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Porcile
Member
(03-29-2017, 10:00 AM)
Where's the best damn doner kebab in Toyko? I'm getting some serious cravings. It's got to be lamb and its got to have some good chilli sauce, not chicken and not cheap pleb shit like garlic or burger sauce. Also, I don't want to eat it outside on some bench like those places in Ameyoko because I have some dignity but i'll do it if it's really good.
Aizo
音楽オタク
(03-29-2017, 04:04 PM)
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I have no kebab recs for such a kebab snob.
Kesnob.
urfe
Member
(03-30-2017, 02:53 PM)
urfe's Avatar

Originally Posted by Darksol

You should :)

I didn't, but I went to Less than Jake and Kemuri. Was a great show.
Aizo
音楽オタク
(03-31-2017, 12:16 AM)
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Nice. I bet Kemuri was awesome. Do you go to many shows? You should post in the Japanese music thread.
Porcile
Member
(03-31-2017, 02:51 AM)

Originally Posted by Aizo

I have no kebab recs for such a kebab snob.
Kesnob.

I'm not a snob, it's just there's a certain way a kebab needs to be done and presented for it to hit all the right marks and I've not found it. Japanese peeps just have some weird ideas about how certain types of typically cheap food should be. Kebab is one such food item, Indian food is another, but really it's "Nepalese" from what I've seen so far, and really it's only Nepalese in so much as the people come from Nepal. The food at those places tastes nothing like real Nepalese food. Oh and KFC.... Where's my Zinger and hot wings? Shit's not right... Japanese food and food in Japan can be amazing but sometimes it's just frustratingly rubbish.

Anyone who can tell me where the real good stuff so I can avoid the rubbish has my appreciation.
Last edited by Porcile; 03-31-2017 at 02:55 AM.
urfe
Member
(03-31-2017, 02:04 PM)
urfe's Avatar

Originally Posted by Aizo

Nice. I bet Kemuri was awesome. Do you go to many shows? You should post in the Japanese music thread.

I'm trying to go once a month now.

Seeing eastern youth and clammbon next month. Want to see T字路s soon too.

I should check it out!
midramble
Pizza, Bourbon, and Thanos
(04-01-2017, 01:57 AM)
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Originally Posted by Porcile

Where's the best damn doner kebab in Toyko? I'm getting some serious cravings. It's got to be lamb and its got to have some good chilli sauce, not chicken and not cheap pleb shit like garlic or burger sauce. Also, I don't want to eat it outside on some bench like those places in Ameyoko because I have some dignity but i'll do it if it's really good.

Couple of places in asakusa.

On a different note, any GAFers in beppu for the festival this weekend? Wife and I are here for our annual beppu binge and didn't realize it was the free onsen matsuri. May finally get to check out the theme park.
Aizo
音楽オタク
(04-02-2017, 04:34 AM)
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Originally Posted by Porcile

I'm not a snob, it's just there's a certain way a kebab needs to be done and presented for it to hit all the right marks and I've not found it. Japanese peeps just have some weird ideas about how certain types of typically cheap food should be. Kebab is one such food item, Indian food is another, but really it's "Nepalese" from what I've seen so far, and really it's only Nepalese in so much as the people come from Nepal. The food at those places tastes nothing like real Nepalese food. Oh and KFC.... Where's my Zinger and hot wings? Shit's not right... Japanese food and food in Japan can be amazing but sometimes it's just frustratingly rubbish.

Anyone who can tell me where the real good stuff so I can avoid the rubbish has my appreciation.

I'm the Indian Curry God King Emperor, so I can recommend the best Nepalese/Indian places. I've been to over 40 across Japan.

Top 3
Namaste in 長府、下関市、山口県
The spinach cheese naan is divine. All their curries are solid, with an especially delicious butter prawn.

Curry King 松江市、島根県
The Makuni Tonkatsu curry was what first got me, but after having the Kasmiri naan (a sweet naan with dried fruit, coconut, and jam) paired with the Ganesha special vegetable curry (tomato base, cashews, vegetables, cream, and butter), I could not go back to anything else.

Himalayan Caravan 東葛西、東京部
The most consistent Indian restaurant I've ever been to. Consistently incredible. Fantastic cheese naan, great butter chicken curry, tandoori chicken, vegetable curries. Honestly, you can't go wrong.

