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Ridley327
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(07-04-2017, 02:30 PM)
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XX: Anthology time!

The Box: The spookiest of the four shorts by a considerable margin, and easily the most consistent in tone. The story, adapted from a Jack Ketchum tale, concerns a family that is set upon by a mysterious malady that resulted from the youngest peering into the titular object during a chance encounter. This isn't the kind of story that's overly concerned with what is actually in there and more about the collateral damage that it leaves, with a particular emphasis on the growing distance between those that don't know of its contents and those that do. There's also a rather pointed stab at rampant consumerism in the various meals being presented at various junctures, looking like a little much for a family twice the size the one here, lending it a nicely uneasy sensation that accentuates the mounting doom occurring within the home. This is pretty solid stuff at the end of the day, though I think this could have stood to be a bit more focused on just one character for its entire duration, rather than the last third, as it felt like a missed opportunity to not have a better idea of why the mother feels the way she does about the evolving situation.

The Birthday Party: The things we do to give our kids a nice party! The directorial debut for the woman sometimes known as St. Vincent makes a striking argument for a desire to have it be her last, as this one-joke flop takes an eternity to get to that joke. Along the way is a lot of painfully forced quirky humor that fails to launch, leaving the talented Melanie Lynskey adrift in a sea of bad gags that she can barely keep her head above. It all culminates with a finale that suggests someone's first time playing around with the slow motion button on their camera, along with a setup for a situation that doesn't begin to make sense (no one thought to wonder about the strangely still panda suit sitting at the table, really?) before the film concludes and reveals the joke that it spent nearly 20 minutes setting up. As it turns out, they could have saved themselves a lot of time, effort and hard drive space on their camera by starting with that. Dreadful, but not of the intentional variety.

Don't Fall: College students go where they're not supposed to, then die. Despite a cool title drop, there's really nothing particularly remarkable about this one. It's hardly the worst of its particular type, but it's so dull that it makes it hard to recommend even at its short length. Really surprised at how thoroughly uninteresting this wound up, as director Roxanne Benjamin turned in one of the better segments in Southbound. I honestly wish there was something worthwhile to talk about with this one.

His Only Living Son: Karyn Kusama continues her interesting streak into horror with this one, concerning a mother whose son is starting to grow up into the kind of thing that she was always afraid he'd become. This one plays a bit of a long game, and long enough where suggesting an alternate title would be more than enough to give up the game entirely, but this one does strike me as the one where the story concept seems fairly hobbled by having to fit it all into the 20-ish minutes that it runs. There's a lot of intrigue regarding the setting that gets sidelined almost as soon as it's introduced, and though you get enough of the backstory to be able to piece together what went down and led the mother and her son to the lives they lead, it never really feels like there's quite enough pressure being applied to them to make their situation feel desperate enough (not helping: the supporting cast hams it up to baffling heights, marking too strange a contrast from the more serious drama). The short does well for itself with its unconventional finale that does hit a nice emotional chord, but even as it ends, one gets the feeling that it could have been and should have been even better had it gotten even just 10 more minutes to elaborate. As it is, it's a nice idea that feels compromised enough to impact its effectiveness.

Overall: One of those anthology ideas that's great on paper but perhaps even more uneven than some anthologies have been, thanks to having two outright duds occupying the space between the two better stories.
lordxar
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(07-04-2017, 03:25 PM)
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Being Elite and Dangerous tends to soak up movie time and now that I'm really into July I realized how far back into June I watched my last film which I rectified with Blue Sunshine today. Don't eat the acid...its killer! Heard of this back over a Halloween marathon and Shudder laid it on me the other day so I put this tab on my tongue and let the ride begin. What should have been merged with Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas for a modern slasher film high as fuck on whatever this really just dealt with the after effects of the 60's when everyone straightened their shit out. Overall I thought the story was awesome but the film needs work. Like the main guy is running from the cops who we barely see. Feels like there needs to be more cat and mouse...well more cat anyway. Would love to see a good modern director remake this into something glorious.

Now to catch up on June. I logged 15 films which includes some shorts so I really didn't watch that much.

1. Doctor Strange
2. The Prestige
3. The Bucket List
4. XX
5. Beyond the Gates

So technically the Prestige is a better film but Doctor Strange really delivered for me.
FutureLarking
Junior Member
(07-04-2017, 03:31 PM)

Originally Posted by ronaldthump

Didn't have issues with Jake's performance. Even Tilda was OTT. 6/10

Didn't mind Tilda, but I couldn't get over thinking Jake was doing a terrible Ace Ventura parody that just didn't gel at all with the tone of the film.
Blader
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(07-04-2017, 03:34 PM)
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The Beguiled (2017)
Some really great lighting, framing, and production designed, wrapped around an ensemble of good performances from Kidman, Dunst, Fanning, and Farrell (plus a few kids who I didn't know but they were solid too). It doesn't have any of the original's macabre and just flat out weird tone, but I do like the sense of ambiguity it introduces, particularly in regards to Farrell's character, who is a little nuanced than Eastwood's bastard-from-the-start version. I liked it fine, but I think brianjones summed it pretty well as a solid cover that isn't bad in its own right but doesn't deviate enough to be as interesting as the original either.
7/10

