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Gowans
(07-05-2011, 04:53 PM)
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"If you run, you are a runner.
It doesn't matter how fast or how far.
It doesn't matter if today is your first day or if you've been running for twenty years.
There is no test to pass, no license to earn, no membership card to get.
You just run."

-- John Bingam

Everybody can be a runner. You can do it anywhere, anytime. Maybe you get into it for the physical benefits, particularly weight loss... but it's the mental benefits that will impact you most: focus, freedom, stress relief, mental toughness, purpose, perseverance and patience. Oh, and you'll look better and improve your sexual performance.

Running is self-expression and self-discovery. So why not share your adventures and learn from others? Your ability, experience and time splits aren't important here... if you run, you're one of us: welcome to the GAF Running Club!


"It's very hard to understand in the beginning that the whole idea is not to beat the other runners.
Eventually you learn that the competition is against the little voice inside you that wants to quit."

-- George Seehan

Motivation is key. It's different for everyone and it changes over time. Today you're reading this thread. Tomorrow GAF may inspire you to go for a walk or jog or run a marathon. Never run aimlessly: set goals.

Your goal should have personal meaning (don't let others set goals for you) and be challenging yet doable (be honest about your abilities.) Sharing your goal with people who support you, like family, friends, partners and fellow GAFfers builds commitment and holds you accountable. Because of real life, injury and the release of your favorite videogame, you will fail some goals. Don't sweat it... Learn from the experience. Set a new goal. Go run.

Tips for beginners:
- Getting off your butt and out the door is a big step. Don't worry if you can't maintain pace over a significant distance, your first priority is getting used to moving. Even a brisk walk builds the stamina and muscles you need to eventually run properly. A lot of beginner programs alternate walking and jogging for this reason. Be patient: speed will come.
- Couch to 5K is a proven beginner program supported by podcasts, a website and a mobile app to get you in shape.
- Invest in shoes that fit you: get your first pair at a running store where staff can look at your footstrikes and posture. Heed their advice even if the shoes they recommend don't have the color or model you like. Just as boxers don't wail on bags without good gloves, your feet should not be pounding the ground without proper protection. Oh, and don't skimp on the socks... you want those fitting snugly to prevent blisters.
- Go easy because your heart and lungs will improve much faster than your joints and muscles. It's not the distance that kills you, it's pacing. Nothing hurts a beginner's motivation more than injury or the lethargy that follows overtraining. So don't run until exhaustion, there should always be 'gas left in the tank'. Bonus: you'll be in a wonderful mood for the rest of the day.
- Running in bad weather is surprisingly comfortable and even enjoyable. You'll learn to appreciate rain more than heat. Never let the weather deter you from going out the door. People will think you're nuts... just grin like a loon. We understand.




“Running is a mental sport, more than anything else.
You're only as good as your training,
and your training is only as good as your thinking.”

-- Lauren Oliver

Running is a natural motion but that doesn't mean you can't improve your form. Your running form determines how many steps you take per minute (which is called 'turnover' or 'cadence'.) There are whole books written about running form but here are a few pointers to get you going:
- Make sure your feet land under your center of mass. If they land in front of you ('overstriding'), you're braking your momentum with each step. It also heightens the impact which hurts your knees over time. If you do it right, you'll likely land on your midfoot instead of your heel because your hips are above your feet at the moment of impact. To accelerate, lean forward (moving your center of mass) instead of trying to 'reach' further with your strides. Get used to increasing / decreasing your turnover (and pace) by leaning forward or back.
- Swing your arms in the direction you're moving, not across your body. Keep the angle of your elbows at 90 degrees throughout the swing (so you don't waste energy.)
- Keep your head held high (visualization: ears above your shoulders.) This forces you to keep a straight posture and raises your knees higher with each stride, covering more distance without overstriding. Make sure your shoulders don't rise involuntarily, keep them low and back to release unneeded tension.

If you want to look good running, improve your form. Onlookers won't notice your actual speed but they'll definitely notice the quiet strength of a runner dashing past with a straight back and soft, rapid footfalls.




“There are three reasons I failed.
Not enough training.
Not enough training.
And not enough training.”