--

If you're more into South Indian, I can think of a great vegetarian place in Tokyo (great dosa).

If you prefer Indian food beyond curry and naan, there are a couple places in 西葛西 (that whole area has the highest concentration of Indian people in Japan most likely, so there happen to be a lot of great Indian restaurants), Japanese foodies seem to be into Delhi Dhaba for biryani and stuff.

There is also one more interesting place that comes to mind, which is a small place with the interior decorations of a dank, traditionally adorned, Japanese-run Indian restaurant in 小倉、北九州、福岡県 called ガネーシャ. This is the only Indian place I've been to in years that actually had a 激辛 curry suiting of its title.
Dingens
Member
(04-02-2017, 10:06 AM)
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Originally Posted by Porcile

Where's the best damn doner kebab in Toyko? I'm getting some serious cravings. It's got to be lamb and its got to have some good chilli sauce, not chicken and not cheap pleb shit like garlic or burger sauce. Also, I don't want to eat it outside on some bench like those places in Ameyoko because I have some dignity but i'll do it if it's really good.

Well... there is star kebab in Akihabara which didn't look too shabby and then there was another one in Roppongi near the crossing - although I don't know it it still exists...Last time I've been there was like 2013?
Porcile
Member
(04-02-2017, 11:05 AM)

Originally Posted by Aizo

I'm the Indian Curry God King Emperor, so I can recommend the best Nepalese/Indian places. I've been to over 40 across Japan.

Top 3
Namaste in 長府、下関市、山口県
The spinach cheese naan is divine. All their curries are solid, with an especially delicious butter prawn.

Curry King 松江市、島根県
The Makuni Tonkatsu curry was what first got me, but after having the Kasmiri naan (a sweet naan with dried fruit, coconut, and jam) paired with the Ganesha special vegetable curry (tomato base, cashews, vegetables, cream, and butter), I could not go back to anything else.

Himalayan Caravan 東葛西、東京部
The most consistent Indian restaurant I've ever been to. Consistently incredible. Fantastic cheese naan, great butter chicken curry, tandoori chicken, vegetable curries. Honestly, you can't go wrong.

--

If you're more into South Indian, I can think of a great vegetarian place in Tokyo (great dosa).

If you prefer Indian food beyond curry and naan, there are a couple places in 西葛西 (that whole area has the highest concentration of Indian people in Japan most likely, so there happen to be a lot of great Indian restaurants), Japanese foodies seem to be into Delhi Dhaba for biryani and stuff.

There is also one more interesting place that comes to mind, which is a small place with the interior decorations of a dank, traditionally adorned, Japanese-run Indian restaurant in 小倉、北九州、福岡県 called ガネーシャ. This is the only Indian place I've been to in years that actually had a 激辛 curry suiting of its title.

I will try Himalayan Caravan when I'm in Tokyo next. Thanks. I'm looking for that Mummy Porcile homemade flavour and style. Quick fry Indian stuff just ends up tasting so samey. You can tell they use 90% of the same ingredients for every dish... It's the same in the UK, but there were some local slightly shabby Gurkha places which had some authentic Nepalese food. Mostly because the only people who ate in those places were Nepalese people, and the regular curry house customers don't really want to eat goat...

Originally Posted by Dingens

Well... there is star kebab in Akihabara which didn't look too shabby and then there was another one in Roppongi near the crossing - although I don't know it it still exists...Last time I've been there was like 2013?

Nice. Thanks.

I tried a place in Kamakura near the Giant Buddha statue which had great reviews but it was absolutely awful. The old Turkish man who ran the shop is the nicest guy you'll ever meet though (and English speaking) which seems to bump up his review scores astronomically.

Anyone else ever tried this place and met the owner? lol
Valkerionseven
Member
(04-03-2017, 02:29 AM)
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Got back from my few days non planned trip to Osaka. Was great, got to make friends with a lot of nice/bad people haha. Became drinking buddies for the weekend with a few of the guys who try to get you to go into kabakura and a few of the ladies that work at one. They were super nice and funny to go drinking with after they finished work lol. Saw one of the guys in Nipponbashi the next day and 100% did not recognize him haha.

Was cool to have a random new friend show me around that area, amazing amount of tourists but was not too bad.

