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FooTemps
Member
(07-11-2017, 05:07 AM)
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Originally Posted by Nerfgun

I just rest personally, and reset the count.

Here's a question for the thread: what do you guys do about water on a run?

My usual run is 8km (although I sometimes do 10km on weekends), less than an hour, and I don't take any water with me. I'll have a small glass before I go and that's that. Other running friend says this is A Real Bad Idea. I could chug a pint glass before I go but I really don't want to lug water with me, do I have to? I only occasionally feel thirsty. I sweat like a fountain though so I probably should. Or is it ok to just pre- and post-chug for 40-50 min runs?

I do 6k to 10k on my runs 4 days a week and never REALLY need water... Even on hot days, I'll just make a quick detour to a fountain. Just listen to your body and it should be fairly safe.

To help deal with hydration, I usually drink a good amount of water (2 pints?) an hour or two before my run. Make sure to pee before your run or you'll be sorry.
Limit
Member
(07-11-2017, 06:16 AM)
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My plantronics backbeat fit went kaput least week. Been researching for a few days for a new set of headphones with running specifically in mind. I was close to pulling trigger on bose soundsport but read that wind noise is a big issue with them. I am now almost of the opinion that backbeat fit are still currently the best headphones for running. Anyone has any recommendations for me to research any other set of headphones?
BrassDragon
Member
(07-11-2017, 08:50 AM)
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Originally Posted by Limit

My plantronics backbeat fit went kaput least week. Been researching for a few days for a new set of headphones with running specifically in mind. I was close to pulling trigger on bose soundsport but read that wind noise is a big issue with them. I am now almost of the opinion that backbeat fit are still currently the best headphones for running. Anyone has any recommendations for me to research any other set of headphones?

I wear my Aftershokz Trekz Titanium everywhere. They work though bone induction instead of blasting noise into your ear canal and are perfect for running. No issue with wind or walking in a sound bubble without awareness. Also wireless and quickly charged through USB. Only downside is that the bass is not as kicking as regular headphones, which might upset some audiophiles... but for running, it's fine.

Limit
Member
(07-11-2017, 10:28 AM)
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Bought. Thanks for the recommendation. They sound cool. Let's see if they sound cool as well.
isaacnukem
Member
(07-11-2017, 02:44 PM)
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Originally Posted by Nerfgun

I just rest personally, and reset the count.

Here's a question for the thread: what do you guys do about water on a run?

My usual run is 8km (although I sometimes do 10km on weekends), less than an hour, and I don't take any water with me. I'll have a small glass before I go and that's that. Other running friend says this is A Real Bad Idea. I could chug a pint glass before I go but I really don't want to lug water with me, do I have to? I only occasionally feel thirsty. I sweat like a fountain though so I probably should. Or is it ok to just pre- and post-chug for 40-50 min runs?

Thanks for answering! I usually tell myself I'll do 3km but I end up doing the whole 5km when I'm there, heh.

Anyway, I haven't brought water yet but being thirsty on the run is probably the worst feeling I can get while running. It really messes up with everything. I try to hydrate myself before running because the feeling of gasping for water is awful.
Shanks D Zoro
Banned
(07-11-2017, 02:51 PM)

Originally Posted by Fisico

Wew.
So I'm now living in Japan and more specifically Tokyo, considering the weather (temperature never goes below 25 and is >30 most of the time, it also feels +5 because of humidity) it's near impossible to run outside asides from some park it would have been hard anyway.

So I ran on a treadmill for the first time the other day.

Holy shit it's painful, sweating like I never sweated before, both legs and cardio were ok, I had a bottle with me so I could drink but... I dunno just felt pretty bad the entire time (ran >11k in ~50mn), had to slow down a little bit (<14km/h) do you get used to it with time or will it stay like that?

I wasn't enthusiastic to begin with because it's pretty boring but if it's painful on top of that my motivation will drop like a rock :(

I experience the same conditions in Korea. I actually run outside with a hoodie on. I love building up a sweat. I do remember feeling sick the first time I ran in those conditions years ago, so I think your body can get use to it.
Fisico
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(07-11-2017, 05:08 PM)
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Originally Posted by Shanks D Zoro

I experience the same conditions in Korea. I actually run outside with a hoodie on. I love building up a sweat. I do remember feeling sick the first time I ran in those conditions years ago, so I think your body can get use to it.

