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St3v3
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(10-18-2017, 06:42 PM)
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I've been suffering with depression (as well as social anxiety and agoraphobia) for awhile and like so many others I comfort eat and as a result I've gained about 40lbs. I used to be really huge but managed to lose 100lbs and the thought of going back to that size terrifies me. Recently I've just not given a single fuck, I eat what I want, however much I want so it's no surprise I've gained, but I think I've finally had enough. None of the clothes I bought when I lost the weight fit anymore and it's a real eye opener, I knew I'd put on weight but I didn't dare jump on the scale until today.

I've always been fat, from kid to adult but there was a brief spell of about 1.5 years where I felt great and I so want that again. I started at 308lbs and got down to 204lbs, and I've now bounced back up to 243lbs. I felt really good at 210lbs at 6ft 3 so that's my goal. I've got no junk in the house and I've planned all my meals and shopping for the week on MyFitnessPal. I really want to try getting outside for walks, to both help with the weight loss and my social anxiety/agoraphobia but I'm not sure if I'm ready yet, I've been on medication for depression for over a month now and it's helping for sure with my mood but it hasn't helped my other issues (I'm on the waiting list to see a therapist but it's a long wait on the NHS).

It really feels like a constant, daily struggle to just not overeat, it really is an addiction. If I have something "bad" in the house I will sit upstairs thinking about it, thinking about eating it until I finally cave and go get it, then I feel terrible afterwards.
Arment
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(10-18-2017, 06:44 PM)
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I recommend the Ketogenic diet. Great for physical energy and mental clarity. If you need any help starting feel free to PM me!

I too have always been fat. I was 330 at my heaviest. I'm currently 233 as of this morning. I've been full on dieting for 16 weeks. Started at 277.

The keto subreddit is a great starting point to learning about it.
Pepboy
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(10-18-2017, 06:49 PM)
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I'm not too experienced with depression, but I can understand some of the struggle.

When I feel unattractive, I try to focus that negative feeling to a productive outlet. But I imagine that is even tougher with depression. Is there an alternative form of escapism that you find works for you? Maybe play a game or read a book? Every hour is a victory.

Edit: I also tried chewing gum for an hour. If I still want to move my jaw after an hour of chewing, I must really be hungry. Sometimes helps.
HotHamBoy
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(10-18-2017, 06:52 PM)
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OP, I'm fat again, too.

I've also always been fat. In my 20s I started trying to do something about it, got all the way down to 185 but would regain over a few years up to 235. Lose it again, gain it again.

Now I'm 32 and over the last few years I've gotten myself up to about 260. I really need to get it unser control again bit I fear this cycle will continue until I can no longer motivate myself to get rid of it.

It really feels like a constant, daily struggle to just not overeat, it really is an addiction. If I have something "bad" in the house I will sit upstairs thinking about it, thinking about eating it until I finally cave and go get it, then I feel terrible afterwards.

I do this too. I've boxed leftover food at resteraunts and eaten it before I got home.

The best things I can think to do is to:

Try to not keep such foods in the house

Fill up on raw vegetables anytime you think about food.

Go for a walk or jog

Engross yourself in a project

Just leave the house. Go do something, anything.

Go stare at yourself in a mirror while standing on a scale
NOLA_Gaffer
Member
(10-18-2017, 06:55 PM)
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I was healthiest in my college days roughly a little over a decade ago when I was walking end-to-end across the campus multiple times a day.

It's just been a downhill slide since then.
Steeped in a Sea of Games
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(10-18-2017, 06:55 PM)
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I've lost about 70 pounds and I realize to keep it off I'm going to probably need to count calories the rest of my life. I've never had a good ability to read my appetite so it seems like something I'll just have to do. Get an app like myfitnesspal and any time you start putting on weight, start using it religiously to get back to baseline. I'd also use it when at your target weight for a few months so you get a good idea of just how much you can eat and proper portions.

Good luck! You can turn it around. Your health isn't worth an extra slice of pizza. My fucked up back is a testament to that.
curiouscharles
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(10-18-2017, 06:58 PM)
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The combination of agoraphobia and depression is going to be hard to beat.

Have you considered seeing a counsellor / therapist OP?

It's funny, because I've been skinny my whole life, but related with a lot of your post - I've just been fortunate in that I was born into an active family that valued physical health so even in my dark times I can never drift that far away from my baseline.