Also had no idea about the UFO catcher places with "service." Went in one and soon as I go in a cute girl who was totally my type comes up and gives me a ticket for blah blah blah service. Then I caught on she works there and she kept following me asking me questions about what anime I like what character I like, When I told her I don't really like anime that much but she kept asking me if I wanted to try anything. They had nothing I wanted but she kept asking since she works there. Then I realized the gimmick of having a cute girl encouraging you to play the games and keep trying lol. I realized it as I was walking away and saw them do it to another guy that went in and completely got caught lol.

Osaka is scary man hahahaha. Totally going back soon though, its fun every time.
Fisico
Member
(04-07-2017, 04:05 PM)
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Hello Japan Gaf,

After four trips lots of thinking and planning I will leave in late June to live 1 year in Japan with a working holiday Visa.

I haven't got a proper plan yet but I intend to stay in Tokyo for the most part (I booked an AirBNB for July and August already) and maybe climb Fuji-san a second time this summer, I will also stay in Yokohama in late October (recently registered to the Yokohama Marathon), Sapporo in February for the Snow festival and I intend to visit Shikoku for the first time (Matsuyama and also the Shimani bike road which looks dope) and also Kumamoto, Okinawa, Sendai, Akita if my budget allows it.

I don't have any particular question (yet), I intend to land with a budget around ~1 million yens, will work small jobs here and there, do some wwwoofing improve my japanese skill and... enjoy my time as much as I can!

If anything any basic tip from people on a working holiday visa there would help, or some basic knowledge that might be needed but not many people know about.

Currently I'm reading a few sociology/politic books (man what a mess for the latter lol) to have a broader knowledge of the culture besides the language and the usual knowledge everyone usually has JAPAN THE LAND OF SAMURAI NINJA SAKURA AND MANGA

Might be there if there's a Japan Gaf meetup later on too :)
StoOgE
First tragedy, then farce.
(04-10-2017, 07:46 PM)
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Hey Japan GAF.

My wife and I will be in Japan for the (3rd!) time in early May. I'm just now planning the trip because we are also going to HK/China before we arrive and that got the bulk of my attention since I "know" Japan pretty well. Now I'm scrambling cuz I'm on a plane to Hong Kong in a week :p

We want to bike the Shimanami Kaido (we hiked the Kumono Kodo last year and are looking for another off the beaten path adventure) and have hotel reservations but am running into an issue:

1) I want to rent two nice hybrid bikes from GIANT in Onomichi and return them at the GIANT store in Imabari but returning a bike to a different store requires a reservation over the phone. I can rent a bike from the city on the spot, but have heard they are questionable bikes. We are also doing the biking on May 6th. So, I know its the end of GW and have some fear that all the bikes will be rented already.

2) I want to work with a service that forwards luggage to your destination, but I need to speak with the hotel concierge and the only contact information I can find is a phone number (we are staying at the same brand hotel in Onomichi and Imabari).

Any Japan-GAFers willing to help me out by speaking with the hotel/Giant?

We are also looking at potentially relocating to Japan and are going to check out neighborhoods in Tokyo.

Right now we are thinking of Harajuku (not the insane part, the part up nearer to Shinjuku where the Swallows play) and Shimokitazawa. We lived in the upper west side of Manhattan and in central Austin now. So any neighborhoods that would be nice for early to mid 30 something aging hipsters that like park space, bars and restaurants would be great :)
dofry
That's "Dr." dofry to you.
(04-14-2017, 05:57 AM)
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Anyone ever bought a laptop using monthly payments?

I am thinking either a Macbook Pro or a Dell XPS. But, I have not bought anything using monthly payments ,ever, in here. So are there payment plans for it? Straight from Apple Store or buy from Yodobashi, Bic camera or Joushin. Can't use my credit card because it's kind of maxed out due to reloaction costs, reikin, shikikin and rent at the moment.

Originally Posted by Fisico

Hello Japan Gaf,

After four trips lots of thinking and planning I will leave in late June to live 1 year in Japan with a working holiday Visa.

I haven't got a proper plan yet but I intend to stay in Tokyo for the most part (I booked an AirBNB for July and August already) and maybe climb Fuji-san a second time this summer, I will also stay in Yokohama in late October (recently registered to the Yokohama Marathon), Sapporo in February for the Snow festival and I intend to visit Shikoku for the first time (Matsuyama and also the Shimani bike road which looks dope) and also Kumamoto, Okinawa, Sendai, Akita if my budget allows it.