-- Haruki Murakami,

SHOES

Obviously your choice of shoes matters... but the options can be overwhelming. Most shoes you see in stores are trainers. They are meant to protect your feet from ground impact and instability due to poor running form. For this reason, they're relatively heavy and rigid in key places. For most runners, this is all ever you need. The advantages of other shoes (light trainers and racing flats) are only a consideration for faster, more experienced athletes as they sacrifice cushioning and stability for less weight.

The biggest consideration when choosing shoes is your running gait, the way your feet move through the cycle of one step to the next. This is hard to judge for yourself which is why we recommend visiting a running store for advice. You will have one of three possible gaits: neutral (foot rolls slightly inward at the strike), over-pronation (exaggerated inward roll which twists your knee and ankle and puts them at risk of injury) or supination (foot rolls outward on impact which doesn't absorb the shock effectively.)



Most runners tend to over-pronate and need shoes that offer extra stability (usually achieved by hardened portions around the ankle.) Supinating runners need extra cushioning and neutral runners get by with just a little arch support. Shoe brands tend to classify their lines as 'Stability' (for over-pronators), 'Neutral' (for neutral runners) and 'Cushioning' (for supinators.)

For rough terrain, there are trail shoes which are essentially modified hiking boots. They offer increased traction, durability and won't get you stuck in deep mud. However, don't underestimate the power of regular trainers - they are perfectly serviceable to cross a few miles of woodland under normal circumstances.

A recent trend is barefoot or natural running, which has popularized the minimalist shoes. The original brand is Vibram but all major manufacturers offer this type now. These are meant to simulate the effect of running with the bare sole in direct ground contact while still providing protection against cuts. Many people swear by it and proponents claim increased performance and less injuries. However the scientific evidence of these claims is still inconclusive and they're not the best choice for beginners.

AUTOMATED TRACKING

You probably want to keep track of your goals, performance and training schedule with the use of an app or website. Since most modern phones have on-board GPS, you don't need specialized fitness trackers or runner watches if you're willing to carry your phone with you (which is recommended for personal safety.) Popular phone apps with GPS tracking and performance measurement include:

Endomondo: Versatile and lets you log other activities. (IOS / Android)
Strava: Lets you challenge activities of people on your friends list. (IOS / Android)
Runtastic: Swiss army knife of apps with sleek interface (IOS / Android)
Nike+ Running: Integrates with Facebook for live encouragement (IOS / Android)
RunKeeper: Good training plans for all levels (IOS / Android)
MapMyRun: Integrated navigation, lets you trace routes made my other runners (IOS / Android)

These apps all have the same key features so it comes down to your preference and which is popular in your social circles.

The best place to secure a phone is at the small of your back close to your center of mass but not all running clothes have this option. If you carry your phone on your arm in a special sleeve or in your pants pocket, make sure you alternate sides between runs - otherwise the asymmetric weight will negatively influence your running form.

OTHER GADGETS

Of course runner watches are the superior option for weight, ease of access and accuracy. This market is rapidly changing with the rise of smart watches so we'll stay away from recommendations in this OP. Brands you want to look into are Garmin, Polar, TomTom, and Suunto.

Heart rate monitors can be useful tools to tweak the intensity of your training. Many runners fall into a rhythm and don't add enough variation from run to run; heart rate monitors can help you with that. However, it's preferable to learn how to read your own body without the help of gadgets. Experienced athletes can tell their pace by feel alone. On a related note: music and audio books can make runs more fun and push your performance... but they're also distractions from body awareness. Try to run 'unplugged' every so often to hear your own footfalls and experience your body's effort and fatigue.


"We were designed to move.
Our bodies are bodies that have walked across vast continents.
Our bodies are bodies that have carried objects of art and war over great distances.
We are no less mobile than our ancestors.
We are athletes.
We are warriors.
We are human.”

-- John Bingham

TRAINING BASE

For many runners, their goal is to finish or perform in a race whether it's a local 5K run or a classic marathon. You will find many suitable training plans to help you work towards race day. However before you dive into a training plan, make sure you have a good training base: are you physically and mentally capable of performing at the level of the training plan? If you're a beginner, you could go straight into a marathon program and even finish... but doing so without a training base is considerably less fun and puts you at risk of injury and burn-out. So be patient and use smaller goals as stepping stones to your big goals: if you want to run a marathon, work towards a few shorter races first. Focus on finishing before you start worrying about personal records and time splits. Beginner programs are all about building the base: long walks alternating with short jogs. After a few weeks of that, you may get impatient and itch to just run... but hang in there. Your training base will sustain you when the program finally cuts you loose. No need to rush: you're a runner and have a lifetime of challenges ahead of you.