Thanks for the reply, even with a hoodie lol, but if you love it that must be effective indeed!
I ran on a treadmill once again today (I will wait for September before trying outside I guess), managed my pace better and it wasn't as awful as the first time but I still sweated a tremendous amount :(
The problem is that I want to run a lot to prepare for my next marathon in late October, but with outside being a no-no for now, treadmill being limited to 1h (so maybe up to 14-15k if I go all out) I will not be able to have too long running sessions.

Maybe I'll try to find a half by then but it may already be too late.
TheOnlyOneHeEverFeared
Member
(07-11-2017, 05:18 PM)
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How do you lot keep your pace reasonable at the beginning of the run? I run way better if I keep a decent pace all the way through, rather than sprinting at the start and then getting way down after 2 or 3 miles, but when I go from warm up to actual running, I tend to sprint out of instinct or whatever.
FooTemps
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(07-11-2017, 07:32 PM)
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Originally Posted by TheOnlyOneHeEverFeared

How do you lot keep your pace reasonable at the beginning of the run? I run way better if I keep a decent pace all the way through, rather than sprinting at the start and then getting way down after 2 or 3 miles, but when I go from warm up to actual running, I tend to sprint out of instinct or whatever.

I've seen people handle cadence control a handful of ways:
  1. Music: Run to the beat to help regulate your cadence. Find a song that is roughly 165 bpm to get a pace for 9:00 min/mi. Slower BPM > Slower pace, Faster BPM > Faster pace.
  2. Counting Time: Like music, but just in your head. It's a lot more boring but if you've done marching band or play drums, you're probably used to it already so cadence control should be second nature. Takes a few runs of counting to really develop a good sense of cadence to time using this method.
  3. Conversation Rule: Try talking to a partner while running. If you can't manage more than a few words, you should slow down until you can start speaking in sentences while running. A conversation pace will keep you in the right range for cardio. If you have no one to talk to, try singing a song.

I personally count time or chant a mantra like, "Take it easy, nice and slow," to keep myself from speeding up. I have to actively remind myself to keep an easy pace or I'll just wreck my body since I'm still not used to piling on the miles.

Originally Posted by BrassDragon

Running at easy pace is a separate skill, it's not something you can just do even when you've been running for a while. Most people just default to medium effort with big breaths and a lot of sweat. When I started incorporating long, slow runs it took me about 5 weeks before I could do it consistently and without overthinking it.

One trick that helped me was running with my mouth closed most of the time (only inhaling through the nose and gently releasing the breath through my lips.) Another trick is chewing gum (you can't chew when you're breathing hard.) .

Breathing technique is really useful, that completely slipped my mind. It helps control your pace and helps keep you from choking on flies constantly in the summer, lol.
BrassDragon
Member
(07-11-2017, 10:15 PM)
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Originally Posted by TheOnlyOneHeEverFeared

How do you lot keep your pace reasonable at the beginning of the run? I run way better if I keep a decent pace all the way through, rather than sprinting at the start and then getting way down after 2 or 3 miles, but when I go from warm up to actual running, I tend to sprint out of instinct or whatever.

Running at easy pace is a separate skill, it's not something you can just do even when you've been running for a while. Most people just default to medium effort with big breaths and a lot of sweat. When I started incorporating long, slow runs it took me about 5 weeks before I could do it consistently and without overthinking it.

One trick that helped me was running with my mouth closed most of the time (only inhaling through the nose and gently releasing the breath through my lips.) Another trick is chewing gum (you can't chew when you're breathing hard.)

A more advanced thing you can do is reduce your vertical displacement - chances are you're running fast in 'gazelle mode' with quite a lot of air time between foot strikes. Try deliberately sticking closer to the ground by keeping the knees lower, running in 'glider mode'. Teaching yourself a slightly different way of running is a pretty powerful tool because after some practice, you can accelerate and decelerate effortlessly by switching up technique.
tmarg
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(07-11-2017, 11:57 PM)
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Originally Posted by BrassDragon


One trick that helped me was running with my mouth closed most of the time (only inhaling through the nose and gently releasing the breath through my lips.) Another trick is chewing gum (you can't chew when you're breathing hard.)

Every time I've chewed gum while running I've ended up biting myself. Which I suppose would be an effective reminder to slow down, but not a particularly pleasant one.
isaacnukem
Member
(07-12-2017, 12:03 AM)
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I agree with music. Just make sure to still maintain your breathing!
Shanks D Zoro
Banned
(07-12-2017, 02:11 PM)

Originally Posted by BrassDragon

Running at easy pace is a separate skill, it's not something you can just do even when you've been running for a while. Most people just default to medium effort with big breaths and a lot of sweat. When I started incorporating long, slow runs it took me about 5 weeks before I could do it consistently and without overthinking it.