We need to focus on getting you happy mostly, and fit second mostly - if we can work on them both at the same time maybe we can get you to a new baseline so when you have dark periods [we all backslide and have dark periods] you won't lose so much progress.
ErichWK
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(10-18-2017, 06:59 PM)
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I liked doing Keto when I lost my first 40 pounds because it forces you to not cheat if you want to stay in Ketosis. I have no willpower so knowing that I would lose my Ketosis if I had a delicious Gelato kept me from eating that shit. But in the end, you are gonna need a 100% lifestyle change to keep your weight down. I feel ya, my metabolism is fucking horse shit and I gained 20 pounds the past 2 years after trying s hard to be fit and it really fucked with me. Now I set another hardline rule of going to the gym monday through friday and that I CANNOT break a day no matter what. You gotta be black and white about getting back into shape..it sucks..but no cutting corners
St3v3
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(10-18-2017, 06:59 PM)
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Originally Posted by Steeped in a Sea of Games

Good luck! You can turn it around. Your health isn't worth an extra slice of pizza. My fucked up back is a testament to that.

God don't start with back pain, I've suffered with it for years. I've had a couple of surgeries which didn't help sadly, and even at my lowest weight it was still a major problem, although not quite as bad as it is now. I'm just popping pain killers constantly at this point, while swapping from heat packs to ice packs. I've tried yoga, physiotherapy and every gadget and gizmo under the sun and at best they ease the pain while using them (TENS, massage pillows). The daily pain is definitely a contributor to my depression.

Originally Posted by curiouscharles

The combination of agoraphobia and depression is going to be hard to beat.

Have you considered seeing a counsellor / therapist OP?

I'm on the waiting list for a therapist, they said 2-6 months and it has been about 1.5 months.
LegendofDragoonLives
Member
(10-18-2017, 06:59 PM)
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- myfitness pal, download it and look at it every day for 2-3 weeks. Good overview of the major fuck ups
- get to jogging 2-3 times a week
- work out 2 times a week, push 1 day, pull the other
- no more drinking pepsi, cola, etc other than 1 drink a week
- I would say lay off the suggary fat foods, but MFP app will help you with that.

You follow that formula for 6 months, and you will notice a significant difference. Don't look at your weight other than 5-8 weeks at a time. Focus on the goal and don't make excuses for yourself. You will only feel great after you accomplish several small goals, regardless of the shit you will have to deal to get there.

Now lock in & get your ass to work.
TyrantII
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(10-18-2017, 06:59 PM)
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It's hard, but what not turn you comfort eating into comfort exercising.

Every time you want to reach for food, count to 4, grab your coat, and go for a mile walk. Get a routine together and stick with it.

Your goal should be turning from food to physical activity.. added benefit that physical activity is just as good for your mental health as it is for your physical health.
Tizoc
Member
(10-18-2017, 07:02 PM)
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Some stuff I could suggest-
Do at least 1 hour of walking or jogging per day, but do so while listening to some audio books, audio dramas, podcasts etc. to help you pass the time. eVEN if you are subbed to a gym, you can just use the machines there for jogging or power/speed walking.

There are many great stuff to listen to that sometimes you may just want to extend your walk or jog just to hear more of what you're listening to.
It sounds a little odd but it keeps you engrossed.
Bakercat
Member
(10-18-2017, 07:04 PM)
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Same for me OP. I was very heavy as a teen and I lost over a hundred pounds in 2009. In the last year my health has increasingly went down. I have gained over a hundred pounds in less than a year and nothing I do can stop it from going up or at the very least stagnate. I found out that I have very low testosterone, (216 for a 25 year old male) and they've pinpointed it to my pituitary gland in the brain. I'm waiting for an MRI, (4th one this year btw) to see if there is a tumor growing around it. I hate it when people say only the lazy are fat. Some of us gain a lot of weight just when a simple thing is wrong with our body.
curiouscharles
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(10-18-2017, 07:04 PM)
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Originally Posted by St3v3

God don't start with back pain, I've suffered with it for years. I've had a couple of surgeries which didn't help sadly, and even at my lowest weight it was still a major problem, although not quite as bad as it is now. I'm just popping pain killers constantly at this point, while swapping from heat packs to ice packs. I've tried yoga, physiotherapy and every gadget and gizmo under the sun and at best they ease the pain while using them (TENS, massage pillows). The daily pain is definitely a contributor to my depression.



I'm on the waiting list for a therapist, they said 2-6 months and it has been about 1.5 months.

waiting list? wth?

there's like a million therapists here in Victoria, BC, and they're all hugely available...

where you located, why is that normal?

the best way to start making small strides towards a healthier BMI is to increase your daily activity levels [ie - do anything you can do on foot on foot], but with the agoraphobia and depression that will be hard to motivate yourself to do.

can you explore some different therapists? there's no reason you can't find one who has spots available immediately in my limited understanding of that world.

we need to get you workign on this ASAP so you can start feeling the success of small accomplishments towards your goal.


Originally Posted by TyrantII

It's hard, but what not turn you comfort eating into comfort exercising.