WARMING UP

Before any run, you want to elevate your body temperature and prepare mentally. Warm muscles and good focus (=no stress) make your body more flexible which lets your perform better with less chance of injury. How you achieve this is up to you: a 5 minute walk works just as well as a set of lunges, body weight exercises, a jumping rope or some dynamic stretching. Whatever you do, it should elevate your heart rate slightly and make you feel comfortably warm outside. Make your warm-up a consistent ritual so your brains knows it can relax as soon as you start the motions.

TRAINING VARIATION

A good training program consists of different types of runs. Variation is fun and leads to huge performance gains. The basic building blocks of runner training are:

- Long runs: steady tempo with good breathing over long distance, for endurance gain.
- Intervals: timed bouts of high speed (not sprints) alternating with jogging/walking, for speed gains
- Fartlek: unpredictable and varying bouts of high speed (not sprints), alternating with jogging/walking, for speed and pace gains.
- Easy runs: slow tempo with easy, comfortable breathing, for recovery
- Hill training: repetitions of running against elevation, for strength gains

Not every program will incorporate all building blocks but most will have at least three of them. There is one more crucial building block for runners: rest days. You MUST give your body time to rest and harden itself between periods of high effort. You won't get stronger and faster on training days: the gains will happen in the downtime, as your muscles recover and grow. Whatever your goal, you'll want a training program with variation and sufficient rest.

COOLING DOWN

At the end of your run, you want to help your muscles recover and flush the metabolic by-products from your body. So don't stop dead: keep moving, gradually decreasing the effort. If you don't, you'll be punished with soreness and stiffness as soon as you sit down for a while. Cooling down is a good time to incorporate form-improving drills and flexiblity-enhancing stretches.

CROSS-TRAINING

Many runners only cross-train when they are forced to: because a training program demands it or because an injury prevents regular training. Beginners find the prospect of even more activity daunting. But regular cross-training sessions can have surprisingly large effects on your running performance and overall fitness. When choosing a supplemental sport, the biggest consideration is whether the cross-training impacts your joints: your ankles and knees are already under a lot stress from running, so explosive sports like tennis, basketball, martial arts etc. increase your risk of injury and hamper your recovery. Swimming is the classic cross-training of choice because it's a highly anaerobic full-body exercise with no joint impact. Don't disregard strength training either: better body symmetry lets you run faster and more efficiently. Also, FitGAF is full of cool people.


“I don't run to add days to my life,
I run to add life to my days.”

-- Ronald Rook

Log off. Shut down. Go run. The road is a good listener and we'll be here when you get back.
Last edited by Gowans; 06-19-2015 at 11:37 PM.
Neuromancer
The Mayuh of f'n Bawston
(07-05-2011, 04:56 PM)
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I'm going to give that podcast a try. Sounds like it'd be real helpful. I'm a terrible runner, even at my prime (college) I could barely pull off a 5K. I'm horrendously out of shape now.
spiderman123
Member
(07-05-2011, 04:57 PM)
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Good luck on your marathon.
JonCha
Member
(07-05-2011, 04:59 PM)
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Next month is when my recovery from my operation last year will be done. Can't wait to start running again. :)
ultron87
Member
(07-05-2011, 05:02 PM)
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I think I might try that podcast. I've looked at several similar plans, but my lack of any sort of timing device made doing the X seconds of running + X seconds of walking thing tough. I'd always just try to guess it and tire myself out more than I should.
Bulbo Urethral Baggins
Banned
(07-05-2011, 05:03 PM)
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I don't think I have any good tips or advice to offer. But, just want to say that I started running about 10-15 years ago and it has become my favorite hobby. It's bordering on addiction-- if not full blown addiction. It's a great natural high. I was wanting to train for a marathon but I have bad knees and I feel like it will do more harm than good to my body.
However, last year I was able to run a half marathon with little problem.
I guess my only advice is for people just starting and that is to take the time to get fitted in shoes that are right for your feet and running style. It's really a necessity.
Gowans
(07-05-2011, 05:03 PM)
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I've always hated running but it needs to be done got just over two months to get from total unfit to 13.1miles in 2-3 hours.

Going to start easy this week, every other nights gona to be a run start with 2-3miles with lots of stops.