Kong: Skull Island
Ehh...not terrible, but still kind of bad. Paper-thin stock characters who basically all blend together (why is Tom Hiddleston a mercenary/expert tracker? why is Brie Larson a war photographer? these characteristics don't mean anything to the movie), in no small part because of the phoned-in performances almost all across the board. The exceptions are Samuel L. Jackson, who you'd think would be the first one to phone it in but actually does a nice job with his revenge-obsessed marine; and John C. Reilly, who is portrayed in the trailers as an annoying comic relief, but ends up being a pretty likable guy who acts as the heart of the movie. The way his story ends is unusually touching for this kind of thing. The Kong CGI looks pretty good, the Skullcrusher CGI much less so, there's a lot of bad greenscreens, but Larry Fong manages to make the whole thing look as nice as possible -- particularly the sunsets and the fires/embers. In the end, it's got basically all of the same pros and cons as the 2014 Godzilla, but as a lifelong Godzilla fan, there's a little more for me to like in a mediocre Godzilla movie than a mediocre-to-bad Kong movie.
5/10
Borgnine
MBA in pussy licensing and rights management
(07-04-2017, 04:17 PM)
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Alien: Convenient: 4/10. Who writes this shit? "It's a main sequence star not unlike our own," who fucking talks like this. Yes it's better than Prometheus, by exactly 1, and that's only because it mostly made sense but was just dumb. Stop fucking with eggs people, I cannot stress this enough. Oh and the "twist?" Shamalam dot fuck off, who didn't see this coming. Makes the last 40 minutes a complete waste of time instead of just mostly which is what the previous 90 were. Yes Fassbender is the high point, other than Katherine Waterston's nipples.
AngmarsKing701
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(07-04-2017, 07:26 PM)
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Originally Posted by Borgnine

Alien: Convenient: 4/10. Who writes this shit? "It's a main sequence star not unlike our own," who fucking talks like this. Yes it's better than Prometheus, by exactly 1, and that's only because it mostly made sense but was just dumb. Stop fucking with eggs people, I cannot stress this enough. Oh and the "twist?" Shamalam dot fuck off, who didn't see this coming. Makes the last 40 minutes a complete waste of time instead of just mostly which is what the previous 90 were. Yes Fassbender is the high point, other than Katherine Waterston's nipples.

I'm wondering whether the spelling error was on purpose.
big ander
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(07-04-2017, 08:14 PM)
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I had to watch Jaws today but could only find it in pan-and-scan. Guess we aren't even pretending the American Dream isn't a lie anymore

Originally Posted by Borgnine

Alien: Convenient: 4/10. Who writes this shit? "It's a main sequence star not unlike our own," who fucking talks like this. Yes it's better than Prometheus, by exactly 1, and that's only because it mostly made sense but was just dumb. Stop fucking with eggs people, I cannot stress this enough. Oh and the "twist?" Shamalam dot fuck off, who didn't see this coming. Makes the last 40 minutes a complete waste of time instead of just mostly which is what the previous 90 were. Yes Fassbender is the high point, other than Katherine Waterston's nipples.

We already have Inherent Vice though

Holding onto that as a "twist" was beyond idiotic. Scott's so old he didn't think most people would catch it I guess?
Icolin
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(07-04-2017, 08:44 PM)
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The Matrix Reloaded


Ruining the lore aside, it's pretty entertaining. Really dated, but I like that. I'll stick to watching The Matrix from now on though.
Pachimari
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(07-04-2017, 09:01 PM)
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The Breakfast Club (1985) - ★★★★★
I couldn't get myself started on this movie when I tried watching it last month, but I gave it another go today, and although it might be slow to introduce each student, it really does come together in its own way, showing their distinct personalities, how they act off each other, and how they tackle different subjects, and reacts to different issues. It is very grounded and really gets to the core as to how teenagers work, and we get through the whole emotional wheel that you start to actually like these rather bizarre and nutty people. I slowly came to like each one of them throughout, and dare I say this is the most interesting depiction of high schoolers I've yet seen on film. And most of it comes down to the well done acting by the young folks, the tight script by John Hughes and the editing team putting together these scenes. Very well done.
Fancy Clown
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(07-04-2017, 09:25 PM)
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Originally Posted by big ander

I had to watch Jaws today but could only find it in pan-and-scan. Guess we aren't even pretending the American Dream isn't a lie anymore

Don't do this to yourself, get the bluray man. It's usually under $10 and it looks amazing.
AngmarsKing701
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(07-04-2017, 10:51 PM)
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Rented Life for tonight. Pray for me.
Icolin
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(07-04-2017, 11:01 PM)
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Originally Posted by AngmarsKing701

Rented Life for tonight. Pray for me.

It's a fun movie. Better with popcorn.
g11
Member
(07-04-2017, 11:13 PM)
Hacksaw Ridge - Not quite what I was expecting although with Mel Gibson directing, I should have guessed it'd have a quasi-Chritisan motif, but it was pretty light on the religion and focused more on the pacifism. Great movie overall though. I had never heard of Desmond Doss or his story before. I'm not a huge Garfield fan but he was pretty great.