Every time you want to reach for food, count to 4, grab your coat, and go for a mile walk. Get a routine together and stick with it.

Your goal should be turning from food to physical activity.. added benefit that physical activity is just as good for your mental health as it is for your physical health.

this is what i do as well, but i'm already fit as fuck.

i think the OP sounds like he's not really at a place where he can do this sort of thing himself without help first, but i could be wrong.

good advice either way, just not sure if the OP can effectualize it at the moment.
joeblackisback
Member
(10-18-2017, 07:06 PM)
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Good luck getting back to your goal weight! Any movement is good movement, really. Even if you download one of those 7 minute exercise apps. That will keep you at least minimally active until you're able to get outside comfortably on a regular basis. Lots of bodyweight stuff can be done right in your house as well.

I would also say definitely be religious about the myfitnesspal app. It's amazing what we eat without really thinking about it, and the app helps to keep you cognizant of it so you can manage it more appropriately.
Mr. X
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(10-18-2017, 07:08 PM)
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Weight training. Make time to go the gym 3 times a week, change in diet has be a lifestyle change not a temp one.

https://www.health.harvard.edu/mind-...off-depression
Damaniel
Banned
(10-18-2017, 07:08 PM)

Originally Posted by Arment

I recommend the Ketogenic diet. Great for physical energy and mental clarity. If you need any help starting feel free to PM me!

I too have always been fat. I was 330 at my heaviest. I'm currently 233 as of this morning. I've been full on dieting for 16 weeks. Started at 277.

The keto subreddit is a great starting point to learning about it.

I second this. I lost 100 pounds doing keto about 15 years ago. Sadly, I ran into the same situation as you - I was young and figured I was fine, but I abandoned healthy eating after a couple years and proceeded to gain most of it back over the following 10 years. I'm back to doing keto again with my wife - especially important this time since I'm nearly 40 now and have a family history of diabetes. Down 15 pounds so far and losing around 2 pounds a week. I know there are some very anti-keto people here, but don't listen to them - keto works, as long as you're willing to commit to it long-term and consider it a single step in a longer term plan of healthy diet and exercise.
sir_kevith
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(10-18-2017, 07:08 PM)
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I don't know much about dieting and never really put on weight until I got sick and couldn't exercise. I kept eating the same way and put on 10-15 pounds in just a few months which is insane because I'm a smaller guy. I never put weight on my whole life.

The problem was my metabolism adjusted to me riding my bike to work every day for years and needing some extra calories. When I got sick I continued to eat the same amount without exercising and i put on weight fast!

I never really changed my diet and since resuming my normal activity and it took over year to lose that 10-15 pounds and go back to my normal weight. It took way longer for me to lose than to put on.

If I were you, I wouldn't panic. Your weight is going to fluctuate depending on what's going on in your life. You accomplished something amazing by losing 100 pounds before! Be fair to yourself and just remember to either increase your regular activity or change your diet if you can't. For me, it's honestly easier to force myself to walk or ride a bike than to change my diet.
Sinfamy
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(10-18-2017, 07:08 PM)
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I lost 40 freedom pounds from 195 to 155 at 6'0" in less then a year and got a decent muscle mass.
I essentially just eat meat, cheese and vegetables 6 days out of the week with a good cheat day on Saturdays.
I don't care about ratios or macros. I just eat less than 2000 calories and more than 150g of protein, also lift heavy things and put them back down.
CreepingFear
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(10-18-2017, 07:10 PM)
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I know the struggle. Last year I went from 250 to 166. I went back to 220 after Trump won. I'm now back down to 177, but I don't have time for exercise with my studying for CCNA and I have hit a plateau.
TheLostBigBoss
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(10-18-2017, 07:11 PM)
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Like said above, people like "us", who have been fat most of our lives, are most likely going to bounce back a large portion, if not all the weight at some point. I lasted around two years before gaining back around 10/15 pounds, which is about one third of the weight I lost a few years ago.

It's just gonna be a struggle, gonna need to monitor your calories for a while until you get back into a pattern where you can easily identify the amount of food you're eating without writing it down.
Bakercat
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(10-18-2017, 07:12 PM)
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Originally Posted by curiouscharles

waiting list? wth?

there's like a million therapists here in Victoria, BC, and they're all hugely available...

where you located, why is that normal?

