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The Horror the horror
Member
(08-21-2014, 03:34 PM)
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A small tip from someone who's been there...


I used to be unfit and was prematurely graying (well, I still am). I honestly didn't think those two factors contributed at all to my lack of success during interviews and in securing a job until after I busted my ass in the gym and resorted to dyeing my hair. I was both surprised and disappointed at how much better I was doing at interviews, and recruiters were now pitching me to prospective employers MORE, whereas before most of them would drop me after the first meeting. Slimming down and looking younger (covering up the grays) helped me tremendously, and I eventually found a job. Would I have gotten this gig had I maintained the status quo? I don't think so, because I noticed my recruiters were more excited about presenting me to their clients only after I changed. I was meeting 2 potential employers a week, whereas before I was meeting maybe 1 every 3 weeks.

Anyway, long story short, employers - or at least hiring managers - are remarkably shallow and superficial. They don't just look at your experience, education, and character -- they look at YOU...literally. Most of them, from my experience, want young, energetic, and fit. So if you're unemployed and have the time to exercise and touch up your appearance, then I'd highly recommend you doing so.
Loxley
Member
(08-21-2014, 03:35 PM)
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The most recent soul-crusher for me was about a month ago when I had an interview for company that would have been genuinely excited to work for. They contacted me just seven hours after I had submitted my application to set up a phone interview - so already I think I've got a good shot. This was a job I was actually a bit over-qualified for, but it was meant as an entry-level graphic design job specifically for fresh graduates to get experience, so I was pretty much a perfect fit. The phone interview goes very well, they set me up for an in-person interview to go over my resume and portfolio. I went all-freaking-out for this interview. I bought a brand-new suit, tie, got my hair cut, bought a new portfolio for my work, made high-quality prints, and memorized the company's website inside and out. The in-person interview goes very well, and they tell me at the end of the interview that they'll get back to me in about two weeks once they're done reviewing the other candidates. So I think I've pretty much got this one in the bag.

Less than 24 hours later, I get an email from them with ol' "We decided to go in a different direction but we'll keep your resume on filaxnsacxiasnhdasudhasdczzzzzzzzzzzz." At first I was in the denial stage, "They said they'd get back to me in two weeks, not one day...they must have accidentally sent me this email. Yeah, that's probably what happened." Nnnnnnnnope. Losing out on that job hit pretty hard, it was the closest I'd come to employment in six months.

I graduated from college in December of 2012, been unable to find work since - so I guess I can be filed in the "useless degree" category. Losing out on that last opportunity was so deflating that I've decided I'm going to try and go into business for myself, so we'll see how that pans out.
Last edited by Loxley; 08-21-2014 at 03:37 PM.
Photolysis
Banned
(08-21-2014, 03:39 PM)

Originally Posted by Magnus

You just had to 'try hard'. Put your best foot forward and you'd get a job. It's all my parents' generation tells me all the time (baby boomers). They then think that lack of success now = not trying hard. No other mitigating factors seem to enter into their consideration of the situation. We must just not be trying.

My parents have had reality kick them in the face here. When they found out just how much effort it takes to land a minimum wage part time job these days when 30 years ago you could literally walk into them, they were amazed.

It's extremely difficult to land a job these days. Probably in part because of the legal risks that can blow up in a company's face if they're not careful.
Last edited by Photolysis; 08-21-2014 at 03:58 PM.
Mr Swine
Member
(08-21-2014, 03:52 PM)
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Originally Posted by Magnus

You just had to 'try hard'. Put your best foot forward and you'd get a job. It's all my parents' generation tells me all the time (baby boomers). They then think that lack of success now = not trying hard. No other mitigating factors seem to enter into their consideration of the situation. We must just not be trying.