Wonder Woman - Grading on a curve, it was a good superhero movie, but a great DC superhero movie. Easily the best since Batman Begins or The Dark Knight (Dark Knight Rises should have stayed in the darkness). As someone who doesn't read comics, I had little knowledge of Wonder Woman lore outside of a few bits and pieces. I was kind of surprised the Amazonians weren't, you know, from the Amazon, but some magical Greek Island. Was also a little confused when some basic-bitch Nazis killed half of them. I kind of figured with the lore behind them that they were just going to wreck everybody. I guess that would have made Dianna less impressive. All around a decent action movie but a bit predictable. V.M. Vargas being the main bad guy was pretty easy to predict although making David Thewlis be Ares was more than a little hard to swallow.

Lost Highway - One of the few Lynch movies I still hadn't seen, while there's a week off from Twin Peaks I figured I'd plug that particular gap in my Lynch knowledge. Definitely see a lot of similarities to Mulholland Drive, if not in plot than at least in theme. Still , I think I like Mulholland Drive better as an overall movie. Plenty of good performances but Robert Loggia steals every scene he's in. One thing I love about Lynch movies is the set dressing. It's unmistakably unique. The prison stood out to me the most here. It has all the trappings of a prison, but it also has ornate crown molding ceilings. It looks like cells in an old warehouse rather than a "real" jail. But I wouldn't want it any other way.
AngmarsKing701
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(07-04-2017, 11:49 PM)
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Originally Posted by Icolin

It's a fun movie. Better with popcorn.

Might be going with Malibu rum in Trader Joe's cherry cider. Or blackberry crush.

And popcorn
Borgnine
MBA in pussy licensing and rights management
(07-05-2017, 02:01 AM)
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Originally Posted by AngmarsKing701

Rented Life for tonight. Pray for me.

Better than Covenant.
KraftyKrankins
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(07-05-2017, 03:09 AM)
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Just saw The Room because my 4th of July plans fell through and I guess I'm a masochist now.
I can say only one thing that hasn't been said about the movie. It's better than Song to Song.

AngmarsKing701
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(07-05-2017, 03:10 AM)
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Life (2017) - Alien for the 21st century. It takes a little while to get into it. Maybe I missed something, but while they were waiting for this specimen to show up, there seemed to be a good deal of foreknowledge that there was something in the specimen that could be considered life from Mars. Maybe I missed where they said that particular bit. Anyway, I liked the way this was structured in that we got to know a little bit about the crew, there were firewall security plans in place, but clearly what they unearthed (or un-mars-ed in this case) was beyond their ability to control in the environment they had to try and do so.

So the shit hits the fan. And yes, we have the stupid people doing stupid things bit. Pretty sure this should be obvious by now, but why are there actual gloves where stupid scientists can poke the potentially lethal alien? How about the scientist controls robot hands from a completely separate room, instead of potentially contaminating the entire planet? But be that as it may, people do stupid things. They want to try and save the doctor who was stupid enough to pet the alien. So they rush in there to save the doctor and wind up as a Scooby snack.

But in the end, there was enough tension and thrills and gross stuff to keep me entertained. I liked it.

3.5 / 5
Icolin
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(07-05-2017, 03:24 AM)
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Originally Posted by KraftyKrankins

Just saw The Room because my 4th of July plans fell through and I guess I'm a masochist now.
I can say only one thing that hasn't been said about the movie. It's better than Song to Song.

I thought Song to Song was dope, but to each his own.
Sean C
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(07-05-2017, 04:48 AM)
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A Little Romance (1979): This is basically George Roy Hill's prefigurement of Moonrise Kingdom, and since that''s one of my all-time favourites, I very much enjoyed this. We follow two extremely literate 13-year-olds who meet in Paris and have conversations about their dislike of Heidegger and the various movies that the boy is a fan of (most of which star Robert Redford and were directed by, er, George Roy Hill; if he'd watched Taxi Driver he would have known not to try to impress his girlfriend by taking her to a pornographic film). The girl in this boy-meets-girl story is played by a 14-year-old Diane Lane, in her film debut, and she's terrific right off the bat (her costar, meanwhile, made only one more film, and is apparently now a dentist). Laurence Olivier is also here, for a role that is intermittently charming but often laboured (one can't much escape the sense that his character exists in large part to allow for the plot to advance, since the kids need an adult to cross the Italian border when they decide to go to Venice). The movie was filmed on location in France and Italy, and the scenery is lovely.
swoon
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(07-05-2017, 04:52 AM)
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Originally Posted by EAPidgeon

The Bad Batch (2017): This was probably one of the biggest flops this year for myself. A premise of a Mad Max cannibal wasteland with Jason Momoa and Keanu Reeves should have delivered far better than this. The biggest problem is the film is not an action film, but very much arthouse. Overall it feels like the film was produced in 3 specific set pieces, but that each of these held only tangental relation to each other. Bad Batch in an attempt to tie these together ends up feeling skimpy on the plot and dull from a narrative pace. The biggest problem is in attempting to make the writing feel substantial the film runs perhaps 40 minutes longer than it should.

Overall the standout parts of this film are the set design, world building / lore, and the cinematography.

1.5/5


i think it mostly works if you aren't expecting an action movie - it's like the middle part of fistful of dollars, though with love instead of bullets. it's big issue is that the tone is all over the place, especially in the first 30 mins or so
Rhomega Beta
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(07-05-2017, 04:58 AM)
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Pretty in Pink: Another great John Hughes high school movie, dealing with inter-social class romance, but it's also more than that, taking a bit of time to look into the future, and a dad who isn't yet done grieving over the loss of his wife. Duckie is the most interesting character, and I'm glad how his arc ended. Also, how about that' 80s fashion and hair?