You'd be surprised how hard it is to see someone for mental health in most of the U.S. Many areas have maybe one or two psychologists or psychiatrists for thousands of people and you have to get on a waiting list for months. It's even worse when they don't take your insurance or any at all, which is most of the time. The only reason I was able to get therapy was because my college gives it for free to students. Even then it's only cognitive behavioral therapy, which isn't working for myself and need another type to help me. Sadly, I can't find a single therapist I need for over 100 miles from me. Mental health sucks so much for many Americans.
Roubjon
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(10-18-2017, 07:12 PM)
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I can empathize OP. I was chubby my whole life until my Junior / Sophmore year in College when I started running and eating healthier, but when I got into my first relationship it turned into a toxic one and my depression re-ignitied my unhealthy eating habits. They got way worse than they ever were and i gained 100 pounds and eventually got up to 260 until I finally broke up with my ex after 2 years.

Since then I've lost 60lbs over the past year and am back down to 200lbs, but it has been so difficult. Every day I have these urges to eat the worst food and mentally it feels awful. I've realized that the toll the relationship took on me is going to have life-long repercussions and it's frustrating. What has helped me is knowing that it's okay to have some sweet stuff every day, but to just make sure it's not ever overdoing it. I eat a handful of chocolate chips and almonds every day and drink Seltzer in order to satisfy those cravings and it works most days, as long as there is nothing else in the house.
It's when I'm alone and sad where I'll eat half a bag of nasty chips and then feel like garbage.

Some advice is to try to keep yourself active mentally and stay focused on something. Also be aware of your triggers. When I was in my relationship the only thing I ever did near the end was play Overwatch and I would get so upset with myself when I lost competitive mode I would eat an entire half-gallon of ice cream. I still play Overwatch, but I don't play competitive mode because whenever I lose I get a rush of that old terrible feeling and It's just not worth it anymore.

I wish you the best of luck with your journey to living a healthier lifestyle, I know how hard it is.
-MD-
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(10-18-2017, 07:13 PM)
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Low carb diet works.
____
Member
(10-18-2017, 07:14 PM)
I'm not fat, but I feel I will be one day. I'm in pretty good shape, but this:

It really feels like a constant, daily struggle to just not overeat, it really is an addiction. If I have something "bad" in the house I will sit upstairs thinking about it, thinking about eating it until I finally cave and go get it, then I feel terrible afterwards.

Is me daily (although it's uberEATS and not food in the house), and I don't know how I got here or how to get out of it.

Once I work out, I feel better and the effects of the bad eating habits go away quickly, but as soon as I'm out of "workout mode" I go back into "fuck, I wanna eat an entire restaurant"
BeforeU
Oft hope is born when all is forlorn.
(10-18-2017, 07:15 PM)
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Originally Posted by Sinfamy

I lost 40 freedom pounds from 195 to 155 at 6'0" in less then a year and got a decent muscle mass.
I essentially just eat meat, cheese and vegetables 6 days out of the week with a good cheat day on Saturdays.
I don't care about ratios or macros. I just eat less than 2000 calories and more than 150g of protein, also lift heavy things and put them back down.

For that height, isnt 155 pounds less? I mean you fall into skinny category? I am 6.1 and 157 pounds. I feel skinny lol i am trying to gain weight atm.
Mango Positive
(10-18-2017, 07:16 PM)
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Relax, guy! Coming soon:

Fat burning / muscle strengthening pill!
metalslimer
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(10-18-2017, 07:16 PM)
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I will put out there that if you have the money trying out something like Soylent is a great way to know what your consuming and lose weight. I lost 40lbs just by drinking/eating Soylent and walking every day.
Condom
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(10-18-2017, 07:18 PM)
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Read the power of habit and change the habits that make you overeat. You should study your mind and strategically go about beating it.

When I was depressed I kept reading psychology books as if they're crack cocaine and tried to apply the theory on my own situation. In the end it worked for me, I'm still developing but rarely depressed anymore because I can recognize and stop negative thought loops and habits.
TyrantGuardian
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(10-18-2017, 07:22 PM)
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I'm in a very similar situation to you OP, except I have kept from re-gaining all the weight I lost. The thing that did it for me was to:

1. Keep it really fucking simple. Don't bother with any crazy diets or counting calories (unless that motivates you) or exercise that makes your stress levels shoot up. I just eat smaller portions and never stuff myself when I already know I'm full but otherwise have kept my normal lifestyle, more or less.

2. I make sure to avoid purchasing anything with more than 10g of sugar on the nutrition chart. Eating sugar makes me feel super hungry for the rest of the day and makes it completely impossible to follow the first point.

3. Don't beat yourself up and think you have failed permanently because you feel like buying a chocolate bar or a Ben & Jerry's once a week. It's fine, just don't binge that shit and maybe try spreading it out over the week instead of eating it all at once. I usually make that stuff last at least 2 days now, huge improvement :P
Just be mindful of the sugar cravings, obviously.