I don't have any particular question (yet), I intend to land with a budget around ~1 million yens, will work small jobs here and there, do some wwwoofing improve my japanese skill and... enjoy my time as much as I can!

If anything any basic tip from people on a working holiday visa there would help, or some basic knowledge that might be needed but not many people know about.

Currently I'm reading a few sociology/politic books (man what a mess for the latter lol) to have a broader knowledge of the culture besides the language and the usual knowledge everyone usually has JAPAN THE LAND OF SAMURAI NINJA SAKURA AND MANGA

Might be there if there's a Japan Gaf meetup later on too :)

You need to register an address for the Resident Card's backside within the first two weeks of you arriving. Do that at the local ward office you are living in. Can probably be an Airbnb address.
You having a working Visa makes things super easy. Your work opportunities grow exponentially compared to illegal tourist visa workers.

Surround yourself with people who do not speak your language. Your skills will skyrocket.

If you are in Yokohama, send me a message. Maybe we can grab a beer or two.
Last edited by dofry; 04-14-2017 at 06:03 AM. Reason: added some quotes
Theodran
Junior Member
(04-14-2017, 01:47 PM)
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After over 5 months of gut wrenching wait I finally got the word today that my permanent residence application has been accepted and that I will be receiving my postcard to bring to the immigration beaureu somewhere between today and Monday/Tuesday.

I've been living in Japan for just over 9 years and married for 3.5 years so when I applied I had all the requirements cleared, but you never know what the person reviewing it is thinking.

I haven't been doing too hot at work lately since it is super stressful and what I have been doing exceeds my responsibility but the pay isn't reflected in it, so my residence permit not being tied to my job as it has been is a huge relief. If I would quit now (which I won't do) I could chill for a few months or even a year, getting unemployment benefits. Before I had to find a new job to make sure I was a legal alien whatnot.
Last edited by Theodran; 04-14-2017 at 02:02 PM.
Sakura
Foreigners: Give them an inch (of animu panties), and they'll take a mile.

DO NOT CONSORT WITH FOREIGNERS.
(04-16-2017, 07:33 PM)
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Originally Posted by dofry

Anyone ever bought a laptop using monthly payments?

I am thinking either a Macbook Pro or a Dell XPS. But, I have not bought anything using monthly payments ,ever, in here. So are there payment plans for it? Straight from Apple Store or buy from Yodobashi, Bic camera or Joushin. Can't use my credit card because it's kind of maxed out due to reloaction costs, reikin, shikikin and rent at the moment.

I tried to get the laptop earlier I posted about with monthly payments. They ended up calling and wanted me to fax my residence card, and were asking what my residence status was. Ultimately I was denied.
Instead I just bought it with my credit card with 12 revolving payments.
urfe
Member
(04-17-2017, 02:10 PM)
urfe's Avatar

Originally Posted by Sakura

I tried to get the laptop earlier I posted about with monthly payments. They ended up calling and wanted me to fax my residence card, and were asking what my residence status was. Ultimately I was denied.
Instead I just bought it with my credit card with 12 revolving payments.

I did this for my iPhone 7 loan. Guess it's オリコ standard procedure with foreigners. I have Permanent Residency so it was so issue. Apparently they're also doing a language check when on the phone.
Hasemo
(;・∀・)ハッ?
(04-17-2017, 03:49 PM)
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Originally Posted by urfe

I did this for my iPhone 7 loan. Guess it's オリコ standard procedure with foreigners. I have Permanent Residency so it was so issue. Apparently they're also doing a language check when on the phone.

By "iPhone 7 loan" you mean monthly payments with you phone bill?

If that's the case, I asked them how the system works when buying my 6+ and I was told that:
- It's done for all purchases over 100k yen
- It's like a credit card check, but easier to pass
- The check itself takes like 10 minutes

I don't think that residency matters as much, but maybe it depends on where you work. My 3 year old visa was ending about half a year into the payments, but I got iPhone 6 with monthly payments without any problems.
Sakura
Foreigners: Give them an inch (of animu panties), and they'll take a mile.