Very easy to say when the boss to one of my summer jobs 6 years ago basically tells me how a shitty worker I am. And that is despite me losing my apartment I rented and my co worker got frustrated at me because I didn't do stuff fast enough or did it myself. It was my first time working :/
Vinci
Danish
(08-21-2014, 04:01 PM)
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Originally Posted by Mr Swine

Very easy to say when the boss to one of my summer jobs 6 years ago basically tells me how a shitty worker I am. And that is despite me losing my apartment I rented and my co worker got frustrated at me because I didn't do stuff fast enough or did it myself. It was my first time working :/

Let's talk about this. What sort of job are you looking for? And what sort of jobs have you had? Also, what sort of hobbies, organizations, etc. do you belong to?
Lonely1
Member
(08-21-2014, 05:09 PM)
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Originally Posted by Vinci

I'm in business, so I'm not sure how much of what I've done to secure employment is applicable for other fields, but...

Is good advice, but sadly not applicable to people without significant experience on the field.
Jroderton
Member
(08-21-2014, 05:19 PM)
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Got an online video interview coming up. What's up with that?
Fuchsdh
Member
(08-21-2014, 05:19 PM)
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Originally Posted by Photolysis

My parents have had reality kick them in the face here. When they found out just how much effort it takes to land a minimum wage part time job these days when 30 years ago you could literally walk into them, they were amazed.

This was one my parents didn't really get. I'm generally shy and averse to walking right up to me, so it sucked even more to go up to someone and ask them if they were hiring, but what made it worse was I quickly realized that really didn't work. Usually you're talking to people who have no involvement in the hiring process or just tell you to use the system or apply online anyhow. That's only likely to have any chance if you go to family-owned places.
Rash
Member
(08-21-2014, 05:19 PM)
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Originally Posted by Photolysis

My parents have had reality kick them in the face here. When they found out just how much effort it takes to land a minimum wage part time job these days when 30 years ago you could literally walk into them, they were amazed.

It's extremely difficult to land a job these days. Probably in part because of the legal risks that can blow up in a company's face if they're not careful.

Not just that, but competition is fierce.

Every year, thousands of people walk out of college with degrees, looking for jobs. My graduating class was around 1,400 I believe and that's from a major university.

At this point there are many factors but our parents and grandparents most definitely did not have to deal with the sheer size of the applicant pool.

There are just A LOT more people out there going for the same thing. It's really not a matter of bootstraps, it's a matter of dealing with our ever-increasing and ever-ambitious population, chasing the traditional "American Dream" which doesn't really exist anymore.

Most of our generation probably just wants to make it by, at this point. Never mind actually thriving in life.
Last edited by Rash; 08-21-2014 at 05:23 PM.
Ultimadrago
Member
(08-21-2014, 06:10 PM)
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Originally Posted by EmmanuelMunoz

I've got your back, man. Let me know if you need any help.

Thanks Emunoz, I very well may need it soon!
Magnus
Member
(08-21-2014, 06:22 PM)
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Originally Posted by Rash

Not just that, but competition is fierce.

Every year, thousands of people walk out of college with degrees, looking for jobs. My graduating class was around 1,400 I believe and that's from a major university.

At this point there are many factors but our parents and grandparents most definitely did not have to deal with the sheer size of the applicant pool.

There are just A LOT more people out there going for the same thing. It's really not a matter of bootstraps, it's a matter of dealing with our ever-increasing and ever-ambitious population, chasing the traditional "American Dream" which doesn't really exist anymore.

Most of our generation probably just wants to make it by, at this point. Never mind actually thriving in life.

That last line really hits home. I see peers and colleagues pining for their mortgage down-payments, bigger/better vacations, and of course, saving for their weddings. Some of us just want to be able to pay rent and pay for everyday expenses/life. Can't even begin to think about saving/RRSPs, the future, etc. lol. It's laughable to me.
I'm an expert
Banned
(08-21-2014, 06:25 PM)
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Originally Posted by The Horror the horror

A small tip from someone who's been there...