If you can't handle doing these on your own, don't be afraid to seek assistance from a therapist. The way you described your issue is definitely more of a mental framework thing than anything else. Trying to force yourself to exercise or intensely follow calorie counting apps if you actually hate doing those things won't do a thing.
Username1198
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(10-18-2017, 07:23 PM)
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Originally Posted by Arment

I recommend the Ketogenic diet. Great for physical energy and mental clarity. If you need any help starting feel free to PM me!

I too have always been fat. I was 330 at my heaviest. I'm currently 233 as of this morning. I've been full on dieting for 16 weeks. Started at 277.

The keto subreddit is a great starting point to learning about it.

Can you please provide some links? Iím gonna try keto soon, but not sure where to start. Iíve checked out a few sites but they all wanna sell me stuff lol.
shnurgleton
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(10-18-2017, 07:29 PM)
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Originally Posted by Username1198

Can you please provide some links? Iím gonna try keto soon, but not sure where to start. Iíve checked out a few sites but they all wanna sell me stuff lol.

/r/keto on reddit is actually a great resource on it

Learn to love eating meat and cheese, but donít skimp on that fiber else youíll be having some challenges on the porcelain throne

Make sure to drink a lot of water too - lot of your initial losses will be water weight

Miller Lite has 3g carbs per 12oz and most hard liquor has 0, but skip alcohol altogether if you can. Wasted calories that fit into no macros
Kaiser Swayze
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(10-18-2017, 07:30 PM)
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I can relate. I wish there were some advise I could give, but there's nothing I can share that I'm sure you don't already know. It's not a lack of information. I'm sure you've got plenty of that. The irony is that overweight people probably know more about nutrition than skinny people do. It's motivation and discipline, and I can't tell you where to find that, and it's rarely ever in the same place twice. Just don't give up is all.
Killdozer
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(10-18-2017, 07:30 PM)
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Originally Posted by St3v3

God don't start with back pain, I've suffered with it for years. I've had a couple of surgeries which didn't help sadly, and even at my lowest weight it was still a major problem, although not quite as bad as it is now. I'm just popping pain killers constantly at this point, while swapping from heat packs to ice packs. I've tried yoga, physiotherapy and every gadget and gizmo under the sun and at best they ease the pain while using them (TENS, massage pillows). The daily pain is definitely a contributor to my depression.

Regarding back pain.

I had bulging discs in my L3, L4, L5, and S1 since high school but shit really went sideways in college due to being sedentary. Eventually it got bad enough that I had to do something drastic about it since the regular stuff (diet, exercise, stretching, PT) wasn't working. At that time the only FDA approved remedy was surgery (microdiscectomy)

It fucking sucked.

Fast forward 2 years and my back is falling apart again.

Good news is now something called IDD therapy is FDA approved as a non-surgical remedy for bulging discs and back pain. I did regular decompression stuff like tables and hanging upside down that never worked but this is a different animal.

Here's some info on it:
http://www.paincaremd.com/idd-therapy/
http://www.paincaremd.com/idd-questions/

Basically I went from 10/10 can't sleep even with massive pain killers to 80% better in a week (I just went 5 days in a row). From there I went for 15 more visits over the next month and got to about 95%-98% better which is completely manageable and the only maintenance is some core exercise and stretching every now and then. Overall the procedures are totally painless and actually kinda comfortable.

The only warnings I have about this is that a lot of places will want to charge up front and charge ridiculous amounts of money for it. Do your research and find a place that doesn't want money up front, you pay for it on a per usage basis, and then tries to bill as much as possible to your insurance as PT and medical stuff. Even at that place when my PT benefits were exhausted after 12-ish visits I just paid the 'cash' price and it was ~$70 a session. A small price to pay for getting your life back.

It has been 10 years since and it's still all good. The only lingering effects are the numb spots and tingling in parts of my left leg and foot from the original surgery.

The only problem is since then I went from 280lbs, to 195lbs, and now back to 240lbs, and all the routines (diet/exercise/etc) don't seem to work anymore.
low-G
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(10-18-2017, 07:36 PM)
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I also am fat again, although not anywhere near as fat as I was before I lost weight.

I spent about 3 years quite fit, but now I am probably a bit unhealthy with fat alone (but I'm still exercising so I'm not doing too terribly, slightly stronger than ever before).

What did it for me? Having a kid. Man o man (she screamed just as I typed this, I summoned the demon). Also mixed drinks (for a while). Right now is also pretty much the most stressful part of my life thus far.

When I am eating well & exercising I definitely feel my best, but the demands on me from all directions + stress makes it impossible (at least the exercise) at times.

Just trying to sympathize / whatever with OP / everyone else.
RedZaraki
Banned
(10-18-2017, 07:38 PM)
I'm not saying I know what works for other people.

But I've discovered something that's been working for me and I guess I'll share it.