I'm putting the John Hughes movies at:

1. Ferris Bueller's Day Of
2. Planes, Trains, and Automobiles
3. Home Alone
4. The Breakfast Club
5. Pretty in Pink
6. Sixteen Candles
Messofanego
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(07-05-2017, 05:04 AM)
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Originally Posted by Mi goreng

Started Apichatpong Weerasethakul's Cemetery of Splendour and wasn't ready to see an explicit scene of a man shitting in the jungle. 1/10

Best film of 2016.
daffy
Banned
(07-05-2017, 05:15 AM)
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crazy how the first car chase in Baby Driver is the best one. Also Jon Hamm reminded me of the T-1000 in his relentlessness!
Ridley327
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(07-05-2017, 02:02 PM)
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Headshot: What if one of those "man who can't remember his past but still knows how to kick some ass" types of action films was filtered through the same lens as The Raid films? It would probably wind up just like this film, and the similarities are more than superficial, thanks to this being a new vehicle for star/choreographer Iko Uwais and reunites him with Very Tri Yulisman and Julie Estelle, Baseball Bat Man and Hammer Girl themselves, in familiar roles as henchmen short on words and long on combat aptitude with weapons. Fans of hard-hitting martial arts violence will not be disappointed here, as Uwais' choreography is as sharp it has been in his star-making franchise, more than making up for his recent "why even bother" non-appearance in Star Wars: The Force Awakens and then some. While no less superhuman, it's always nice to see someone with the understanding of how progressively damaging fights are supposed to be, which makes the comebacks feel less like second winds than adrenaline driving broken and battered bodies past their limits in a last-ditch effort to not die. Every move feels meaty and every death rather chunky (for those with problems with realistic on-screen violence, there is definitely no way this would have gotten an R-rating, to give you an idea of how nasty it can get), and while directors Kimo Stamboel and Timo Tjahjanto combined aren't even half as thrillingly dynamic in their filmmaking as Gareth Evans when it comes to capturing the action, they do nevertheless make sure that you can see it throughout and do display some ambition with the amount of extended one-shot pans that crop up throughout the film.

As I mentioned, this one does have a more conventional kind of setup, which allows for Uwais to have far more of a focal point than he ever had in The Raid films. Does he pass the test when he's not unleashing hell? Well, kind of: the film doesn't require him to have to emote much, though when he does, it's on much shakier ground as he always comes across as a little too stern and prickly to make those feelings feel genuine. It's also hard not to see that in the film's big central relationship, between him and his caretaker/love interest, it's actress Chelsea Islan doing most of the heavy lifting in those scenes. Islan is a rather likable and pleasant presence that is almost always the best thing about any scene she's in, particularly a late one where she manages to rack up a pretty impressive body count for herself, but true to genre, she's somewhat sidelined early on when the film decides that she's the designated damsel, limiting her interactions to little more than being roughed up by villains with no interest in conversing with her. It sounds like an odd thing to complain about in an action film, but in this case, a lot of that has to do with the fact that once the backstory of our hero is fully revealed, it winds up close to sabotaging the carnage that ensues as the film goes to great lengths to increase the sap factor as each violent conclusion to the fights with people he had a personal connection to in his previous life get more and more sentimental, which clashes just as violently with the rest of the film as any of the actual clashes. Despite their best efforts to give this film a bit more of a mainstream appeal with these moments that are supposed to add more drama and tragedy to the proceedings, there's just not enough to work with in the story to make them land as the filmmakers want them to, especially for a film where the violence level is as sky high as it is. It doesn't make them a unwelcome presence, so much as it makes them a missed opportunity as they're simply not as well done as the action, and as talented as most of the cast are as fighters, their dramatic chops simply aren't strong enough to make up for the writing problems. That's why sidelining and shutting up Islan hurts as much as it does, since she's the best thing the movie has in that department, and more of her doing more than what she gets would have been very beneficial.

As a whole, though, this is a solid action film filled with the kind of fighting that you have been asking for while Gareth Evans is between projects, and the more conventional plotting and emotional stakes might win this a few more mainstream fans, provided they can stomach the violence. I just wish it was able to calculate the resources it has available a bit better, as I don't think it would have taken this much to turn it into a new recent highlight for the genre. Good, but it's not hard to see where it could have even better than that.
Last edited by Ridley327; 07-05-2017 at 09:38 PM.
Krev
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(07-05-2017, 02:12 PM)
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Spider-Man: Homecoming
The oppressiveness of the Marvel formula continues. In its determination that you'll have a fun time, this movie doesn't allow for any depth of characterisation or any emotional range. Even in its limited role here, RDJ hogs the film - Stark's relationship with Peter is the emotional centre of the movie, but their conflict is too thinly fleshed out to carry any weight. Keaton has a great presence as the villain but ultimately his character feels wasted. It moves too quickly for individual moments to , with constant jokes, and it goes down fairly smoothly. Ultimately it's a compendium of cliches from previous Spider-Man and teen movies, with nothing new or genuine.