DO NOT CONSORT WITH FOREIGNERS.
(04-17-2017, 04:59 PM)
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Originally Posted by urfe

I did this for my iPhone 7 loan. Guess it's オリコ standard procedure with foreigners. I have Permanent Residency so it was so issue. Apparently they're also doing a language check when on the phone.

Yeah for the laptop they asked if my status of residency was permanent or not.
All these companies seem different though so you never know. I got a 2 year phone contract when I was on a 6 month WHV. And I got a credit card with a 500,000 yen limit as a student being in the country for like not even half a year.
Fisico
Member
(04-17-2017, 05:22 PM)
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Originally Posted by dofry

You need to register an address for the Resident Card's backside within the first two weeks of you arriving. Do that at the local ward office you are living in. Can probably be an Airbnb address.
You having a working Visa makes things super easy. Your work opportunities grow exponentially compared to illegal tourist visa workers.

Surround yourself with people who do not speak your language. Your skills will skyrocket.

If you are in Yokohama, send me a message. Maybe we can grab a beer or two.

Thanks for the advices, yeah I'm not too worried about work, I have a japanese friend I've known for a few years I'll try to hang up with native speakers as much as I can.

And gladly for a beer!
I intend to be in Yokohama in late October as stated, I already went there in 2012-2014-2015 but didn't visit much.
MMarston
Member
(04-19-2017, 02:56 AM)
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Hey there, JapanGAF. Just seeking some tourist advice here.

Anyway, this is far from final -- I've just been entertaining the thought real hard lately -- but there's some pretty good air fare prices to Tokyo for the first week of May, and I am kinda contemplating on whether I should just take the plunge and spend a week there right before I graduate university later in the month. This is kind of a big deal for me too since I've been meaning to do this for ages.

That said, I'm trying to come up with a hypothetical itinerary to do the math with and to my somewhat surprise, I'm actually blanking out in terms of places to visit in the city apart from the stereotypical stuff you see in the media (e.g. Shinjuku, Akihabara, etc.). So I'd really love some recommendation on what I can potentially do around the city and which places/wards to go to make the most out of maybe 7 to 10 days.

Also some other questions:
- First and foremost, language barrier -- how problematic will this be for me? I'm imagining like most heavily popular global cities, it may not be that difficult, but I'd like to get a good gauge beforehand.

- What's transportation(+prices) like around the city and what other sage advice do any of you have for tackling it?

- I'm thinking of maybe also going to Kyoto for maybe a day or two, so maybe throw me some ideas of what I can do there too. Also wanna know how feasible such a tangent may be considering my timeframe.

- Any good places/ideas for lodging? I mean, I'm starting at some nice hostels right now but it never hurts to ask in case I'm missing something.

Thanks.
Valkerionseven
Member
(04-19-2017, 05:17 AM)
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Originally Posted by MMarston

Hey there, JapanGAF. Just seeking some tourist advice here.

Anyway, this is far from final -- I've just been entertaining the thought real hard lately -- but there's some pretty good air fare prices to Tokyo for the first week of May, and I am kinda contemplating on whether I should just take the plunge and spend a week there right before I graduate university later in the month. This is kind of a big deal for me too since I've been meaning to do this for ages.

That said, I'm trying to come up with a hypothetical itinerary to do the math with and to my somewhat surprise, I'm actually blanking out in terms of places to visit in the city apart from the stereotypical stuff you see in the media (e.g. Shinjuku, Akihabara, etc.). So I'd really love some recommendation on what I can potentially do around the city and which places/wards to go to make the most out of maybe 7 to 10 days.

Also some other questions:
- First and foremost, language barrier -- how problematic will this be for me? I'm imagining like most heavily popular global cities, it may not be that difficult, but I'd like to get a good gauge beforehand.

- What's transportation(+prices) like around the city and what other sage advice do any of you have for tackling it?

- I'm thinking of maybe also going to Kyoto for maybe a day or two, so maybe throw me some ideas of what I can do there too. Also wanna know how feasible such a tangent may be considering my timeframe.

- Any good places/ideas for lodging? I mean, I'm starting at some nice hostels right now but it never hurts to ask in case I'm missing something.

Thanks.

On mobile so its a bit hard to link but, there is a Japan Travel GAF thread somewhere.

as for immediate advice.