One trick that helped me was running with my mouth closed most of the time (only inhaling through the nose and gently releasing the breath through my lips.) Another trick is chewing gum (you can't chew when you're breathing hard.)

A more advanced thing you can do is reduce your vertical displacement - chances are you're running fast in 'gazelle mode' with quite a lot of air time between foot strikes. Try deliberately sticking closer to the ground by keeping the knees lower, running in 'glider mode'. Teaching yourself a slightly different way of running is a pretty powerful tool because after some practice, you can accelerate and decelerate effortlessly by switching up technique.

Running slow has been so hard to do, I am still running faster than the recommended paces, but a lot slower than what I would normally do. Interesting you say it took you five weeks. I have been at it about 4 weeks now and hopefully with another couple of long runs coming up I can hit the recommended pace.
mdsfx
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(07-12-2017, 02:16 PM)
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I use my gps watch religiously to keep track of my pace. Probably not good to always rely on, but your start to quickly get a feel for your pace after using it enough.
TheCochese
Banned
(07-12-2017, 02:39 PM)

Originally Posted by Limit

My plantronics backbeat fit went kaput least week. Been researching for a few days for a new set of headphones with running specifically in mind. I was close to pulling trigger on bose soundsport but read that wind noise is a big issue with them. I am now almost of the opinion that backbeat fit are still currently the best headphones for running. Anyone has any recommendations for me to research any other set of headphones?

These have become my all time favorites. I use them for anything, and should really buy a backup pair. I own like six different Anker sets.

https://www.amazon.com/Anker-SoundBu.../dp/B01IUP89LS
Shanks D Zoro
Banned
(07-12-2017, 03:30 PM)
http://blog.smashrun.com

Interesting, I had wondered why the Nike runs i was eventually getting onto Strava were not accurate. Also, why i couldn't use my primary source of http://nike.vinz.xyz to import.
TheOnlyOneHeEverFeared
Member
(07-12-2017, 03:44 PM)
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Originally Posted by FooTemps

I've seen people handle cadence control a handful of ways:

  1. Music: Run to the beat to help regulate your cadence. Find a song that is roughly 165 bpm to get a pace for 9:00 min/mi. Slower BPM > Slower pace, Faster BPM > Faster pace.
  2. Counting Time: Like music, but just in your head. It's a lot more boring but if you've done marching band or play drums, you're probably used to it already so cadence control should be second nature. Takes a few runs of counting to really develop a good sense of cadence to time using this method.
  3. Conversation Rule: Try talking to a partner while running. If you can't manage more than a few words, you should slow down until you can start speaking in sentences while running. A conversation pace will keep you in the right range for cardio. If you have no one to talk to, try singing a song.

I personally count time or chant a mantra like, "Take it easy, nice and slow," to keep myself from speeding up. I have to actively remind myself to keep an easy pace or I'll just wreck my body since I'm still not used to piling on the miles.



Breathing technique is really useful, that completely slipped my mind. It helps control your pace and helps keep you from choking on flies constantly in the summer, lol.

Originally Posted by BrassDragon

Running at easy pace is a separate skill, it's not something you can just do even when you've been running for a while. Most people just default to medium effort with big breaths and a lot of sweat. When I started incorporating long, slow runs it took me about 5 weeks before I could do it consistently and without overthinking it.

One trick that helped me was running with my mouth closed most of the time (only inhaling through the nose and gently releasing the breath through my lips.) Another trick is chewing gum (you can't chew when you're breathing hard.)

A more advanced thing you can do is reduce your vertical displacement - chances are you're running fast in 'gazelle mode' with quite a lot of air time between foot strikes. Try deliberately sticking closer to the ground by keeping the knees lower, running in 'glider mode'. Teaching yourself a slightly different way of running is a pretty powerful tool because after some practice, you can accelerate and decelerate effortlessly by switching up technique.


That's awesome, thank you.
mdsfx
Member
(07-12-2017, 07:57 PM)
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Originally Posted by GatorBait

Thanks for the feedback - I recognize you from Fitness GAF and your training regimen, especially the variety of it, was always something I was impressed with and aspire to.