FYI, I suffer from high blood pressure (hereditary) and this has lowered that dramatically for me.


4 things I've been living by. Again, this isn't for everyone:

1) No caffeine. ZERO. I drink caffeine-free diet soft drinks. I really like Kroger's Diet Orange soda and their Diet Lemon Lime.

2) Calorie count. Every day. My target is 1100 calories intake a day. For other people you could go up to 1400 or 1500, but I want to actually lose weight at a good pace.

3) The food you DO eat must have high protein per calorie. This is how you can live with it. This is how you can eat not a lot but still feel full. A lot of these are weight watchers entrees. They have a ham and cheese egg scramble that's 180 calories for 18 grams or so of protein. I buy these for $2 a piece, grab a variety of them. I also like the lasagna, the three cheese ziti with meatballs, and the enchiladas.

4) Buy a treadmill and use it. I do this at home. It beats the hell out of feeling judged at the gym or dealing with the terrible weather. Every 2 days I get on my treadmill and I walk/run 3 miles. That burns around 300 calories in around 50 minutes. While you're doing this you can set up your phone or laptop and watch Youtube videos or listen to music. I've been really enjoying ChessNetwork classic matches.


So that's my routine and has been for a while. Sometimes I treat myself. Like, I'll skip lunch and then have Taco Bell for supper. Like 3 items and in the area of 1400 calories.

I actually enjoy the food I eat, I don't feel like I'm starving, and I weigh myself daily and seeing the results.

Again, it's not for everyone. I skip breakfast AND lunch a lot of days. I only drink calorie free stuff during the day. In that way I'm actually fasting every single day until I get home from work. Then I have 3 or 4 small meals in a 3 hour period, and I'm done again by 8pm.

Some would say this is too difficult and stuff, but to me it's actually been easy for me to leverage my workplace as a way of not eating food. I have more time during my lunch breaks to do other things, like go out shopping, browse the web, or go on walks.

Hope this info is useful to you or anyone else. I'm a short 5'5" guy. I went from 165 lbs to 155 lbs in 3 weeks of this. Currently at 148. My target weight is 135.
Brashnir
Member
(10-18-2017, 07:44 PM)
A couple bits of advice:

1 - It's clear from your previous weight loss that you already have a solid plan that works for you with regard to losing weight. This is good, but from your relapse, it's also likely that you don't have a plan for staying in shape once you reach your goal. I can sympathize on both counts. I lost 150 lbs and relapsed over the course of a decade. Not having a plan for the end coupled with starting a new job (which caused me untold amounts of anxiety, stress and depression) a year after my weight loss contributed to my relapse. I'm ~30 lbs into losing the weight again, and this time I have put together a plan to alter my diet as I get closer to my goal, so that the end isn't a hard cut back to "do whatever the fuck you want," but a slow months-long transition into a viable long-term strategy.

2 - re: your back - I also have chronic back problems, and it took me about 10 years to realize that I could greatly limit/decrease my back pain during the day by altering the way I slept. My natural tendency when I sleep is to sort of splay my limbs out all over the place, and often my shoulders would be on my side vertically, while my legs, or one leg would be out straight with my hips turned onto my back, causing a twist in my spine. If I sleep on my side in a more rigid manner, with both my shoulders and hips stacked vertically, and my hips and knees bent in a 90-degree angle, my back feels approximately 100% better in the morning. I still catch myself in bad positions from time to time, but if I consciously correct my position every time I do, it still does a lot of good. The only downside is that I regularly wake up with a sore hip on the side I was sleeping on, but it's a small price to pay to limit my debilitating back pain. (note - since you've had surgery, it's likely that your degenerative issues are considerably further along than mine, so this may accomplish jack nothing. But hey - it's worth a shot)

3 - When it comes to taking advice from others (including and especially me) on weight loss and diets, everyone is always wrong, and everyone is always right. Weight loss and maintenance is a tremendously personal thing since there are so many physiological and psychological barriers that we all have built up over the course of our lives. The only real truth is that the best plan for you is whatever plan you can stick to. The math works on all of them, but you need to be able to actually do it, or it's never going to work.

4 - Spend 10 minutes every day doing something that your future self will be glad you did.
Liu Kang Baking A Pie
women be talkin'!
vagina lips flappin'!
(10-18-2017, 07:46 PM)
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Originally Posted by Username1198

Can you please provide some links? Iím gonna try keto soon, but not sure where to start. Iíve checked out a few sites but they all wanna sell me stuff lol.

You should follow your instinct on this one, dude.
curiouscharles
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(10-18-2017, 07:48 PM)
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Originally Posted by RedZaraki

I'm not saying I know what works for other people.

But I've discovered something that's been working for me and I guess I'll share it.