I used to be unfit and was prematurely graying (well, I still am). I honestly didn't think those two factors contributed at all to my lack of success during interviews and in securing a job until after I busted my ass in the gym and resorted to dyeing my hair. I was both surprised and disappointed at how much better I was doing at interviews, and recruiters were now pitching me to prospective employers MORE, whereas before most of them would drop me after the first meeting. Slimming down and looking younger (covering up the grays) helped me tremendously, and I eventually found a job. Would I have gotten this gig had I maintained the status quo? I don't think so, because I noticed my recruiters were more excited about presenting me to their clients only after I changed. I was meeting 2 potential employers a week, whereas before I was meeting maybe 1 every 3 weeks.

Anyway, long story short, employers - or at least hiring managers - are remarkably shallow and superficial. They don't just look at your experience, education, and character -- they look at YOU...literally. Most of them, from my experience, want young, energetic, and fit. So if you're unemployed and have the time to exercise and touch up your appearance, then I'd highly recommend you doing so.

No doubt. My industry loves to hire good looking, young people and I gravitate towards them more from my interview pools too.
HOMEBOY OVER HERE
Banned
(08-21-2014, 06:29 PM)

Originally Posted by Gooster

Applying for jobs especially online feels worse because of that feeling like it gets lost in a digital sea of applications.

The job tips though I've come across on GAF over the years have been far more helpful though than generic "STAND OUT!" articles.

what are some tips in your opinion?
aerts1js
Member
(08-21-2014, 06:30 PM)
If I had a degree and couldn't find a job after multiple years I'd heavily consider teaching abroad as the demand is high, pay can be quite good, and will most likely be a unforgettable experience.
I'm an expert
Banned
(08-21-2014, 06:34 PM)
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Originally Posted by aerts1js

If I had a degree and couldn't find a job after multiple years I'd heavily consider teaching abroad as the demand is high, pay can be quite good, and will most likely be a unforgettable experience.

lol..
Mr. Blonde
Banned
(08-21-2014, 06:38 PM)
I disagree with the point about cover letters. In my experience working in various finance jobs, no one reads them.

If one is required with the application, just make sure it has no glaring mistakes and is addressed to the correct company.
Strax
Member
(08-21-2014, 06:47 PM)
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Originally Posted by Photolysis

The worst part of the entire process is waiting. I can handle rejection, but being stuck in a limbo state is awful.

I'm transitioning careers and applied for a very good entry level position recently. Interview seemed to go well, and I was told to expect a yes or no response within 2-3 days; it's been over a week and I've heard nothing. Sadly due to circumstances, I've got to wait just under a week before I can even get in touch with the person to try to clarify what's going on, if anything.

And it's very easy to drive yourself mad when you start second guessing yourself. For all I know there was just a bit of a delay and I'm still in with a shot, or even they're planning to offer me the position. Or there's no chance, and they're being unprofessional and not letting me know. Or anything really. I have no idea.

Until this point, I've at least known where I stood (or had a very good idea) when it comes to a position. This current situation is probably the worst I've felt so far.

I applied for job as a "culture" journalist last month. Some days after the deadline I got an E-mail saying that 200 people applied for the job and they wanted to interview me and two others, so far so good. I went to the interview 22nd of July and after two weeks of waiting I sent an E-mail asking about it and got no reply and a week later I did again and got no reply. Now they've updated their website with employee info I can see they've hired for the job. I'm little pissed off but mostly shocked because they've already said that I was one of the top people that applied but treated me shitty despite being in an industry people last maybe 1-2 years and move on and are kinda hiring all year if they are a big newspaper/website.

Of course the person they hired knows the culture editor personally but while she's only written for a fashion website for less then a year I've worked for a major newspaper/website for 3 years, was a copywriter and have a BA in Media Studies and a diploma in Filmmaking. Well, that's life.
todd360
Member
(08-21-2014, 06:55 PM)
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Originally Posted by Mr. Blonde

I disagree with the point about cover letters. In my experience working in various finance jobs, no one reads them.