I'm 6'5" and a big boy now so the only thing I'm worried about is my knees taking the weight. Got some great shoes so feet should be fine.

I'll record my runs with endomondo so if you join the group don't be cruel, total beginner here.

The Mrs sister wants to come with me, last thing I need but said I would shes had a hard time of it at the mo so will do her good too, will be good for me, makes sure I try really hard.
TylerD
Member
(07-05-2011, 05:15 PM)
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I need to get back to the gym (I only like running on treadmills) and start running again. I listen to a lot of trance and DnB when I run and when a particularly good song comes on and you get that second wind and can kick up the pace another notch or two or three feels so damn good.

If you are looking for good earbuds for running, I can't recommend these enough. They are the only buds I have been able to use without falling out of my ears. Nothing else fits worth a darn and they have pretty solid bass.

Ironman Yurbuds
elrechazado
Member
(07-05-2011, 05:17 PM)
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Gear recommendations: Run barefoot where possible, in vibrams where not. Born to run baby.
otake
Doesn't know that "You" is used in both the singular and plural
(07-05-2011, 05:20 PM)
I've been running for a 2 years now. Still can't do a marathon. I do want to, I may need a training program.
Urban Scholar
Member
(07-05-2011, 05:23 PM)
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I love running because it clears my head of any distractions. subscribed
captscience
Member
(07-05-2011, 05:28 PM)
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Subscribed.

I'm just about to start a 12 week ramp up to the Chicago Marathon.

Started running 2.5 years ago and ran the NYC Marathon last November.

Lace em up GAF!
castlegar
Member
(07-05-2011, 05:32 PM)
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Great thread idea, subscribed. I started running when I wanted to lose a bunch of weight, lost it, and kept on with it. Currently training for some bigger marathons and would love to get some tips and perspective
arglebargle
Member
(07-05-2011, 05:35 PM)
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i have used and liked hal higdon's programs for marathon training.

http://www.halhigdon.com/marathon/Mar00index.htm

in terms of gear, i run in asics nimbus, a wicking t-shirt, and for sufficiently long runs, band aids on the nipples. also for sufficiently long runs, a water belt is awesome.
Gowans
(07-05-2011, 05:36 PM)
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Right I'm off on a 30min run/walk/jog/walk now.

Let's see how well I can do, fingers crossed for the knee.

Podcast on, weather good endomondo started.
Stet
Banned
(07-05-2011, 05:39 PM)
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I'm running a 10-miler in August. I can do the 16.1 km this entails just fine -- in the evening after a full day worth of meals in me. I have a lot of trouble running in the mornings for some reason, even if I eat a lot of carbs the night before.

For now I'm sidelined, too, with a case of runner's knee. I'll give running another shot this weekend. It's been two weeks since I've been out and I'm feeling antsy.
arglebargle
Member
(07-05-2011, 05:42 PM)
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Originally Posted by Crucified

I'm running a 10-miler in August. I can do the 16.1 km this entails just fine -- in the evening after a full day worth of meals in me. I have a lot of trouble running in the mornings for some reason, even if I eat a lot of carbs the night before.

For now I'm sidelined, too, with a case of runner's knee. I'll give running another shot this weekend. It's been two weeks since I've been out and I'm feeling antsy.

i rarely run in the mornings also, even when im in training. to me it comes down to water. when i wake up and run, ive spent the previous 8 hours not drinking enough water, whereas if i go after work i can drink a lot over the course of the day. not sure if thats a common issue.
Bradlums
Member
(07-05-2011, 05:47 PM)
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Was just about to make this thread, glad to see there are other runners on gaf. As for my current situation, I'm trying to increase the mileage right now to get ready for cross country season in the fall. 5 mile races and I'm looking to run below 28:00 this year. Also, gonna be running my second marathon in December and am hoping to get under 3 hours this time. 10 minutes away.

I'd be happy to give anybody training tips, as running is one of the few subjects I feel i can give accurate and helpful advice. Hopefully I can contribute to the OP in the near future. Subscribed :D

Originally Posted by arglebargle

i rarely run in the mornings also, even when im in training. to me it comes down to water. when i wake up and run, ive spent the previous 8 hours not drinking enough water, whereas if i go after work i can drink a lot over the course of the day. not sure if thats a common issue.