FYI, I suffer from high blood pressure (hereditary) and this has lowered that dramatically for me.


4 things I've been living by. Again, this isn't for everyone:

1) No caffeine. ZERO. I drink caffeine-free diet soft drinks. I really like Kroger's Diet Orange soda and their Diet Lemon Lime.

2) Calorie count. Every day. My target is 1100 calories intake a day. For other people you could go up to 1400 or 1500, but I want to actually lose weight at a good pace.

3) The food you DO eat must have high protein per calorie. This is how you can live with it. This is how you can eat not a lot but still feel full. A lot of these are weight watchers entrees. They have a ham and cheese egg scramble that's 180 calories for 18 grams or so of protein. I buy these for $2 a piece, grab a variety of them. I also like the lasagna, the three cheese ziti with meatballs, and the enchiladas.

4) Buy a treadmill and use it. I do this at home. It beats the hell out of feeling judged at the gym or dealing with the terrible weather. Every 2 days I get on my treadmill and I walk/run 3 miles. That burns around 300 calories in around 50 minutes. While you're doing this you can set up your phone or laptop and watch Youtube videos or listen to music. I've been really enjoying ChessNetwork classic matches.


So that's my routine and has been for a while. Sometimes I treat myself. Like, I'll skip lunch and then have Taco Bell for supper. Like 3 items and in the area of 1400 calories.

I actually enjoy the food idea, I don't feel like I'm starving, and I weigh myself daily and seeing the results.

Again, it's not for everyone. I skip breakfast AND lunch every day. I only drink calorie free stuff during the day. In that way I'm actually fasting every single day until I get home from work. Then I have 3 or 4 small meals in a 3 hour period, and I'm done again by 8pm.

Some would say this is too difficult and stuff, but to me it's actually been easy for me to leverage my workplace as a way of not eating food. I have more time during my lunch breaks to do other things, like go out shopping, browse the web, or go on walks.

Hope this info is useful to you or anyone else. I'm a short 5'5" guy. I went from 165 lbs to 155 lbs in 3 weeks of this. Currently at 148. My target weight is 135.

This is a really great post.

For reference guys, I'm 5'11.5" and only 148lbs, and my BMI is scary low [I'm ripped as fuck these days], and these are pieces of advice I even follow [actually, these are some of the things that helped me go from soft to fucking ripped].

Switched to decaf coffee, only decaf diet soda as treats [love my diet / caffeine-free coca cola sooooo much], started doing portion control, and stopped using the car if I could walk to accomplish the same task in under 40 minutes.

Only thing I'd add is no carbs after lunch, that's the Hugh Jackmann wolverine diet and it fucking works [and honestly, a piece of broiled salmon with greek yogurt and cucumber slices or tortilla-free taco bowls for dinner are my absolute junk food now anyway...].

Again, great post, especially love how you frame it so carefully so as not to assume what works for you works for everyone - but had to jump on and say actually this is just great general fucking advice!

edit: Also remember guys, if you eat right 5/6 days out of the week, you can ALWAYS have a treat day 1/2 days a week [maybe 1 one week, 2 the next, and keep it variable like that].

I eat so fucking clean these days [and it's amazing how you desire less junk the less you eat], and then I make deep fried breaded chicken burgers with bacon and cheese on Sundays and don't have to feel guilty about a single. fucking. bite.

Look up carb cycling as well, helpful to vary the amount of carbs you're ingesting from day to day to keep your body guessing - was another game changer for me [other than cutting them out after lunch 99% of the time, as well as reducing my carb portions to the actual food guide specifications, which seem freakishly small at first].


Originally Posted by TyrantGuardian

I'm in a very similar situation to you OP, except I have kept from re-gaining all the weight I lost. The thing that did it for me was to:

1. Keep it really fucking simple. Don't bother with any crazy diets or counting calories (unless that motivates you) or exercise that makes your stress levels shoot up. I just eat smaller portions and never stuff myself when I already know I'm full but otherwise have kept my normal lifestyle, more or less.

2. I make sure to avoid purchasing anything with more than 10g of sugar on the nutrition chart. Eating sugar makes me feel super hungry for the rest of the day and makes it completely impossible to follow the first point.

3. Don't beat yourself up and think you have failed permanently because you feel like buying a chocolate bar or a Ben & Jerry's once a week. It's fine, just don't binge that shit and maybe try spreading it out over the week instead of eating it all at once. I usually make that stuff last at least 2 days now, huge improvement :P
Just be mindful of the sugar cravings, obviously.