Language Barrier is not so much a problem for tourists. If your just going to the usual touristy places there will most likely be some kind of English available. If not I would say the average person in Japan knows enough English and mimmickry to help a random stranger, but don't be surprised if someone says "I don't speak English and does not/is not able to help you"

Google maps works well here as well for getting around, use it well. Most station attendants and what not can point you in the right direction and get you the proper ticket. Unless you go to some random hole in the wall in the middle of nowhere you should be perfectly fine (The hole in the walls are fun!)

Trains are cheap, buses are cheap if you know where they are going and where to get on/off. Taxi's can be "expensive" if you are going more than 1~3km. Shinkansen (bullet train) is expensive almost year round there isnt much getting around that if you want to use it.

Lots of places to see and things to do in Kyoto, its a great place. A day or two is fine with a plan of what to see. Same for any place.

As for where to stay. No tips there really. There are some cheap places and some expensive places. Depends on your budget.
Laevateinn
Member
(04-19-2017, 05:28 AM)
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Originally Posted by MMarston

Hey there, JapanGAF. Just seeking some tourist advice here.

Anyway, this is far from final -- I've just been entertaining the thought real hard lately -- but there's some pretty good air fare prices to Tokyo for the first week of May, and I am kinda contemplating on whether I should just take the plunge and spend a week there right before I graduate university later in the month. This is kind of a big deal for me too since I've been meaning to do this for ages.

That said, I'm trying to come up with a hypothetical itinerary to do the math with and to my somewhat surprise, I'm actually blanking out in terms of places to visit in the city apart from the stereotypical stuff you see in the media (e.g. Shinjuku, Akihabara, etc.). So I'd really love some recommendation on what I can potentially do around the city and which places/wards to go to make the most out of maybe 7 to 10 days.

Also some other questions:
- First and foremost, language barrier -- how problematic will this be for me? I'm imagining like most heavily popular global cities, it may not be that difficult, but I'd like to get a good gauge beforehand.

- What's transportation(+prices) like around the city and what other sage advice do any of you have for tackling it?

- I'm thinking of maybe also going to Kyoto for maybe a day or two, so maybe throw me some ideas of what I can do there too. Also wanna know how feasible such a tangent may be considering my timeframe.

- Any good places/ideas for lodging? I mean, I'm starting at some nice hostels right now but it never hurts to ask in case I'm missing something.

Thanks.

Link to Japan Travel GAF Once you post there you'll get lots of help (including from me) but I don't want to clutter this thread much.
MMarston
Member
(04-19-2017, 05:49 AM)
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Originally Posted by Laevateinn

Link to Japan Travel GAF Once you post there you'll get lots of help (including from me) but I don't want to clutter this thread much.

Ah got it. Thanks.
urfe
Member
(04-19-2017, 11:10 AM)
urfe's Avatar
I'm in full job hunting mode now.

Was thinking to switch to translation, but recruiters are showing me many HR positions at companies that are probably easier to get and offer more money.

I finally have some experience, and sufficient Japanese, so I'm thinking that job hunting will be a lot less stressful this time.

also, I'm still looking for a Switch if anyone has any advice for getting one. Not much interest in Zelda, but Seiken Densetsu!
Hasemo
(;・∀・)ハッ?
(04-19-2017, 11:20 AM)
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Originally Posted by urfe

I'm in full job hunting mode now.

Was thinking to switch to translation, but recruiters are showing me many HR positions at companies that are probably easier to get and offer more money.

I finally have some experience, and sufficient Japanese, so I'm thinking that job hunting will be a lot less stressful this time.

also, I'm still looking for a Switch if anyone has any advice for getting one. Not much interest in Zelda, but Seiken Densetsu!

I don't think that translation pays great in most places (there are exceptions, of course) and I feel that it's quite hard to go higher in the chain when doing it. HR definitely sounds better and the experience would probably open doors to more companies if you decided to change your job again later.

As for the Switch, Nintendo announced that they will start selling the custom Switch (you choose the colors of Joy-Cons) on MyNintendo after April 21st.
Aside from that, checking twitter/news sites daily should make getting one on Amazon/Yamada Denki web/Yodobashi online easy - a few of my friends grabbed theirs recently after restocks.
urfe
Member
(04-19-2017, 11:17 PM)
urfe's Avatar

Originally Posted by Hasemo

I don't think that translation pays great in most places (there are exceptions, of course) and I feel that it's quite hard to go higher in the chain when doing it. HR definitely sounds better and the experience would probably open doors to more companies if you decided to change your job again later.