I used to have a similar problem. Went from practicing in the afternoon after school everyday to practicing at 6am when I moved from high school to college cross country. Never thought I'd be able to get a good workout when I was half asleep but I've found running in the morning is especially rewarding during the summer because it's much cooler and I can normally push myself much farther.
Last edited by Bradlums; 07-05-2011 at 05:50 PM.
psychicpsych
Junior Member
(07-05-2011, 05:51 PM)
I also recommend using anti-chaffing substances like body glide for long runs.
Shiv47
Member
(07-05-2011, 05:51 PM)
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I ran my first marathon over Memorial Day weekend, so I've been lazing it up since, but I'm probably going to run a half in October that I need to start gearing up for. I use Endomondo on my bike, but I'm not gonna carry my phone around running. I use a Garmin GPS watch for that, which provides all the relevant data I might need. I would second the recommendation for running barefoot style as well; much easier on the body.
distantmantra
Member
(07-05-2011, 05:55 PM)
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I ran the Seattle Rock and Roll 1/2 marathon on June 25th. This was the second year in a row I did it, and the plan is to do it every year as a way to kick off my summer vacation from work. It's the only one I do yearly, the rest of the time I just run 5-6 miles at a time.
swordfishtrombones
Member
(07-05-2011, 05:59 PM)
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I try to run 5k (in 30 minutes...) everyday. I started years ago when I tried to loose some weight, and I've become completely hooked. It's 30 minutes of completely emptying my brain while listening to either the latest Bombcast or just random songs on my mp3 player. I feel bad when I don't run for a few days, I get really restless. No matter what weather, I go out. Getting soaked and then returning to a hot shower is so good.

I've been doubting to enter a half-marathon. Part of me wants to see if I can do it (I can easily finish a 10k in 50 minutes or so), but I'm afraid that I need to start using schedules etc., which messes with my "trainers on, run & get tired" mentality.

Edit: I tried running in the morning for a while, but after taking a shower and biking to work, I keep sweating like crazy for an hour or so, which looks silly. How do you guys cope with that? Or am I the only one?
arglebargle
Member
(07-05-2011, 06:05 PM)
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Originally Posted by Bradlums

Was just about to make this thread, glad to see there are other runners on gaf. As for my current situation, I'm trying to increase the mileage right now to get ready for cross country season in the fall. 5 mile races and I'm looking to run below 28:00 this year. Also, gonna be running my second marathon in December and am hoping to get under 3 hours this time. 10 minutes away.

I'd be happy to give anybody training tips, as running is one of the few subjects I feel i can give accurate and helpful advice. Hopefully I can contribute to the OP in the near future. Subscribed :D

I used to have a similar problem. Went from practicing in the afternoon after school everyday to practicing at 6am when I moved from high school to college cross country. Never thought I'd be able to get a good workout when I was half asleep but I've found running in the morning is especially rewarding during the summer because it's much cooler and I can normally push myself much farther.

when i was training for my first marathon i ended up doing a lot of runs at 11pm and midnight in the vain hope that it would cool down if i let it get late enough.

id probably consider myself intermediate or so on a scale of how serious a runner i am. i started running competitively in high school (on cross country, indoor and outdoor teams), slacked off through college (wasnt on the team), and then a couple years after i graduated from college picked it up again. high points for me were the new york city and new york state cross country championships in high school, the penn relays, and my first marathon (philly) back in 2006. recently ive started slacking again, but i have a friend who is planning to run a marathon this fall and ill probably run with him to keep him company and help him with his training.
Deadly Cyclone
Pride of Iowa State
(07-05-2011, 06:10 PM)
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Anyone have any suggestions for someone that hates running?

I have made myself go out and run a mile each week for a few weeks now, and I know I may be able to run a bit more (not in great shape) but I just end up quitting at a mile because I dislike it so much.
J Tourettes
Banned
(07-05-2011, 06:14 PM)
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I've done a few half marathons but have never trained properly for one yet. I keep meaning to just to see the time I can get (always get sub two hours) but would always pick up an injury or two. Changed to Vibram a while back and haven't had an injury since. Haven't signed up for any races yet this year.
Gowans
(07-05-2011, 06:16 PM)
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God that was EMBARASSING

http://www.endomondo.com/workouts/15318122

Only did 2.2 mile in 30mins and must of only ran a quarter of it, my pace is all over the place.