If one is required with the application, just make sure it has no glaring mistakes and is addressed to the correct company.

I watched a live usajobs.gov thing in which a guy who works for them taught the people in he stream what you need to do to find success there. He said that cover letters aren't usually necessary (on usajobs.gov) and that it might not even be read depending on who's doing the hiring.
Necrovex
Member
(08-21-2014, 07:03 PM)
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Originally Posted by I'm an expert

lol..

The way some Gaffers write about it, it seems relatively easy if you're a native English speaker to obtain a TEFL position in China, certain parts of Africa, or other parts of Asia.
Guesong
Member
(08-21-2014, 07:20 PM)
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Well I just came back from the interview I posted about earlier.

I wouldn't say I did badly, but boy did they take me off-guard with the format. T'wasn't an interview as much as it was additional timed tests, for which I did not do badly but I know I did not knock it out the park, considering my stress and the parameters given.

We'll see how it goes. It's something that would only likely start next year anyhow, so the grind continues.

(And if any Gaffer with hiring power resides around the Montreal, Canada area, let me know! Maybe I could be an asset!)
I'm an expert
Banned
(08-21-2014, 07:40 PM)
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Originally Posted by Necrovex

The way some Gaffers write about it, it seems relatively easy if you're a native English speaker to obtain a TEFL position in China, certain parts of Africa, or other parts of Asia.

It's easier to get than a McDonalds job. It's just always amusing to think people who are unhirable in their home country to do what they studied can some how get away with going to do a job they are even more unqualified for. And it's not their fault of course, just how the system is set up. But think for a second, would you want your child being taught in school by a 22 year old gafer who has no idea what they're doing? Because they were lost in life lol?
The Horror the horror
Member
(08-21-2014, 08:04 PM)
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Originally Posted by I'm an expert

No doubt. My industry loves to hire good looking, young people and I gravitate towards them more from my interview pools too.

We might be talking about the same industry. What field are you in?
boi
Junior Member
(08-21-2014, 08:10 PM)
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2 months unemployed here. I work a low-level job while searching for a job that matches my degree. When I have an interview I can take a day off. That way, I don't feel guilty about spending money. So keep your cool, and keep yourself occupied.
Necrovex
Member
(08-21-2014, 08:25 PM)
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Originally Posted by I'm an expert

It's easier to get than a McDonalds job. It's just always amusing to think people who are unhirable in their home country to do what they studied can some how get away with going to do a job they are even more unqualified for. And it's not their fault of course, just how the system is set up. But think for a second, would you want your child being taught in school by a 22 year old gafer who has no idea what they're doing? Because they were lost in life lol?

I can't say anything against this, considering I'll be going to Peace Corps next year for Public Health, and I have little experience in the field, besides some volunteer stuff.
Mr_Antimatter
Member
(08-21-2014, 08:40 PM)
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I know we have some fairly entry level positions here, as well as some advanced ones. IM me for the company name/site. We are here in Austin for the most part, though we have some folks elsewhere.

Searching for a job sucks, really sympathize with you folks. I've been there myself several times, and will be doing the same with my wife here fairly shortly (with a newborn on top of that).

Keep your chin up, and don't be afraid to take a lesser position to pay the bills and work your way up to what you really want to do. I took a pretty big pay hit to come here back int he day, though I was able to eventually get back to where I way and beyond.
Liquidsnake
Banned
(08-21-2014, 08:56 PM)
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I bombed my interview this morning. Guy was looking at the time and checking his computer screen most if the interview. :(
The Horror the horror
Member
(08-21-2014, 09:12 PM)
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Originally Posted by Liquidsnake

I bombed my interview this morning. Guy was looking at the time and checking his computer screen most if the interview. :(

I remember bombing one particular interview, the lady was monotonously bobbing her head up and down to all my responses, giving a half-hearted "Uh huh, uh huh" to all my answers without any follow up questions. Later on, my recruiter told me that the moment I removed my blazer in her office (the room was hot, with no AC) without asking, she was disinterested and wanted me to leave.
Okamid3n
Member
(08-21-2014, 09:12 PM)
The interviews definitely are soul-crushing, I don't think I've ever hated something as much as that. I've done yet another one two days ago and I'm still recovering.

