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jongkookie
Member
(01-01-2016, 09:37 AM)
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From your demands, I hate to recommend the kit lens but it's probably the best option.

Yeah, you're not gonna get the delicious DOF but since you're doing indoor portraits, it really won't matter. Save the money for the lens and get a decent light kit, that'll be better in the long run.

But once you've got the cash to spend on glass, definitely pick up a 35mm for nature and an 85mm for portraits and nature closeups.

I'm no photography expert myself since I mostly do videography but I've experimented enough that I only really use 2 lenses for all my video work. A 50mm(technically a 75mm on my APS-C camera) prime for closeups/portrait style scenes, and a 28-85mm zoom for everything else.

Maybe look into "vintage" lenses? You can buy a variety of used lenses on eBay, then pair that up with an E-mount adapter, you'll be golden. But if you're just starting out, then forget about the vintage lenses. It's really not for beginners and is more of a frustrating challenge even for pros. I personally wouldn't do vintage lenses myself if I had the choice, but damn cameras these days don't have access to a physical aperture ring so eh lol.
Astral/H3X
Member
(01-01-2016, 02:04 PM)
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Originally Posted by jongkookie


Maybe look into "vintage" lenses? You can buy a variety of used lenses on eBay, then pair that up with an E-mount adapter, you'll be golden. But if you're just starting out, then forget about the vintage lenses. It's really not for beginners and is more of a frustrating challenge even for pros. I personally wouldn't do vintage lenses myself if I had the choice, but damn cameras these days don't have access to a physical aperture ring so eh lol.

I learned on vintage glass. The first lens I bought (as opposed to just the kits lens) was vintage glass, and a VERY large chunk of my photos are on vintage glass, and I vastly prefer them to modern AF glass.
So don't write them off that fast. ^_^

Vintage lenses are CHEAP and EFFECTIVE. With an a6000 you've got one of the best cameras you can possibly have for manual focus lenses. Yes, it'll take practice, but with the features that come with a Mirrorless camera, it'll be a lot easier. Focus peaking, exposure preview, and focus assist (where it zooms in on what you're focusing on) are your friends and will make MF lenses much easier than on say a DSLR.

THAT BEING SAID, I'm going to recommend the kit lens. You could probably very easily get a 35mm and a 50mm vintage lenses while staying in the budget of one of the two E Mount lenses, *BUT* unless you want to go all in with manual focus primes, there really are NOT a lot of good zooms that will cover the ranges you may want.
I jumped straight into the deep end with manual focus primes, and I feel like I came out alright, but let's just say I don't know what any of the automatic modes on my camera do. :x My dial really doesn't leave M mode.
RuGalz
Member
(01-01-2016, 05:54 PM)

Originally Posted by TrojanBlade

What would you guys do? I need a camera to use for indoors and outdoors for portraits and nature. Which would be the optimal choice to handle most situations with best quality. Thanks for the help.

Like others suggested, if you actually have experience with a 35mm prime and know it will probably work for you, get that. Otherwise, the kit lens. 50mm isn't versatile enough even though it will take nicer portraits.
jongkookie
Member
(01-01-2016, 08:48 PM)
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Originally Posted by H3XAntiStyle

I learned on vintage glass. The first lens I bought (as opposed to just the kits lens) was vintage glass, and a VERY large chunk of my photos are on vintage glass, and I vastly prefer them to modern AF glass.
So don't write them off that fast. ^_^

I learned on vintage glass too... photography class in HS, circa 2009... I thought my teacher was an asshole for strictly making us use film cameras. Not only were DSLR's fncking expensive back then, we also learned darkroom etiquette and all that stuff.

Videography wise, yeah I'd definitely stick with MF glass due to the aperture ring and the ability to really get creative with it.

Photography wise, it's a mix... for spontaneity I'd obviously prefer AF since I can just shoot and go. But this is all moot anyway as all my glass is MF so eh hahaha.

That said, it's great if you can start and learn on vintage glass coz you're better off in the long run. But it's not really necessary especially with modern cameras and glass these days. Anybody can now shoot a good photo, but what makes a photo great is the creativity involved in getting the shot.
TrojanBlade
Member
(01-01-2016, 09:11 PM)
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Thanks you all for the feedback. I think I am leaning towards the 35mm as it is more versatile. Will try to see if I can test at some store first.
ElectricKaibutsu
Member
(01-01-2016, 11:36 PM)
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Does anyone have experience buying cameras in Japan? I want to get an a6000 and my wife is going to be visiting Japan soon. We figure she could buy one tax free before she comes back to the States. But just looking at Amazon.co.jp as a price guide, they seem more expensive and less common than they are here. I'm not sure this plan is a good one.
John Blade
Member
(01-02-2016, 12:58 AM)
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Originally Posted by ElectricKaibutsu

Does anyone have experience buying cameras in Japan? I want to get an a6000 and my wife is going to be visiting Japan soon. We figure she could buy one tax free before she comes back to the States. But just looking at Amazon.co.jp as a price guide, they seem more expensive and less common than they are here. I'm not sure this plan is a good one.

Well, I will say this. If you buy a camera oversea and bring it back to your home country and if something happens to the camera and the lens, your warranty won't be valid in the home country you live. Basically, if you need to get your camera or lens fix, you can able can send it to Sony repair center but it mean you will have to spend money to get it fix even if it's under the warranty time period. That's I know if you buy oversea.

Also, the cost of buying the camera in Japan is more expensive than buying it in North America. It's kinda weird but that is something normal now.
MRORANGE
Member
(01-02-2016, 02:00 AM)
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NeoGAF Camera Equipment Thread | MK II






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