Stitch, tight calf, tiredness.


Oh well at least I'm running, its a start :(

Need to work on my pace, try to push through stopping and just keep going.
Neuromancer
The Mayuh of f'n Bawston
(07-05-2011, 06:19 PM)
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Just got back from my first run (listening to the podcast and following its 1 minute run/jog-3 minute walk schedule). I liked the soothing British female voice and the music selection was pretty decent. Hot as hell out there (Baltimore) and in fact even now after a cold shower I still feel quite warm, but it feels good anyway.

Tomorrow I'm going to do some weights and crunches I guess, and do the podcast routine again Thursday.

Don't feel too bad Gowans, my legs are extremely tight as well.
captscience
Member
(07-05-2011, 06:21 PM)
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My favorite running tip, the post run shake.

Peel and chop up a bunch of ripe bananas.
Put bananas in ziplock bag and deposit in freezer.
After your run, dump some bananas in a blender, add a teaspoon of peanut butter and just enough milk to get your blender moving.
Blitz.

The result is a delicious icy concoction that almost has the texture of soft serve. You get healthy carbs and protein to aid in recovery. I have one of these after every long run. The thought of having one of these has literally been my motivation to get through some hot runs.
captscience
Member
(07-05-2011, 06:25 PM)
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Originally Posted by Deadly Cyclone

Anyone have any suggestions for someone that hates running?

I have made myself go out and run a mile each week for a few weeks now, and I know I may be able to run a bit more (not in great shape) but I just end up quitting at a mile because I dislike it so much.

Push past the mile mark. I love running and go reasonably long distances at decent paces, and I still feel like crap and often want to quit a mile in.

Your body is designed to a degree to resist exercise and store fat. Get past the initial barrier of your body screaming at you and you'll settle into a rhythm and find that you can go a lot further than you thought possible.
Gowans
(07-05-2011, 06:29 PM)
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Originally Posted by Neuromancer

Just got back from my first run (listening to the podcast and following its 1 minute run/jog-3 minute walk schedule). I liked the soothing British female voice and the music selection was pretty decent. Hot as hell out there (Baltimore) and in fact even now after a cold shower I still feel quite warm, but it feels good anyway.

Tomorrow I'm going to do some weights and crunches I guess, and do the podcast routine again Thursday.

Don't feel too bad Gowans, my legs are extremely tight as well.

Thanks,

yeah I thought I would run more on that first run now listening to the podcast but my own songs, didn't work at all.

On Thurs gona listen to the first one and do it to the letter, hopefully with much better results.

This is gona be a tough couple of months.
Bradlums
Member
(07-05-2011, 06:30 PM)
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Originally Posted by arglebargle

recently ive started slacking again, but i have a friend who is planning to run a marathon this fall and ill probably run with him to keep him company and help him with his training.

who knows, maybe helping your friend train will get you back into it more seriously :D

Originally Posted by Deadly Cyclone

Anyone have any suggestions for someone that hates running?

I have made myself go out and run a mile each week for a few weeks now, and I know I may be able to run a bit more (not in great shape) but I just end up quitting at a mile because I dislike it so much.

Well it's kind of difficult to get over that initial "hump" where running finally becomes enjoyable, but I believe anyone can get there. One of my friends who was pretty out of shape a few months ago started going for mile runs around his neighborhood at night, ironically not for the health benefits, but to get higher from smoking weed while he was exhausted lol. I started going for runs with him at his pace and showing him proper running technique and stretches. As he got more in shape he started going farther and faster and frequently texted me about his most recent running accomplishments. He went from running to get higher off of weed, to running to get a runners high. Makes me glad to see a friend finding enjoyment out of one of my favorite hobbies. Now I've got a running buddy which is always nice.

I guess what I'm trying to say is that if you can find someone to go on runs with you, whether it's someone who's in better shape and goes at your pace, or it's someone at your level, or someone who's slower that you can help encourage, you won't pay as much attention to how much you dislike running and will be distracted from the discomfort by your friend. Plus misery loves company lol. Eventually, you'll probably enjoy running to the point where you don't feel it's necessary to have a training buddy. My friend I previously mentioned runs all the time without me now and I'm pretty sure he's hooked.
Deadly Cyclone
Pride of Iowa State
(07-05-2011, 06:30 PM)
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Originally Posted by captscience

Push past the mile mark. I love running and go reasonably long distances at decent paces, and I still feel like crap and often want to quit a mile in.