What makes it worse is that I'm much happier now that I'm not working...you know, except for the money thing. It's a nightmare combo; doing an interview means putting myself through the most stressful, self-destroying process ever with the only reward being something which makes me profoundly unhappy.

Do I have an attitude problem? Obviously, yes. If someone has a miracle recipe for changing my attitude, though, I'm listening. It's not like I chose to feel that way.
Last edited by Okamid3n; 08-21-2014 at 09:22 PM.
sometimes i game
Member
(08-21-2014, 09:17 PM)
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Interviews are hard at first but once you get experience they become more like conversations about things you're comfortable with rather than a battle to prove yourself.

The worst thing about applying to jobs is uploading your resume, and then having to manually fill out every detail in your resume on a web form.

Email HR people directly or message on Linkedin too vs just applying.
aerts1js
Member
(08-21-2014, 09:25 PM)

Originally Posted by I'm an expert

It's easier to get than a McDonalds job. It's just always amusing to think people who are unhirable in their home country to do what they studied can some how get away with going to do a job they are even more unqualified for. And it's not their fault of course, just how the system is set up. But think for a second, would you want your child being taught in school by a 22 year old gafer who has no idea what they're doing? Because they were lost in life lol?

This still doesn't negate the fact that it can/should be a viable option to some. I'd rather be living abroad and saving $$ than living off the government in my home country and trying to "figure out life."
Guesong
Member
(08-21-2014, 09:30 PM)
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Originally Posted by The Horror the horror

I remember bombing one particular interview, the lady was monotonously bobbing her head up and down to all my responses, giving a half-hearted "Uh huh, uh huh" to all my answers without any follow up questions. Later on, my recruiter told me that the moment I removed my blazer in her office (the room was hot, with no AC) without asking, she was disinterested and wanted me to leave.

I wouldn't call that bombing, I'd call that to be confronted with some wacky people.
Liquidsnake
Banned
(08-21-2014, 10:54 PM)
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Really losing hope.
Cutebrute
Member
(08-21-2014, 11:02 PM)
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It sucks to see that there are others who feel the same way I feel right now, but it's also reassuring to know that I am not alone. I graduated with a BA four months ago and have looking for a job ever since. I graduated with a social science BA from a liberal arts school after three years, which didn't give me enough time to complete another major or take more than two of the most braindead internships out there. The school I attended is fairly prestigious, but it doesn't mean anything because I didn't develop any skills that would be appealing to most employers. Knowing to use Microsoft Office doesn't count anymore, and that's all I really have to show for my education.

Family and financial issues are keeping me from going to school again for now, and my family thinks I'm worthless for not getting a job with my costly education. I can't get a productive job that would lead toward a career, and I can't even get a retail job to fill in the time before I really get going with my life.

I'm too new to this problem to offer worthwhile advice, but I will say that everyone needs to hang in there. A positive attitude and positive environment can provide wonders for you if you let it.
I'm an expert
Banned
(08-21-2014, 11:07 PM)
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Originally Posted by The Horror the horror

We might be talking about the same industry. What field are you in?

Financial services, NYC area.
Freeza Under The Shower
Member
(08-21-2014, 11:27 PM)
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Become self-employed is really the only way to avoid them, aside from being born into a rich family.
Last edited by Freeza Under The Shower; 08-21-2014 at 11:38 PM.
todd360
Member
(08-21-2014, 11:51 PM)
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I had a job interview the other day for an entry level position. I think I did good. Anyways the problem is that it takes them 1-3 months to do a complete background check.
I'm an expert
Banned
(08-21-2014, 11:56 PM)
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Originally Posted by Cutebrute

It sucks to see that there are others who feel the same way I feel right now, but it's also reassuring to know that I am not alone. I graduated with a BA four months ago and have looking for a job ever since. I graduated with a social science BA from a liberal arts school after three years, which didn't give me enough time to complete another major or take more than two of the most braindead internships out there. The school I attended is fairly prestigious, but it doesn't mean anything because I didn't develop any skills that would be appealing to most employers. Knowing to use Microsoft Office doesn't count anymore, and that's all I really have to show for my education.