Baby Driver
I loved this. The musical inspired opening third casts such a spell, but Wright handles the transition to darker thriller territory without a dip in the energy. I thought the early chase scenes could have been shot and edited better, but were still quite well done, but the action scenes in the last half of the film are superb, particularly the foot chase. Amazing editing, beautiful use of colour. I was won over by the sweetness of the romance, the chemistry of the leads and the way Wright shoots it (that steadicam work in the restaurant is a highlight of the film for me), though I agree with some of the complains about how Debora is written in the latter parts of the film. It's such an intoxicating movie fantasy world to be lost in, and I had a smile on my face for the majority of the film.

Wonder Woman
After a pretty flat opening, I was surprised by how won over I was once Diana and Steve set out on their adventure. The characters are funny, the action is well shot and easy to follow (though I could do with less Snyder style ramping), the cast all do great work, and the romance was sweet. The climax lets the whole film down. Diana's belief in the goodness of people was pretty well defined and left room for a really great villain to challenge her notions, but what we get is a rehash of Magneto and a million other comic book villains who want to turn the hero against humanity. It suffers from the problem of a lot of comic book movie fights, in that the combatants are gods who can be sent flying and keep getting up again. Their weaknesses and strengths are nebulously defined, so we don't know how much of a beating they can take. Rather than grasping the stakes of the battle, we're just watching characters hit each other until one of them dies.
Could easily have been better but still the best superhero film I've seen in years.


Halftime Best of the Year
1. Silence
2. Call Me By Your Name
3. Baby Driver
4. The Other Side of Hope
5. 20th Century Women
6. Manchester by the Sea
7. Good Time
8. Graduation
9. John Wick: Chapter 2
10. Newton
Honourable Mentions: By the Time It Gets Dark, Colossal, Blade of the Immortal, Felicité, The Party

Originally Posted by Mi goreng

Started Apichatpong Weerasethakul's Cemetery of Splendour and wasn't ready to see an explicit scene of a man shitting in the jungle. 1/10

It's not that explicit. It's all in shadow and ends quickly enough. I wasn't bothered.

Originally Posted by Messofanego

Best film of 2016.

I agree (but 2015 for me). It's also the first of his films that I've loved.
Pachimari
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(07-05-2017, 02:33 PM)
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Is it me or is there no July thread for "15 Films to Watch in..." ?
Blader
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(07-05-2017, 02:53 PM)
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More things from the weekend.

David Lynch: The Art Life
With Twin Peaks off for the week, I thought this would be a good alternate to scratch that David Lynch itch. It was ok. Lynch has a great memory and a captivating voice, so hearing him narrate stories from his childhood up to the beginnings of his filmmaking career, played over old photographs, drawings/paintings, and some early (but sparse) behind-the-scenes footage of Eraserhead is all pretty interesting. Especially when you pluck out certain memories or images that have clearly stayed with him and influenced his work in some way (one particular anecdote feels like a harbinger of the Mother in Twin Peaks). But I wish there was a lot more to it. Even with the directors' focus on Lynch as an artist and painter, rather than director (it's clear that painting was Lynch's first creative love and not just a recent pursuit; the doc barely touches on Eraserhead and a couple early shorts, and nothing at all past that), this still feels like it's just scratching the surface. It's also very slooooow. If nothing else, though, it's worth watching for Lynch's Bob Dylan anecdote.
6/10

Lone Wolf and Cub: Sword of Vengeance
Diving into this series for the first time. This one's pretty fun! Much talkier and plot-heavy than I was expecting. Love those blood geysers.
7/10
AngmarsKing701
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(07-05-2017, 02:56 PM)
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Hmm... through half the year, I've only seen eight 2017 movies.

1. Logan
2. Baby Driver
3. Kong: Skull Island
4. Guardians of the Galaxy Vol 2
5. John Wick 2
6. Wonder Woman
7. Life
8. Beauty and the Beast

All are 3 1/2 stars or higher for me, so while I haven't seen a lot of 2017 movies, I've liked the ones I've seen.
omgkitty
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(07-05-2017, 03:26 PM)
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I've seen 5 films from this year, and John Wick 2 is my favorite so far. I think that says a lot about the kinds of movies I've seen :\
AngmarsKing701
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(07-05-2017, 03:36 PM)
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Originally Posted by omgkitty

I've seen 5 films from this year, and John Wick 2 is my favorite so far. I think that says a lot about the kinds of movies I've seen :\

It was tough for me rank between Kong, GotG2 and JW2. I gave them all a 4/5 on letterboxd.

What it came down to for me was that Kong really just blew me away. I guess I went into it with very little info. I think I had seen one trailer, the same one over and over, so with little to no info and relatively low expectations, the spectacle of it really just blew me away. Also, I've always been more of an origins story guy vs. the sequels, so Kong kinda stood out from those three for me.

Which left GotG2 and JW2, and honestly I thought while JW2 was a lot of fun, I got a little sick of the same moves being used, and the story felt even flimsier than the first one. I dunno. The chemistry between the crew in GotG2 elevated it for me. Doesn't mean I don't like JW2, just that it fell lower in the rankings.

I'm sure once Mummy, Alien: Covenant, Dead Men Tell No Tales, King Arthur and some of the other summer bombas hit redbox, JW2 is gonna look like it's way up there vs. 5 out of 8.
Messofanego
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(07-05-2017, 03:44 PM)
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Whereas me, I appropriate someone's life and turn it into a film.