I missed this - thanks so much for the compliment!
FooTemps
Member
(07-13-2017, 05:36 AM)
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So I've been running a 9 week base building program in order to try to hit 30-40 miles a week. The first couple weeks asks for easy effort over lengths of 4 miles and 7 miles with a few training exercises like strides and fartleks. In the later weeks though, it asks for some "very easy" and "jog" runs. It seems like I should either be going faster on my easy efforts or jogging is actually like an 11:00+ min/mi pace. How slow is jogging supposed to be?

I'm currently running between 9:30 and 10:30 min/mi pace for my easy runs.
Fistwell
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(07-13-2017, 06:57 AM)
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Originally Posted by FooTemps

So I've been running a 9 week base building program in order to try to hit 30-40 miles a week. The first couple weeks asks for easy effort over lengths of 4 miles and 7 miles with a few training exercises like strides and fartleks. In the later weeks though, it asks for some "very easy" and "jog" runs. It seems like I should either be going faster on my easy efforts or jogging is actually like an 11:00+ min/mi pace. How slow is jogging supposed to be?

I'm currently running between 9:30 and 10:30 min/mi pace for my easy runs.

The easiest way to get an idea of your different training paces is to lookup an online calculator and enter a recent race time. That'll tell you your easy pace, from which you can deduct "very easy."

Edit: Got blindsided by the fact that the 10K I'm running is actually at the end of next week, thought I had more time. Squeezed in one last quality session cple of days ago, now taking it easy. At 33Km by Friday night I'm feeling like a lazy bum but I'll get over it.

Unrelated but anyone else lurking LRC forums? That fucking place. The layers of bullshit. That guy here seemed sketchy, explanation by PortlandXCGirl down the page reminded me of why that story sounded familiar. This guy, Jesus, I don't even. Not erh... subtle? Parrots the "running on hate" meme like an idiot (kinda like me...). But I can't help but be entertained. JS "the coach," Island the coachee, fatass, etc. just so many comedy characters. A carnival of buffoons and bullshit.

I love that shit!
isaacnukem
Member
(07-16-2017, 01:06 PM)
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So, what are speed training and interval trainings? I think what I'm doing is the so called distance run because I always just hit a 5 km goal every time I run.
panda-zebra
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(07-16-2017, 02:12 PM)
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Originally Posted by Fistwell

Unrelated but anyone else lurking LRC forums? That fucking place. The layers of bullshit.

wowowowow.

trying hard to tear myself away for all that shite!
Duebrithil
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(07-16-2017, 02:21 PM)
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Originally Posted by Fistwell

Unrelated but anyone else lurking LRC forums? That fucking place. The layers of bullshit. That guy here seemed sketchy, explanation by PortlandXCGirl down the page reminded me of why that story sounded familiar. This guy, Jesus, I don't even. Not erh... subtle? Parrots the "running on hate" meme like an idiot (kinda like me...). But I can't help but be entertained. JS "the coach," Island the coachee, fatass, etc. just so many comedy characters. A carnival of buffoons and bullshit.

I love that shit!

Man, those people really have time to think about everyone around them. When I run I just run, IDGAF if other people are running faster, slower or upside-down.

Originally Posted by isaacnukem

So, what are speed training and interval trainings? I think what I'm doing is the so called distance run because I always just hit a 5 km goal every time I run.

Speed training are those workouts with the main goal of rising your top running speed. In particular interval training refers to that structured training in which the runner alternates "sprints" (or runs at a certain pace) of distances that vary between 100-800m and periods of walking rest.
BrassDragon
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(07-16-2017, 02:34 PM)
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Originally Posted by isaacnukem

So, what are speed training and interval trainings? I think what I'm doing is the so called distance run because I always just hit a 5 km goal every time I run.

Speed/tempo/tresholds runs are meant to increase your metabolic fitness. As you run, eventually your muscles cannot keep up with the amount acidic by-products your effort generates and they stop contracting (which you feel as fatigue, sometimes combined with pain as the still-active muscles try to compensate for the muscles that are giving out.) The moment your muscles can no longer cope is called the lactic treshold.

If you always do the same mid-level effort 5K run, you get some fitness benefit but you never increase your lactic treshold, which limits your ability to either run faster or longer.

Speed runs make your heart work faster (so you won't last as long as your regular training) which pushes you over the lactic treshold earlier. By pushing into that (uncomfortable but not intolerable) zone at holding for as long as you can, you teach your muscles to become more efficient at processing the by-products which means they keep contracting for a longer period - you've pushed up your lactic treshold and can now run faster/longer as desired.

