somebody his size doesn't have the same medical needs as someone significantly slimmer. It doesn't matter that it's muscle.
Lockehardt
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(04-21-2017, 01:25 PM)
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Originally Posted by Shogmaster

BMI is craptastic method to check for obesity. What year is this, 1985? And over 140/90 is stage 2 hypertension.

You strike me as someone who generally doesn't accept responsibility for some or all of your problems. It's extremely telling that you claim to have never met a doctor you like. You came here for sympathy and have received some, but you also need to take some of the tougher advice given here. You've put on 25 pounds in 5 years, you continue that trend and it is unlikely that you see the other side of 60.
Shogmaster
Not genuinely interested in rational debate.
(04-21-2017, 01:26 PM)
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Originally Posted by Nosgotham

Ok so your symptom is under control mainly from taking a beta blocker? You still have no idea what the cause is though.

Most hypertension is essential but some cases can be determined as caused by actual defects shit. Which specialists have you gone to?

I was prodded for 4 days by Harbor UCLA's specialists, including their equivalent of House MD. I figure these guys know more about BP issues then any GP.

Originally Posted by TheOMan

OP, have you done a sleep study? You might want to get checked for Sleep Apnea.

No I haven't. I have snored quite a bit in my past but it not too bad now (no more sore throats in the morning). But I do want it done. It's just that insurance won't cover it. So I need a better job with a better insurance as well as a new doctor. :|
Shogmaster
Not genuinely interested in rational debate.
(04-21-2017, 01:27 PM)
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Originally Posted by Lockehardt

You strike me as someone who generally doesn't accept responsibility for some or all of your problems. It's extremely telling that you claim to have never met a doctor you like. You came here for sympathy and have received some, but you also need to take some of the tougher advice given here. You've put on 25 pounds in 5 years, you continue that trend and it is unlikely that you see the other side of 60.

I'm almost 50. Sue me. See how your metabolism shakes out at my age. I look perfectly normal at my age.
poppabk
Member
(04-21-2017, 01:33 PM)
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While doctors can be good or bad or everything in between like regular people, you have to accept that they do know more about medicine than you. What they don't have is the same investment in your health, which is why you need to constantly advocate for your own health, monitor it, and make as much effort as possible in your lifestyle choices. Change your doctor if you feel you need to, but don't start self medicating when your understanding of the medication is just something you read from a Google search.
sooperkool
Member
(04-21-2017, 01:37 PM)
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So you went to see some doctors and they couldn't figure it out but you went to another doctor and he did but doctors are useless?

That's kind of how medicine works.
TTG
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(04-21-2017, 01:40 PM)
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Originally Posted by Shogmaster

My home machine consistently reports about 20 points under machines at hospital and at my local Ralphs. I don't trust them.

This could be caused by anxiety rather than faulty blood pressure monitors. Speaking of which, you could as your doc for an anti anxiety medication for when things get really out of control, I find it works better than emergency doses of Hydralazine for a relative of mine. I'm not talking about a daily regimen, but in situations of extreme stress.

Besides that, I can only sympathize. In my experience, there's an absurdly high variance in medical care and competence in doctors in general. Scary to think about, but it's real. You just have to keep looking until you find a great doctor and then hang on to them for dear life. I wish that statement was more figurative than it actually is. Good luck OP.
Famassu
(04-21-2017, 01:42 PM)
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Originally Posted by Zoe

Obesity is not subjective.

BMI (alone) still isn't a very good way to measure obesity.

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