By The Time It Gets Dark [trailer]
My only exposure to Thai films is Apichatpong Weerasethakul, so getting to see a film from another Thai filmmaker was exciting especially since it's by a woman, Anocha Suwichakornpong. There are definitely some similarities like the magical realism such as a scene where the main girl is having tea with what looks like her future selves. There's the quiet poetic tone to the following of multiple characters' lives. There is possible reincarnation where two different women doing the same routine and dialogue with inviting a former activist to a vacation house for interviews or when the working class girl goes from being a cleaner to a buddhist monk and then to being in a nightclub. There is a meta-narrative at play such as it feeling like a film within a film where a director and DP are giving directions to prisoners to lie down in a propaganda shoot, and a writer/director interviewing Taew (the former protester/activist figure) to make her film, much like Adaptation. Then there's the final shot certainly calling to question the veracity of events transpiring. There's certainly arresting scenes cinematography and editing-wise, like when the main girl starts hallucinating a girl in a bear outfit in the forest and chases her where the shot-reverse shot slowly transforms into her chasing herself. The vignette style of storytelling of following various characters without much connection to each other seems more about contrasting the rural vs urban and working class vs upper class lifestyles. This lack of connections does develop an unsatisfactory feeling, but if you're fine with not much of a plot, it's still an intriguing anthropological film about life in Thailand that might pay dividends with rewatches.
overcast
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(07-05-2017, 06:34 PM)
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My top of 2017:

1) Baby Driver
2) It Comes At Night
3) Logan
4) Lost City of Z
5) John Wick 2
6) Get Out
7) Your Name
8) Split
9) Wonder Woman
10) Colossal.. I guess

After Get Out there is a decent drop, but I'm surprised there have been so many particularly good movies for me this year. I liked Your Name well enough too.

Originally Posted by Pachimari

Is it me or is there no July thread for "15 Films to Watch in..." ?

I've thought about just picking up Expendables job to post it on the forum occasionally. I think he'll do it soon though.
Icolin
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(07-05-2017, 06:40 PM)
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Originally Posted by overcast

My top of 2017:

1) Baby Driver
2) It Comes At Night
3) Logan
4) Lost City of Z
5) John Wick 2
6) Get Out
7) Your Name
8) Split
9) Wonder Woman
10) Colossal.. I guess

After Get Out there is a decent drop, but I'm surprised there have been so many particularly good movies for me this year. I liked Your Name well enough too.


I've thought about just picking up Expendables job to post it on the forum occasionally. I think he'll do it soon though.

You're missing Silence, like most people here. I guess that's because it came out in January (and bombed), which is unfortunate, because it's actually a phenomenal film.
Blader
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(07-05-2017, 06:40 PM)
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Logan, Get Out, and Baby Driver are my top three of the year. I've seen about 15 new movies this year and have liked almost all of them, but those are the only three I feel are most likely to still be on my list in six months.

Originally Posted by Icolin

You're missing Silence, like most people here. I guess that's because it came out in January (and bombed), which is unfortunate, because it's actually a phenomenal film.

It is excellent, but it is also a 2016 film. :P
overcast
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(07-05-2017, 06:51 PM)
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Originally Posted by Icolin

You're missing Silence, like most people here. I guess that's because it came out in January (and bombed), which is unfortunate, because it's actually a phenomenal film.

That was in my top 10 last year, watched it in December
kevin1025
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(07-05-2017, 06:51 PM)
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Originally Posted by overcast

My top of 2017:

1) Baby Driver
2) It Comes At Night
3) Logan
4) Lost City of Z
5) John Wick 2
6) Get Out
7) Your Name
8) Split
9) Wonder Woman
10) Colossal.. I guess

After Get Out there is a decent drop, but I'm surprised there have been so many particularly good movies for me this year. I liked Your Name well enough too.


I've thought about just picking up Expendables job to post it on the forum occasionally. I think he'll do it soon though.

Your top 10 are basically mine, though I'd flop Get Out to 3 and the rest would move downward.

But with six movies I'm seeing in theatres this month, the list is going to be crazy soon.

Originally Posted by Icolin

You're missing Silence, like most people here. I guess that's because it came out in January (and bombed), which is unfortunate, because it's actually a phenomenal film.

I count Silence as a 2016 film since it came out here at Christmas, but the way I see 2017 lists, 2016 films released in your region (limited or wide) in 2017 is then a 2017 film for you!
Icolin
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(07-05-2017, 06:55 PM)
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Originally Posted by Blader

Logan, Get Out, and Baby Driver are my top three of the year. I've seen about 15 new movies this year and have liked almost all of them, but those are the only three I feel are most likely to still be on my list in six months.



It is excellent, but it is also a 2016 film. :P

Originally Posted by overcast

That was in my top 10 last year, watched it in December

Originally Posted by kevin1025

Your top 10 are basically mine, though I'd flop Get Out to 3 and the rest would move downward.

But with six movies I'm seeing in theatres this month, the list is going to be crazy soon.



I count Silence as a 2016 film since it came out here at Christmas, but the way I see 2017 lists, 2016 films released in your region (limited or wide) in 2017 is then a 2017 film for you!