To help you spend more time in that zone, you can try intervals of speed runs instead of one continuous speed run - every time you peak into the lactic treshold zone, you take a few minutes to recover back to a regular heartbeat (and your muscles get a chance to purge) before you try for another push.

Since it's not the most fun thing you can do while running most recreational runners limit the amount of speedwork but it's good to schedule them regularly because they make a huge difference in how your normal runs feel.

LRC is ridiculous. Didn't realize it was still around.
FooTemps
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(07-16-2017, 08:45 PM)
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Originally Posted by Fistwell

Unrelated but anyone else lurking LRC forums? That fucking place. The layers of bullshit. That guy here seemed sketchy, explanation by PortlandXCGirl down the page reminded me of why that story sounded familiar. This guy, Jesus, I don't even. Not erh... subtle? Parrots the "running on hate" meme like an idiot (kinda like me...). But I can't help but be entertained. JS "the coach," Island the coachee, fatass, etc. just so many comedy characters. A carnival of buffoons and bullshit.

I love that shit!

Holy shit... people are actually like this? Everyone in Seattle is so anti-social that we barely even say hi on our runs, let alone doing a random challenge. Sometimes I get caught up in someone's pace if I end up following them, but I usually catch myself and go back to my normal stride and cadence.
isaacnukem
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(07-16-2017, 11:43 PM)
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Originally Posted by Duebrithil

Speed training are those workouts with the main goal of rising your top running speed. In particular interval training refers to that structured training in which the runner alternates "sprints" (or runs at a certain pace) of distances that vary between 100-800m and periods of walking rest.

Oh, so it seems I started running with interval training. I actually managed to pull off 12 km on my third run because of intervals. Then I felt hot the next day, heh.

Originally Posted by BrassDragon

Speed/tempo/tresholds runs are meant to increase your metabolic fitness. As you run, eventually your muscles cannot keep up with the amount acidic by-products your effort generates and they stop contracting (which you feel as fatigue, sometimes combined with pain as the still-active muscles try to compensate for the muscles that are giving out.) The moment your muscles can no longer cope is called the lactic treshold.

If you always do the same mid-level effort 5K run, you get some fitness benefit but you never increase your lactic treshold, which limits your ability to either run faster or longer.

Speed runs make your heart work faster (so you won't last as long as your regular training) which pushes you over the lactic treshold earlier. By pushing into that (uncomfortable but not intolerable) zone at holding for as long as you can, you teach your muscles to become more efficient at processing the by-products which means they keep contracting for a longer period - you've pushed up your lactic treshold and can now run faster/longer as desired.

To help you spend more time in that zone, you can try intervals of speed runs instead of one continuous speed run - every time you peak into the lactic treshold zone, you take a few minutes to recover back to a regular heartbeat (and your muscles get a chance to purge) before you try for another push.

Since it's not the most fun thing you can do while running most recreational runners limit the amount of speedwork but it's good to schedule them regularly because they make a huge difference in how your normal runs feel.

What happens if you reach the lactic threshold? Do you get side-stitches and maybe puke? Because I probably reached it once and I experienced those. I just want to mix things up because my schedule is I run long runs for MWF(5 km) then TThS I'm on the gym.

Thanks to you both for your explanations :)
mdsfx
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(07-16-2017, 11:50 PM)
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Speaking of lactic threshold, my VO2 Max test results came in. 61! I'm surprised. I've used calculaters based on race times that always estimated it around 45. Not really sure what to do with this number though. They gave me some heart rate zones which might be useful.
BrassDragon
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(07-17-2017, 12:41 AM)
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Originally Posted by isaacnukem

Oh, so it seems I started running with interval training. I actually managed to pull off 12 km on my third run because of intervals. Then I felt hot the next day, heh.

What happens if you reach the lactic threshold? Do you get side-stitches and maybe puke? Because I probably reached it once and I experienced those. I just want to mix things up because my schedule is I run long runs for MWF(5 km) then TThS I'm on the gym.

Thanks to you both for your explanations :)

Side-stitches and puking are the result of digestive problems; either you eat too much before a run (or run too soon after eating) or you're not eating/drinking the right things.

When you push yourself to run at lactic treshold, your oxygen-starved muscles swell up and your overall flexibility goes down (you'll notice losing the 'bounce' of a pleasant run.) You might get some mild pain around the joints (because the muscles are not absorbing the shocks of footfalls adequately due to stiffness causing the knees/hips to take more hits.) I sometimes a get a runny nose or teary eyes (apparently all the blood vessels swell up to get more oxygen in, including the tiny capillaries in your face.)