If you can't handle doing these on your own, don't be afraid to seek assistance from a therapist. The way you described your issue is definitely more of a mental framework thing than anything else. Trying to force yourself to exercise or intensely follow calorie counting apps if you actually hate doing those things won't do a thing.

again, another great post.

calorie counting does NOT work for me, nor for many people - your suggestion of just eating smaller portions is a very good one.

if you focus your meals around healthy proteins / healthy fats / veggies - you'll be surprised how satisfied you feel after consuming a very reasonable portion.

and yes, just fucking forget sugar people, abandon it, it's like nicotine or cocaine - once you pop you absolutely cannot stop with that shit.

save it for coffees out every now and again, special occasions, sugar should not be such a big part of your daily diet.

*also remember: carbs = sugar, really monitor your carbohydrate intake, as well as the quality of your carbs [ie - eat rice versus noodles, or at least rice noodles vs. wheat based noodles].

and avoid bread except for cheat days, and beer - just watch your fucking carbs they're making us all fat.
Hollywood Duo
Member
(10-18-2017, 07:58 PM)
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It is a daily struggle and it always will be for people like us. You lost 100 lbs so you know you are capable of getting fit. Try to find motivation to keep you going. Something important to you.
KeyboardThug
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(10-18-2017, 08:00 PM)
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Originally Posted by BeforeU

For that height, isnt 155 pounds less? I mean you fall into skinny category? I am 6.1 and 157 pounds. I feel skinny lol i am trying to gain weight atm.

I was thinking the same thing when i read his post. That seems really skinny to me. I am 6,2 and weigh 180 and I still feel skinny. I work out 4 times a week.
Lonely1
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(10-18-2017, 08:00 PM)
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I was going to ask you how hard it was for you to maintain your weight until you stopped caring.

Originally Posted by Hollywood Duo

It is a daily struggle and it always will be for people like us. You lost 100 lbs so you know you are capable of getting fit. Try to find motivation to keep you going. Something important to you.

This scares me. :S
family_guy
Member
(10-18-2017, 08:07 PM)
Here's some motivation:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z8FSbIoarzE
eot
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(10-18-2017, 08:16 PM)
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Originally Posted by curiouscharles

again, another great post.

calorie counting does NOT work for me, nor for many people - your suggestion of just eating smaller portions is a very good one.

Honest question: what do you mean it doesn't work? That you gain weight even with a calorie deficit or that you just find it too easy to slip up?
Lonely1
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(10-18-2017, 08:19 PM)
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Originally Posted by eot

Honest question: what do you mean it doesn't work? That you gain weight even with a calorie deficit or that you just find it too easy to slip up?

Calories aren't well researched for my country food, for example. Also, unless you do a complete metabolic study, is hard to know exactly how many calories you need.
Lunar15
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(10-18-2017, 08:20 PM)
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Know that struggle. Recently dropped from 220 to 180, but now i'm back up to 200.
TheTylerRob
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(10-18-2017, 08:21 PM)
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The worst is when you spend all that time dieting and working out and getting all hot and everybody starts complimenting you and saying how proud they are of you. Then you get fat again and you know when they see you they're judging the shit out of you.
Bitanator
Member
(10-18-2017, 08:23 PM)
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I here as well OP, gained 40 pounds again and just overall feel like shit. I know I can lose it but it is just so hard to take that initial step, I know it is infectious once you do and I hope I can find the motivation to just jump back in again and lose the weight
Harmen
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(10-18-2017, 08:34 PM)
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I haven't slipped back. Some periods I gain some but I always manage to steer away in time.

Some of my strategies:

-Ditched soda, fruit juice, milk etc. All drinks with calories basically. I learned to enjoy stuff like sparkling water.
-Never add sugar to anything. Just drink/eat what you get.
-No eating after 21:00 pm on regular days (better sleep as a result as well!)
-Is something reachable within 20 minutes of walking? Walk.
-Is a floor reachable by stairs? Take the stairs.
-Is something within 10 km? Take the bike.
-At least two to three days within a week I eat a salad as my meal.
-No regular fast food day anymore, just one in a good while.
-Do anything I like on, say, a vacation or at a party. Being on a real diet all the time wears and increases chances on falling back.
-No more than one or two beers or alcoholic consumptions on an evening/night.

Set reachable goals for yourself that you can sustain. Slowly build upon them instead of doing them all at once. Even if it doesn't allow you to lose a lot weight within a short period of time, this will work out for the best on the long term. Changing a lifestyle is not easy and is a lifelong project. So treat it as a lifelong project and take your time to develop a sustainable lifestyle that suits your needs.
Fliesen
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(10-18-2017, 08:38 PM)
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i really can't help you OP beyond maybe reminding you:

* 2 steps forward, 1 step back still nets 1 to step forward.
* you did it once, you'll be able to do it again. I understand that it's a struggle, because you definitely are 'addicted' to 'food' (or rather, whatever food does to your body and psyche)

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