Your body is designed to a degree to resist exercise and store fat. Get past the initial barrier of your body screaming at you and you'll settle into a rhythm and find that you can go a lot further than you thought possible.

Hmm, good advice.

I think I'll try out this program with you all and see how I do. I like how it builds up and combos running/walking. I think my issue is I always try to run too much right away and end up hating it.

I'll sign up for this site and see how it goes.

I can't get the podcast yet (at work) anyone have their official website?
Gowans
(07-05-2011, 06:31 PM)
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Originally Posted by Deadly Cyclone

I can't get the podcast yet (at work) anyone have their official website?

http://talk.nhs.uk/blogs/couchto5k/default.aspx
satriales
Member
(07-05-2011, 06:41 PM)
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Originally Posted by Gowans007

I've signed up to run a half marathon on the 18th of Sept. Not long and I'm starting training tonight. I used to box & play rugby but after having a kid and mrs and job my fitness has dropped to zero so this is gona be a tough one.

I've got my gear, shoes and went for a practice jog/walk/jog last night and nearly threw out my knee so this is gona be fun.

I'm in a similar situation. I've got a half marathon on Sept 11th, and then a full marathon next April (Brighton, and possibly also London if I get in).

I used to be a great runner about 7 years ago, I could just run forever and never get tired, but I've not done much sport since then and so when I started training a few weeks ago I was only able to manage about 2 miles of non-stop running (to be fair it was very hilly). I've had to move house recently and so not done much running these last couple of weeks but i'm just about to get back into it and see if I can improve my stamina.

One thing I bought which I'm very happy with is a running watch (Garmin Forerunner 305). I mainly got it so that I can easily see exactly how far I've run and it also tells you your current speed and if you run the same route it can show you how far ahead or behind your previous run you are. Really useful.
arglebargle
Member
(07-05-2011, 07:24 PM)
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Originally Posted by Bradlums

who knows, maybe helping your friend train will get you back into it more seriously :D

im sorta hoping for that. i noticed when i dont have a specific race or something in mind; a goal if you will, i lose dedication pretty severely.

another website i like a lot is map my run. i dont know how it compares to endomondo, but ive been using it for a couple of years.

http://www.mapmyrun.com/
Bradlums
Member
(07-05-2011, 07:29 PM)
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Originally Posted by arglebargle

im sorta hoping for that. i noticed when i dont have a specific race or something in mind; a goal if you will, i lose dedication pretty severely.

another website i like a lot is map my run. i dont know how it compares to endomondo, but ive been using it for a couple of years.

http://www.mapmyrun.com/

My coach just emailed our team, telling us to use a website called runkeeper.com. It's kind of like facebook for runners. Combines mapmyrun with social aspects, such as runners in your surrounding area. It keeps track of your mileage, routes, calories burned and a bunch of other cool stuff. We should get a GAF team going :D

Here's a link to a profile I just made. http://runkeeper.com/user/BradleyTrimble/profile. Feel free to add me.

Edit: Hey Gowans, I think adding mapmyrun.com and runkeeper.com to the OP would be helpful. I'm not exactly sure how runkeeper works yet, but I think I can make a GAF running team if anybody would like to join.
Last edited by Bradlums; 07-05-2011 at 07:34 PM.
Stet
Banned
(07-05-2011, 07:32 PM)
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I use the Nike+ GPS iPhone app. It's decent for an estimation of the run, but I find the GPS spotty in parts. The regular Nike+ app that includes the dongle I often found would over-estimate my run length, whereas the GPS under-estimates. I'd prefer an under-estimate though.
Deadly Cyclone
Pride of Iowa State
(07-05-2011, 07:36 PM)
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Originally Posted by Bradlums

My coach just emailed our team, telling us to use a website called runkeeper.com. It's kind of like facebook for runners. Combines mapmyrun with social aspects, such as runners in your surrounding area. It keeps track of your mileage, routes, calories burned and a bunch of other cool stuff. We should get a GAF team going :D

Here's a link to a profile I just made. http://runkeeper.com/user/BradleyTrimble/profile. Feel free to add me.

Edit: Hey Gowans, I think adding mapmyrun.com and runkeeper.com to the OP would be helpful. I'm not exactly sure how runkeeper works yet, but I think I can make a GAF running team if anybody would like to join.