The real pain usually happens after when you begin to recover. It's not a constant sensation but your muscles will be insanely sensitive, you won't be able to push your fingers into your leg tissue or have a loved one jump on your lap without you flinching. Walking up stairs is also painful for a day or so because the recovering muscles tug at your joints more.

Man, isn't running fun?
Fistwell
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(07-17-2017, 06:54 AM)
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Originally Posted by mdsfx

Speaking of lactic threshold, my VO2 Max test results came in. 61! I'm surprised. I've used calculaters based on race times that always estimated it around 45. Not really sure what to do with this number though. They gave me some heart rate zones which might be useful.

Your speed or pace is (mainly) the factor of 2 things: your VO2max (roughly, a measure of how much energy you're able to burn over time), and your running efficiency or economy (how much you're able to do with the energy you burn). If your times correspond to a "VO2max" that's lower than the one from the test, that means you have room to improve you running efficiency. Some people like to say that VO2max is actually near meaningless, that 'pace@VO2max' is a better predictor of performance. Then there's Jack Daniel's Vdot which mixes VO2max and economy, based on recent race times.

In short: Look, it's complicated. :)
Fewr
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(07-17-2017, 04:51 PM)
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Any gaffers doing the San Francisco marathon this weekend?
I've signed up and am looking forward to it.

I'm not into achieving an amazing time or anything competitive, I just want to take a leisurely pace take photos and get to know the city.
Barrel Cannon
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(07-17-2017, 05:02 PM)
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I didn't know we had a running thread till now. In the way that Simpsons has a scene for everything, GAF too has an OT for everything.

I was thinking of buying a pair of running shoes this year. I disabled all my work benefits which entitles me to about $700 on sports/fitness related stuff. I was thinking of buying 1 or 2 pairs of running shoes and just putting the rest towards gym accessories(shorts/gloves etc).

Anyone have any recommendations, I would want it to be suitable for pavement and non-paved trails as there are a lot of non-paved trails in my area that I intend to run through.
Fewr
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(07-17-2017, 07:03 PM)
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My philosophy is try a few pairs and ask yourself if you'd feel comfortable running for 2+ hrs or whatever amount of time is your goal.

I'm no expert, but I think Adidas are good enough for beginners, or at least they felt pretty good for me when I started.

Everyone has different preferences. I tend to gravitate towards saucony and Adidas.

Look for buy one get one free or half off deals do you can try two brands and pick one for training and the other for gym and everyday activities. (or both for training and alternate using both)
thestopsign
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(07-17-2017, 07:11 PM)
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I've been slowly upping weekly mileage for my half at the beginning of August. I am super worried about it. At this rate I can still barely run 4 miles without my legs giving out. I also am losing about 3-4 lbs of sweat on a 35 minute run. I need to start bringing water with me in some form because this Mississppi heat and humidity is brutal.
Horsefly
Member
(07-17-2017, 07:24 PM)

Originally Posted by Fewr

Everyone has different preferences. I tend to gravitate towards saucony and Adidas.

Ditto on the Saucony recommendation. Brook Adrenaline seem to be a recommended all rounder this year as well.

Originally Posted by thestopsign

I've been slowly upping weekly mileage for my half at the beginning of August. I am super worried about it. At this rate I can still barely run 4 miles without my legs giving out. I also am losing about 3-4 lbs of sweat on a 35 minute run. I need to start bringing water with me in some form because this Mississppi heat and humidity is brutal.

Damn, and I have trouble in U.K. summer! Have you adapted your diet to help retain hydration? Seemed to help me but I think I'm comparing apples to oranges with regards to comparative heat levels
Nerfgun
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(07-17-2017, 07:32 PM)
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Originally Posted by Fistwell

Unrelated but anyone else lurking LRC forums? That fucking place. The layers of bullshit. That guy here seemed sketchy, explanation by PortlandXCGirl down the page reminded me of why that story sounded familiar. This guy, Jesus, I don't even. Not erh... subtle? Parrots the "running on hate" meme like an idiot (kinda like me...). But I can't help but be entertained. JS "the coach," Island the coachee, fatass, etc. just so many comedy characters. A carnival of buffoons and bullshit.

I love that shit!

I had no idea there was so much drama happening in people's heads around me.

I just thought it was sort of funny that all the other runners wave to me. Waving is a real thing around here. Like, in a Hail Hydra sort way.
Red_taiyaki
Member
(07-17-2017, 10:27 PM)
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Ugh, developed some acute bronchitis over the weekend and haven't been able to get any running in after my Saturday 8 miler.