Family and financial issues are keeping me from going to school again for now, and my family thinks I'm worthless for not getting a job with my costly education. I can't get a productive job that would lead toward a career, and I can't even get a retail job to fill in the time before I really get going with my life.

I'm too new to this problem to offer worthwhile advice, but I will say that everyone needs to hang in there. A positive attitude and positive environment can provide wonders for you if you let it.

You can't get a job at Macy's or TGIF?
HOMEBOY OVER HERE
Banned
(08-21-2014, 11:59 PM)

Originally Posted by Strax

I applied for job as a "culture" journalist last month. Some days after the deadline I got an E-mail saying that 200 people applied for the job and they wanted to interview me and two others, so far so good. I went to the interview 22nd of July and after two weeks of waiting I sent an E-mail asking about it and got no reply and a week later I did again and got no reply. Now they've updated their website with employee info I can see they've hired for the job. I'm little pissed off but mostly shocked because they've already said that I was one of the top people that applied but treated me shitty despite being in an industry people last maybe 1-2 years and move on and are kinda hiring all year if they are a big newspaper/website.

Of course the person they hired knows the culture editor personally but while she's only written for a fashion website for less then a year I've worked for a major newspaper/website for 3 years, was a copywriter and have a BA in Media Studies and a diploma in Filmmaking. Well, that's life.

Hate when shit like this happens. Sorry to hear. Hope you find something that works for you

Originally Posted by I'm an expert

You can't get a job at Macy's or TGIF?

Do you want to work at Macy's or TGIF?

Getting a decent retail job at a decent business can take time.
Last edited by HOMEBOY OVER HERE; 08-22-2014 at 12:01 AM.
I'm an expert
Banned
(08-22-2014, 12:09 AM)
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Originally Posted by HOMEBOY OVER HERE

Hate when shit like this happens. Sorry to hear. Hope you find something that works for you



Do you want to work at Macy's or TGIF?

Getting a decent retail job at a decent business can take time.

he said he can't find anything to fill the time.. Those jobs fill the time. What exactly is "decent" retail?
Magnus
Member
(08-22-2014, 12:19 AM)
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Originally Posted by todd360

I had a job interview the other day for an entry level position. I think I did good. Anyways the problem is that it takes them 1-3 months to do a complete background check.

I don't think any employer on Earth is going to spend three months background checking an employee. Or even on the entire hire process. Even one month is a bit lengthy for most jobs below management.

Politics is the only type of job where you spend that long on the lead-up from application to hire or decline, I think. Haha.
HOMEBOY OVER HERE
Banned
(08-22-2014, 12:22 AM)

Originally Posted by I'm an expert

he said he can't find anything to fill the time.. Those jobs fill the time. What exactly is "decent" retail?

have you never worked a retail job before? there are nice places like Starbucks, trader joes, etc. which offer more pay and usually a more friendly work environment. I wouldn't wish a walmart job on anyone.
Magnus
Member
(08-22-2014, 12:31 AM)
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Originally Posted by HOMEBOY OVER HERE

have you never worked a retail job before? there are nice places like Starbucks, trader joes, etc. which offer more pay and usually a more friendly work environment. I wouldn't wish a walmart job on anyone.