As for the Switch, Nintendo announced that they will start selling the custom Switch (you choose the colors of Joy-Cons) on MyNintendo after April 21st.
Aside from that, checking twitter/news sites daily should make getting one on Amazon/Yamada Denki web/Yodobashi online easy - a few of my friends grabbed theirs recently after restocks.

Thanks. Yeah, I'll talk to a translation recruiter soon, and will ask what they think about the change vs. staying in HR, or combining the two (e.g. social insurance, etc. translation, explanation). I don't want to make any less money than now, and would want to have my annual salary go up by a million ideally.

I check Amazon and Nintendo regularly, but I'm never on at the right time. Last time I was for Nintendo, but I only knew that because the site was down. :(
shounenka
Junior Member
(04-21-2017, 02:24 PM)
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Originally Posted by Theodran

After over 5 months of gut wrenching wait I finally got the word today that my permanent residence application has been accepted and that I will be receiving my postcard to bring to the immigration beaureu somewhere between today and Monday/Tuesday.

Guess I'll be the first to congratulate you on your PR, since it seems no one else did. And right before the ten-year mark, too.


Originally Posted by Hasemo

I don't think that translation pays great in most places (there are exceptions, of course) and I feel that it's quite hard to go higher in the chain when doing it.

This is accurate. Translation is more or less considered clerical work by Japanese managers despite the level of skill involved to do the job very well.

The exceptions Hasemo mentioned above include translation in the medical, patent and finance fields, and of course freelance. You can get yourself into coveted 8-figure territory if you entrench yourself properly or find the right company (even as an in-house translator).
urfe
Member
(04-21-2017, 10:32 PM)
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Originally Posted by shounenka

This is accurate. Translation is more or less considered clerical work by Japanese managers despite the level of skill involved to do the job very well.

The exceptions Hasemo mentioned above include translation in the medical, patent and finance fields, and of course freelance. You can get yourself into coveted 8-figure territory if you entrench yourself properly or find the right company (even as an in-house translator).

I talke with a translation recruiter yesterday, and it looks like due to a lack of firm experience, it would be a bit of a pay cut to get in the industry.

She recommended if I didn't want to do just translation, I look for work that includes translation, but is not specifically translation, like HR (like now), marketing, etc

One reason I'm interested in translation is to try and go freelance after 5-10 years and live more in the countryside. So I need to think if I want to keep that goal which path would allow me to get there.

Lots to think about.
shounenka
Junior Member
(04-22-2017, 06:43 AM)
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Originally Posted by urfe

I talke with a translation recruiter yesterday, and it looks like due to a lack of firm experience, it would be a bit of a pay cut to get in the industry.

She recommended if I didn't want to do just translation, I look for work that includes translation, but is not specifically translation, like HR (like now), marketing, etc

One reason I'm interested in translation is to try and go freelance after 5-10 years and live more in the countryside. So I need to think if I want to keep that goal which path would allow me to get there.

Lots to think about.


I didn't even know "translation recruiters" existed...lol. Anyway, her advice is sound.
You can get into freelance even if your work prior to that is only tangentially related to translation. I did the salaryman thing for eight years before going freelance; only my first two years were spent in a job that specifically asked me to be a translator. The remaining six were spent doing stuff that built on those skills indirectly (publishing, writing, investor relations, etc.).
dofry
That's "Dr." dofry to you.
(04-24-2017, 08:58 AM)
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Thanks for the answers regarding payments with CC or Orico loans. Currently I am pushing buying the laptop to a later date, so that I can instead apply for research funds and use those if possible.

I am new (3rd week) to Yokohama so any recommendations here? Must go and do, see?

I feel like a newbie after living in Kansai for years and here I have no idea where to go out to eat, drink and sing karaoke. Mostly I just take the train and travel to Shinjuku metal bars. Tips? Language is not a problem, only locations.
Porcile
Member
(04-24-2017, 09:48 AM)
Nogecho... Isezakicho....