Whoops. Came out in the theatres near me in Canada in January 2017, so I got mixed up.
kevin1025
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(07-05-2017, 06:59 PM)
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Originally Posted by Icolin

Whoops. Came out in the theatres near me in Canada in January 2017, so I got mixed up.

I'd say it counts as 2017 for you, then. With film festivals and random screenings, a lot of 2017 movies are 2016 on Letterboxd and release date websites, so it's all a mess anyway, haha.
Krev
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(07-05-2017, 09:26 PM)
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Originally Posted by Messofanego

My only exposure to Thai films is Apichatpong Weerasethakul, so getting to see a film from another Thai filmmaker was exciting especially since it's by a woman, Anocha Suwichakornpong.

If you're looking for a less Weeresethakul-esque filmmaker I really liked Pen-Ek Ratanarung's Headshot and The Last Life in the Universe.
Puck Beaverton
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(07-05-2017, 09:53 PM)
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My top 3 this year are Baby Driver, Split, and Get Out.
Rhomega Beta
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(07-06-2017, 12:10 AM)
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6 movies so far this year.

1. The LEGO Batman Movie
2. Get Out
3. Cars 3
4. The Founder
5. Power Rangers
6. Transformers: The Last Knight
Sean C
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(07-06-2017, 04:04 AM)
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Places in the Heart (1984): So...what is this movie supposed to be about, exactly? Notionally the main plot is widowed Sally Field fighting to retain ownership of the family farm with the help of a black hired man and a blind boarder who is pushed into her house by the bank, but the movie also has a subplot about Field's sister's husband cheating on her with another woman, and the first and last scenes seem to suggest there's a larger plot about racial tensions in Depression-era Texas that went missing in action in the intervening scenes.

The movie opens with Field's husband, the local sheriff, getting accidentally killed by a drunk black kid, who is promptly lynched. When Danny Glover subsequently shows up as a man looking for work, you'd assume the fact that Field's husband was killed by a black person would have some narrative significance to the Glover/Field relationship given the timeframe, but it doesn't. Field never comes across as prejudiced in any meaningful way, and after being initially, and probably correctly suspicious of Glover when he starts hanging around her house and doing chores without being asked, she takes a shine to him quite quickly. The KKK shows up eventually to drive Glover away, but that doesn't feel much connected to anything that came before. And then there's the very final scene, where a few characters receiving communion suddenly turns into a fantastical representation of all the characters in the story doing so, including Field's husband and the boy who killed him, pictured sitting side-by-side. What does that have to do with what came before?

Field won her second Oscar for this movie (occasioning the oft-misquoted "you like me" speech), and it's solid work, but not something that, on its face, I would have singled out myself. The film is notable as the film debut of John Malkovich and the big breakthrough role for Danny Glover -- though it was the former who nabbed a Best Supporting Actor nomination, which, if one of them was going to get it, I'd have said it should be Glover. Also featured are a younger Ed Harris and Terry O'Quinn; like Malkovich, their hair situations were already not looking so hot in the early 1980s.
Fancy Clown
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(07-06-2017, 04:07 AM)
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Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull: So I'm about to blow your minds; not only is the infamous "nuke-the-fridge" sequence not bad, but it's probably the best part of this whole movie (and I mean that in a complimentary way). Hear me out. Okay, hiding in a fridge is silly and unrealistic--whatever-- and the fucking cgi gopher is utterly perplexing (seriously, why are there so many of these uncanny digital animals all over this movie?) but good lord, Indiana fuckin' Jones silhouetted against a mushroom cloud of nuclear origins is one hell of an image. This whole series the dude has been fighting to prevent supernatural WMD's from falling in the hands of bad guys, and here he is standing in the full awe of a weapon more powerful than all of them combined -- and not only is it man made, it's American made. "I like Ike" indeed, Indy. It's potent stuff, especially when the film kicks off with a bunch of guys dressed up as American soldiers opening fire on their supposed countrymen.

But even outside of the heady thematic stuff, the film's opening sequences set in America are all absolutely cracking stuff. From the eerie, panicked reveal of the phony nuclear test village, and the absurdly confident manner in which Spielberg reveals Indy (that shadow of him putting the fedora on is Indiana Jones distilled), to the build of the, quite frankly, fantastic action sequence in the warehouse. Even the Mutt stuff here is pretty fun, okay?

The America stuff works because at this point in the series, it's the most alien thing there is to Indiana Jones. We've seen him in deserts and we've seen him in jungles (and we see him again in jungles here and it feels exactly like the tired, disappointing rehash it is). But we've never seen Indy adventuring in Uncle Sam's backyard, fighting against enemies who look like friends, and we've certainly never seen him tackle saucer men. Yeah, I like the alien angle too. It just fits, ya know? It's totally unexpected, but that's why it works. And given the origins of the series in paying homage to the pulp of the era in which its set, the UFO stuff makes perfect sense.