Just signed up for this, looks cool. http://runkeeper.com/user/DeadlyCyclone/
Wes
venison crÍpe
(07-05-2011, 07:44 PM)
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Yeah I use runkeeper too. Best free app I've found for my HTC. Must not cave into buying the elite upgrade just yet.
fredrancour
Member
(07-05-2011, 07:48 PM)
Dang I really need to start running again, it's been 2 years since I ran at all. I will start training after I get to the doctor for a sprained ankle that I'm worried might actually be broken since it feels.... abnormal.
jenov4
Member
(07-05-2011, 07:50 PM)
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Good thread. I'm big into endurance events (I have 2x Ironman this year) and have done 28 marathons so far. Boston qualified 4x.. Ask away!
Gowans
(07-05-2011, 07:57 PM)
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If we can find something better than endomondo we could all use that. I think its cool to have a virtual running club with stats.

Anyone tried a bunch and in a position to say the best one?
elrechazado
Member
(07-05-2011, 10:27 PM)
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As for gear, my wife and I have been really happy with our garmin GPS's. Anyone else use one? Nice and lightweight, and tons of info tracked.

on a related note, I'm selling one of them if anyone in the running thread is interested -
http://www.neogaf.com/forum/showpost...postcount=4442 obo
ruxtpin
Member
(07-06-2011, 04:46 AM)
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Just ran my third consecutive Peachtree Road Race in 39:02 - It's a 10k, and I ended up in 346 (out of about 55,000 people) !
Amagon
Member
(07-06-2011, 05:51 AM)
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Where would one find running events around the northern NJ/NYC area? Never done one before and been running for a couple of years now.
Cyan
Red
(07-06-2011, 05:52 AM)
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Originally Posted by Gowans007

If we can find something better than endomondo we could all use that. I think its cool to have a virtual running club with stats.

Anyone tried a bunch and in a position to say the best one?

Well, we had a Nike+ GAF group going for a while, but Nike nerfed their group features.

I still use Nike+ and it works fine for what I want it to do. Wouldn't recommend it for a group.
Kevtones
Member
(07-06-2011, 06:05 AM)
Did 8 miles in 58:24 tonight. Not really going hard but it was on a treadmill which always make runs a little more difficult.

Ideally, I'm trying to get towards a half -> full marathon. Any tips on a running schedule for doing a half>
psychicpsych
Junior Member
(07-06-2011, 07:50 AM)
In the last 3 years, I've done around 7 marathons, 3 70.3 iron-distance races, 1 full iron distance race along with a number of shorter races. My next big race is the Chicago marathon later this year.

Websites that I use include:
www.runnersworld.com - running magazine.
www.halhigdon.com for running schedules.
www.athlinks.com to keep track of all the races I've done.
www.dailymile.com - social media site for athletes.
www.runningintheusa.com - to find out any races nearby.
www.slowtwitch.com - triathlon website.

Gear I use for running include:
I started with a Garmin 305 GPS watch but upgraded to the less bulky Garmin 210 GPS watch.

Various shoes:
Asics Kayanos for road races.
Newton Distance for triathlons.
Solomon XA Comp for trail runs.
Vibram Five Finger KSOs when ever.

Various wicking running shirts and running shorts.
A racing belt to hold my bib number during races.
Body Glide to prevent chaffing in different areas.
Lip balm to prevent chapped lips.
Suntan lotion to prevent sun burns.
Various Energy Gels, Energy Gummy Candy, Salt tablets for nutrition.
Combination of water and Gatorade during the run.
Last edited by psychicpsych; 07-06-2011 at 08:06 AM.
Neuromancer
The Mayuh of f'n Bawston
(07-06-2011, 02:51 PM)
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My legs are quite sore today. =\
jenov4
Member
(07-06-2011, 03:01 PM)
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Originally Posted by elrechazao

As for gear, my wife and I have been really happy with our garmin GPS's. Anyone else use one? Nice and lightweight, and tons of info tracked.

on a related note, I'm selling one of them if anyone in the running thread is interested -
http://www.neogaf.com/forum/showpost...postcount=4442 obo

Yep, I love my Garmin 310XT. Anyone who is remotely serious about running or doing longer distance events should invest in one. The little brother, the 305 is an excellent watch, but the batteries don't last long enough.


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