As someone who's worked tons of retail while in school at many retailers, I'll concur with this statement. And for the record, while Starbucks was an excellent employer in terms of quality of life and perks/benefits, etc., the pay was the same or worse as everywhere else. Mere pennies above minimum, as a barista, in Toronto. ($10.45 an hour) The weekly tipout was a mere $5-10, on average.
I'm an expert
Banned
(08-22-2014, 12:36 AM)
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Originally Posted by HOMEBOY OVER HERE

have you never worked a retail job before? there are nice places like Starbucks, trader joes, etc. which offer more pay and usually a more friendly work environment. I wouldn't wish a walmart job on anyone.

I specifically said macys for retail and tgif for food service.. I would put those above walmart and mcdonalds.. retail is still retail. It's for high school kids and old people. They're all shit.
HOMEBOY OVER HERE
Banned
(08-22-2014, 12:37 AM)

Originally Posted by I'm an expert

I specifically said macys for retail and tgif for food service.. I would put those above walmart and mcdonalds.. retail is still retail. It's for high school kids and old people.

spoiled rich kid detected
freakzilla149
Banned
(08-22-2014, 12:38 AM)
I experienced this for the first time this summer. Never again.

To make matters worse - because of the first time looking for jobs thing - I got really emotionally invested in a job for which I was rejected. Fuck that was harsh.
Magnus
Member
(08-22-2014, 12:38 AM)
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Originally Posted by I'm an expert

I specifically said macys for retail and tgif for food service.. I would put those above walmart and mcdonalds.. retail is still retail. It's for high school kids and old people.

Hah. It may be intended that way, but have you looked at who's working retail these days? 20-30-somethings, everywhere. Every one of my coworkers at 4 retail outlets since 2008 was 20+, and over half had degrees/diplomas, with at least half of those people actively looking for something in their fields. We had celebratory sendoffs for fellow baristas when they got something in their field. Haha.
HOMEBOY OVER HERE
Banned
(08-22-2014, 12:40 AM)

Originally Posted by Magnus

Hah. It may be intended that way, but have you looked at who's working retail these days? 20-30-somethings, everywhere. Every one of my coworkers at 4 retail outlets since 2008 was 20+, and over half had degrees/diplomas, with at least half of those people actively looking for something in their fields. We had celebratory sendoffs for fellow baristas when they got something in their field. Haha.

not to mention not everyone comes from a family that sends them to or prepares them for college or a job in finance in NYC
I'm an expert
Banned
(08-22-2014, 12:41 AM)
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Originally Posted by HOMEBOY OVER HERE

spoiled rich kid detected

..what.. Yes, I'm rich now, but I worked at burger king and in the mall as a kid like anyone else. Except when I wasn't a kid anymore I stopped. Retail jobs are specifically created for people who are young or old as a time filler. The fact that anyone can do them is why the pay is so low. The poster I quoted specifically said so himself, that while he is looking for his field's job he wants a time waster retail. It doesn't matter if he works at Costco or Walmart, it's all going to be shit to him because he doesn't belong there.

Originally Posted by HOMEBOY OVER HERE

not to mention not everyone comes from a family that sends them to or prepares them for college or a job in finance in NYC

I was lower middle class growing up and in trouble with the law. I had no problem going to ivy league by playing the game that's open to anyone. Get good grades and one SAT score and enjoy your free education.
Last edited by I'm an expert; 08-22-2014 at 12:45 AM.
kutthoat5150
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(08-22-2014, 12:49 AM)
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any business people here have experience with businesstraining.com? I just got my MBA but hate having a degree so board in the business field, I'm looking to add some certifications to my resume in a couple areas that I'm interested in so it'll look better on applications and was wondering if anybody has feedback on that online program.
I'm an expert
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(08-22-2014, 12:51 AM)
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Originally Posted by kutthoat5150

any business people here have experience with businesstraining.com? I just got my MBA but hate having a degree so board in the business field, I'm looking to add some certifications to my resume in a couple areas that I'm interested in so it'll look better on applications and was wondering if anybody has feedback on that online program.

..what concentration is your mba? What industry are you in?

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