Freaking sucks knowing that I'll have to take some time off to rest up- but would rather lose time now than before my next HM in August I guess....

Didn't even realize that summer bronchitis is an actual thing though.
FooTemps
Member
(07-17-2017, 10:46 PM)
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Originally Posted by Red_taiyaki

Ugh, developed some acute bronchitis over the weekend and haven't been able to get any running in after my Saturday 8 miler.

Freaking sucks knowing that I'll have to take some time off to rest up- but would rather lose time now than before my next HM in August I guess....

Didn't even realize that summer bronchitis is an actual thing though.

I got set back a couple days from illness too, though I just caught a cold. It suuuuuucks. Missed out on 13 miles of good running over the weekend.
TheOnlyOneHeEverFeared
Member
(07-17-2017, 10:57 PM)
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I did 8.15 miles yesterday, then 5 today, plus 4 miles walking today and 4 miles walking yesterday. Not sure I'll do any tomorrow.
MyleMan1010
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(07-17-2017, 11:02 PM)
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I'm extremely flat-footed and my feet fall asleep around the 5K mark. Does anyone else have this problem and have a solution? I want to reach the 10K mark by the end of summer, but my issue is holding me back a bit. I ran a ton a few years ago and was able to go over 6 miles by just pushing past the sleeping feet thing. I'm starting to worry about injuring myself and not knowing it because I cant feel anything.
isaacnukem
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(07-18-2017, 12:04 AM)
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Originally Posted by BrassDragon

Side-stitches and puking are the result of digestive problems; either you eat too much before a run (or run too soon after eating) or you're not eating/drinking the right things.

When you push yourself to run at lactic treshold, your oxygen-starved muscles swell up and your overall flexibility goes down (you'll notice losing the 'bounce' of a pleasant run.) You might get some mild pain around the joints (because the muscles are not absorbing the shocks of footfalls adequately due to stiffness causing the knees/hips to take more hits.) I sometimes a get a runny nose or teary eyes (apparently all the blood vessels swell up to get more oxygen in, including the tiny capillaries in your face.)

The real pain usually happens after when you begin to recover. It's not a constant sensation but your muscles will be insanely sensitive, you won't be able to push your fingers into your leg tissue or have a loved one jump on your lap without you flinching. Walking up stairs is also painful for a day or so because the recovering muscles tug at your joints more.

Man, isn't running fun?

Hmm. Maybe when I did the 3km/8km/12km succession in 3 days I did this. I actually think mixing things up would make running more fun for me. I don't really want to compete anywhere, I am just doing this for endurance for hiking, but if I can do this to make myself better, I'll do it. Thanks, once again, for the wonderful explanation. I learn a lot from you folks :)

PS: yeah I ate McDonalds that day and the food didn't agree with me haha
panda-zebra
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(07-18-2017, 08:10 AM)
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Only just feeling almost like I'd be back to normal now after that horrible virus, feel like I can kick a little and push harder, but it's going to take some time to get back to where I was and that's a little demotivating, as is the bright sunshine looking out of the window!

Originally Posted by MyleMan1010

I'm extremely flat-footed and my feet fall asleep around the 5K mark. Does anyone else have this problem and have a solution? I want to reach the 10K mark by the end of summer, but my issue is holding me back a bit. I ran a ton a few years ago and was able to go over 6 miles by just pushing past the sleeping feet thing. I'm starting to worry about injuring myself and not knowing it because I cant feel anything.

I had an issue with feet going numb around 4 miles in to any run at any pace, went on for months. Podiatrist at a race said it was swelling acting on nerves. No matter how loose I did my laces up it always came on.My 5yo son fixed it for me - told me to roll my feet over one of these hand-held rollers:

It actually worked. Hurt like crazy at first, but after just a few days the problem went away and never came back. Was told later that doing similar with tennis balls and later golf balls can work. Hope it helps.

EDIT: and running on feet that are completely numb, I know that feeling well, it's horrible, feels like you're wearing a plaster cast.
isaacnukem
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(07-20-2017, 07:05 AM)
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Gonna run my first run soon! 10 km. Shooting for 1 hour and 30 minutes. I'll let you know what happens.
FooTemps
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(07-21-2017, 08:22 AM)
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5.1 mi @ 9.28... the base is building slowly but surely. Seattle marathon here I come! #stillnipplechafing I seriously need some lube or bandaids lol
Fistwell
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(07-21-2017, 08:30 AM)
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10K coming up this Sunday, weather forecast keeps changing. Down to 22C with showers, which I could live with. Went out for an easy tempo on Wednesday. Got completely out of control, ran the first K 10s faster than target pace. Feeling relaxed but feeling slow somehow (thought I was in the 4:20s when the watch said 3:50s). Blew up after a mile. It was 34C.