But sadly Spielberg and Lucas don't go full Bodysnatchers and keep it set in an increasingly paranoid America full of G-Men, greasers, and ray guns. Instead we get the previously mentioned tired jungle rehash. And yeah, it's not great. But neither is it so heinously bad that it aught to be wiped from existence as some might have you believe. Spielberg still knows how to use the camera like no other, and weaves fun (if weightless and unearned) dysfunctional family chemistry between the leads and the ever growing set-pieces fairly seamlessly. But I'm not gonna go so far as to defend Shia swinging on vines, getting repeatedly smacked in the genitals by cgi plants in a cgi jungle as cgi monkeys leap about while he sword fights a so devoid of life Cate Blanchett you could easily mistake her performance for cgi as well. But there's fun stuff peppered in there, I swear, and it's executed with more flare than the glut of Marvel movies everyone loses their minds over.

Also, as an aside, I don't know why I thought Ford was too old for this movie, because first of all he looks like a young-ass man compared to how he's looking nearly a decade on, and second of all he brings it (and he kinda always looked like a confused old man even when he was young at times).

Kingdom of the Crystal Skull still represents a tremendous missed opportunity, but whereas the first time I saw it I was so busy hating it for failing to recapture the magic of the earlier entires, I never stopped to think it shouldn't have even attempted to be that shiny relic from the past. Maybe it should have been Indiana Jones growing old in America and watching as all his friends either die or betray him until he's faced with the ultimate cosmic indifference of the universe in the form of little gray men...that he can sucker punch. And maybe then he'll have earned his family.

Dial M for Murder: The first half of this chamber thriller is a devilish concoction of malicious suspense and gut-squirming subversion of expectations as we find ourselves squarely identifying with a most heinous individual. The second half keeps the suspense dialed pretty high, but eventually succumbs by dragging out the conclusion past the point where the cards have all been revealed, and indulging in Hitch's hokey comedy. Some of it works, and its still really good, but it holds this one back from being one of his best.
Last edited by Fancy Clown; 07-06-2017 at 04:18 AM.
Sean C
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(07-06-2017, 04:09 AM)
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Originally Posted by Fancy Clown

Yeah, I like the alien angle too. It just fits, ya know? It's totally unexpected, but that's why it works. And given the origins of the series in paying homage to the pulp of the era in which its set, the UFO stuff makes perfect sense.

The absolute conviction of so many people that aliens don't belong in an Indiana Jones movie never made any sense whatsoever to me.
Baroquemantic
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(07-06-2017, 08:46 AM)
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Passengers

I thought that was pretty aight, actually. Though it starts getting really dumb towards the end. Thankfully, that wasn't a complete dumpster fire, but admittedly, I'm a sucker for anything sci-fi. I'm always compelled to watch this stuff.

7/10

Also, the soundtrack is pretty great.
Messofanego
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(07-06-2017, 09:04 AM)
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Originally Posted by Krev

If you're looking for a less Weeresethakul-esque filmmaker I really liked Pen-Ek Ratanarung's Headshot and The Last Life in the Universe.

I'll keep them in mind, thanks.
Pachimari
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(07-06-2017, 09:11 AM)
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Originally Posted by Messofanego

Whereas me, I appropriate someone's life and turn it into a film.

By The Time It Gets Dark [trailer]

I really want to watch this movie, but where do one even go to buy it?
Boogs31
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(07-06-2017, 10:10 AM)
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I've seen 23 movies that have come out in 2017 thus far:

Great
1) Get Out
2) Raw
3) Baby Driver
4) I, Daniel Blake

Really Good
5) Silence
6) Jawbone
7) John Wick 2
8) Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2

Good
9) Logan
10) I Don't Feel at Home in This World Anymore
11) Your Name
12) Wonder Woman
13) A Monster Calls
14) The Founder
15) Meagan Leavey
16) Born in China
17) Split

Average
18) It Comes at Night
19) Lego Batman Movie
20) Beauty and the Beast

Below Average
21) Alien: Covenant
22) Kong: Skull Island
23) Life
Last edited by Boogs31; 07-06-2017 at 10:21 AM.
Gnome Scat
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(07-06-2017, 04:21 PM)
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Baby Driver: 4/5

Thought it was a very fun movie with great action sequences and performances from all cast members. I absolutely loved the first half of the movie because it blended action and humor very well together while also providing a basis for character development. However, I feel that the later half was disappointing. All the charm of the movie was sacrificed for to deliver a pretty generic ending that felt rushed in some places, the drop in quality was pretty jarring; one minute I was completely hooked, the next I wanted the movie to wrap it up. All in all, it was a fun ride and worth a watch, however it doesn't quite reach the quality of some of Edgar Wright's past movies.

Under the Skin: 5/5

Fantastic movie, was completely fascinated by it through and through. Although it moved at a bit of a slow pace, the execution of each scene was deliberate and impactful, all leading to a very subtle but powerful arc for Johansson's character (who I'm not sure was named). Often surreal and unnerving, Glazer took a unique and compelling approach to the subject the movie deals with, which would spoil the experience if mentioned. It's best to go into this one blind and open-minded because the less you one knows about it, the better it becomes. It's a real thinker and a great existential thriller, however it's more "art house" approach might turn some viewers off from it. Still, worth a watch.
Last edited by Gnome Scat; 07-06-2017 at 10:19 PM. Reason: Star ratings got messed up on mobile
Divius
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(07-06-2017, 10:07 PM)
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I was thinking of doing a 2017 in movies so far thread, but I feel like it would be ~5 titles being repeated and nothing really interesting would come from it so I decided against it.

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