Since moving here I have come much to prefer the spmewhat rougher areas lik3 Naka and Minami ku. Luckily I made some local friends who know these areas well because there's a lot to choose from. Obviously some places are great but some places are totally awful. I recommend trying to find a friend who knows these areas because maybe it will change your opinion of Yokohama from being a totally boring place to something with a bit more flavour and character. When you're eating in a restaurant and some local hooker is dabbing the forehead of a sweaty salaryman next to you, and no around you gives a fuck then you're in a good place...

I really don't recommend places like Chinatown or Minato Mirai unless you're on a date or something. Kinda overpriced and mostly average from my experience.
dofry
That's "Dr." dofry to you.
(04-24-2017, 11:27 AM)
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Originally Posted by Porcile

Nogecho... Isezakicho....

Since moving here I have come much to prefer the spmewhat rougher areas lik3 Naka and Minami ku. Luckily I made some local friends who know these areas well because there's a lot to choose from. Obviously some places are great but some places are totally awful. I recommend trying to find a friend who knows these areas because maybe it will change your opinion of Yokohama from being a totally boring place to something with a bit more flavour and character. When you're eating in a restaurant and some local hooker is dabbing the forehead of a sweaty salaryman next to you, and no around you gives a fuck then you're in a good place...

I really don't recommend places like Chinatown or Minato Mirai unless you're on a date or something. Kinda overpriced and mostly average from my experience.

Excellent. I've been to Nogecho, kinda, i think, but not that much so still a lot to see. I work at the university but getting the students/staff out is harder than expected. Everyone already assumes i am an alcoholic. Typical.

But, friends come to visit during golden week so we'll go check some new places out.
Porcile
Member
(04-24-2017, 12:22 PM)
I mean, obviously that main shopping street in Isezaki is full of chain restaurant rubbish but if you go down the side streets you'll find the local places. Definitely ask some locals for places in Naka and Minami etc you'll find good places for sure.
soultron
I will snowboard
into a PRISON
(04-24-2017, 03:50 PM)
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Has anyone been to the PaRappa pop up cafe and shop at Tree Village in Tokyo?

I'm dying to see better pictures of the merch that's on sale. (I live in Canada...)
shounenka
Junior Member
(04-24-2017, 03:59 PM)
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Originally Posted by Porcile

I mean, obviously that main shopping street in Isezaki is full of chain restaurant rubbish but if you go down the side streets you'll find the local places. Definitely ask some locals for places in Naka and Minami etc you'll find good places for sure.

Staying in line with the Yokohama theme, you'll have a LOT more fun if you progress on foot from Noge/Isezakicho toward Kannai. Two spots in the area between there and Yokohama Stadium (Akebonocho and Fukutomicho) are packed with all sortsa bars, many of which are full of local flavor/talent. You just have to look for them among the hostess/cabaret clubs.

Fukutomicho has an amazing reggae bar called exbodega that I used to go to every week when I lived in Noge. Saw Mighty Crown, H-Man, and Nanjaman there (all local acts). It also hosts Yokohama's Korean Town, if you want to grab something more authentic-tasting than yakiniku (just be prepared to pay for it....).

If you want to continue further down towards Ishikawacho/Motomachi, you'll find a few clubs there (mostly hiphop-oriented, but Yokohama night life is famous for that scene).

The "gaijin" scene (if that's your thing) in Yokohama has had better days. Things were a lot livelier when Pure (Kannai), Gas Panic (Sakuragicho) and their ilk were still around.

*My information might be a bit dated. It's been a while.
Last edited by shounenka; 04-24-2017 at 04:14 PM.
Guru-Guru
Member
(Yesterday, 05:02 AM)
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Speaking of translation, I managed to get some interviews for a couple of in-house translation jobs at game companies. I was kind of surprised I even passed the paper application phase, as I have only a small amount of freelance translation experience. Really my only other qualifications are passing the JLPT N1 and BJLPT about 2 years ago. I guess the problem will be is that my contract on JET lasts another 3 months, whereas both the companies seem to be looking to hire immediately. Both companies responded to my paper application 3 days after I submitted it. If I passed the interview stage (big assumption) I don't think I'd want to break my JET contract early since my BoE has treated me incredibly well these past 3 years. Tough call.

I'm ready to get fucked up on the SPI test, by the way. I can barely do basic math, and logic questions in Japanese will be a fun time! Oh well, just will have to nail the interviews.

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