Hopefully temperature is more reasonable on Sunday. Some rain would be great. Also need to have more discipline and keep an eye on my pace.

Edit:

Originally Posted by isaacnukem

Gonna run my first run soon! 10 km. Shooting for 1 hour and 30 minutes. I'll let you know what happens.

Best of luck!

Originally Posted by FooTemps

5.1 mi @ 9.28... the base is building slowly but surely. Seattle marathon here I come! #stillnipplechafing I seriously need some lube or bandaids lol

The problem I have with bandaids is that they rub off after like 10-15Km. I should shave my chest, the hair is getting in the way.

Originally Posted by panda-zebra

I had an issue with feet going numb around 4 miles in to any run at any pace, went on for months. Podiatrist at a race said it was swelling acting on nerves. No matter how loose I did my laces up it always came on.My 5yo son fixed it for me - told me to roll my feet over one of these hand-held rollers:
...
It actually worked. Hurt like crazy at first, but after just a few days the problem went away and never came back. Was told later that doing similar with tennis balls and later golf balls can work. Hope it helps.

Looks like medieval torture! :D
Duebrithil
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(07-21-2017, 09:30 AM)
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Originally Posted by Fistwell

10K coming up this Sunday, weather forecast keeps changing. Down to 22C with showers, which I could live with. Went out for an easy tempo on Wednesday. Got completely out of control, ran the first K 10s faster than target pace. Feeling relaxed but feeling slow somehow (thought I was in the 4:20s when the watch said 3:50s). Blew up after a mile. It was 34C.

Hopefully temperature is more reasonable on Sunday. Some rain would be great. Also need to have more discipline and keep an eye on my pace.

I've found rain to be a double edged sword more often than not. Let's hope you can pull a PB weather permitting, or at least run comfortably without too much heat.

Originally Posted by Fistwell

The problem I have with bandaids is that they rub off after like 10-15Km. I should shave my chest, the hair is getting in the way.

Really? I've found the hair on my nipples acts as a buffer between the sweat and the shirt. Never had a problem with chaffing :D
Fistwell
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(07-21-2017, 10:39 AM)
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Originally Posted by Duebrithil

I've found rain to be a double edged sword more often than not. Let's hope you can pull a PB weather permitting, or at least run comfortably without too much heat.

Yeah depends on how much rain. Some rain to cool things down would be good, pouring rain not so great.

Originally Posted by Duebrithil

Really? I've found the hair on my nipples acts as a buffer between the sweat and the shirt. Never had a problem with chaffing :D

The hair's getting in the way of the bandaid sticking. :(
Duebrithil
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(07-21-2017, 01:36 PM)
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Originally Posted by Fistwell

The hair's getting in the way of the bandaid sticking. :(

Oh! Carry on then
isaacnukem
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(07-21-2017, 02:56 PM)
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So I just bought my first pair of running shoes(Ghost 9) and I like them but it seems I might have messed up with the size. Sometimes, I feel some of my fingers slightly touching the front of the shoe. I should've gotten a larger size, but I'll check if I can live with this and I can adjust by tightening the lace so my feet won't slide.

Originally Posted by Fistwell

Best of luck!

Thanks! Good luck to you too :)
TheCochese
Banned
(07-21-2017, 03:15 PM)
Trying to figure out if it's smart to try for a 5K in three weeks. I've only been running on a treadmill this year, and have gotten up to 11 minutes straight. Not recently though, as I got sick and took a couple weeks off. Tuesday I was back up to 7:30 and could have gone longer.

Only reason I'm even considering it is it would be my birthday. I've never done a race before.
Rmagnus
Banned
(07-21-2017, 03:16 PM)

Originally Posted by TheCochese

Trying to figure out if it's smart to try for a 5K in three weeks. I've only been running on a treadmill this year, and have gotten up to 11 minutes straight. Not recently though, as I got sick and took a couple weeks off. Tuesday I was back up to 7:30 and could have gone longer.

Only reason I'm even considering it is it would be my birthday. I've never done a race before.

Go for it, just enjoy the run. You don't really need to push that hard, just at a constant pace will do!

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