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Andrew Korenchkin
Member
(10-28-2017, 02:44 AM)
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Fuck that is scary.
Bryan Newman
Member
(10-28-2017, 02:59 AM)
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EverydayBeast
Member
(10-28-2017, 03:16 AM)
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Yeah and all the other hours youíre conjuring up memes to post online. Sounds like horse shit
Night Angel
Member
(10-28-2017, 03:37 AM)
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My mom recently got a CPAP. She no longer falls asleep while watching TV and doesn't snore anymore. Sheee says she has much more energy. She waited years to get one and regrets it. If you think you have sleep apnea, get tested and get a CPAP, it'll improve your sleep which will improve the rest of your day.
Giant Robot
Member
(10-28-2017, 04:05 AM)
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Originally Posted by Vilam

My girlfriend has been pressuring me to go get a sleep test done for awhile now; I snore really badly.

I've been reluctant because I really really don't want to have to wear a mask with a machine attached to it while I sleep. It sounds uncomfortable and incredibly inconvenient. Maybe I'm being a big baby about it.

Anyone have any experiences to share about wearing that thing and how it was adjusting to it when trying to sleep? Would it be uncomfortable for a side sleeper?

Go and get tested for it. The initial take home test may feel uncomfortable at first, but you'll get used to it. You can adjust the headband/nasal mask.

Long term health issues are far more inconvenient than simply using a CPAP machine.
BuddyTheBestPuppy
Member
(10-28-2017, 04:17 AM)
this thread reminded me, I have to order a new mask of amazon. My current one is falling apart :C
AEREC
Member
(10-28-2017, 04:35 AM)
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I had a sleep study done ealrier this year (february) and was found to have moderate sleep apnea with 14 events per hour.

Took me a while to get used to the cpap (3 months) and after using it for 8+ months I dont really notice too much of a difference. I keep using it though.
Croatoan
Member
(10-28-2017, 05:22 AM)
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Originally Posted by AEREC

I had a sleep study done ealrier this year (february) and was found to have moderate sleep apnea with 14 events per hour.

Took me a while to get used to the cpap (3 months) and after using it for 8+ months I dont really notice too much of a difference. I keep using it though.

Did you notice a qol improvement?
G-Bus
Member
(10-28-2017, 05:29 AM)
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Hmm..

I know I have sleep apnea. Not only do a few family members have it and own one of those breathing things, but my wife has been telling me for a few years she has seen me stop breathing only to gasp for air and continue on sleeping like nothing had happened.

Think I'll make that appointment. My curiosity has been peaked, thanks OP.
oneils
Member
(10-28-2017, 05:38 AM)
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Originally Posted by Temeculan3000

You might want to tell him what dying means

but for real, glad you are alright

If youíre not breathing youíre dying. Youíre not dead, but you are in the process of dying.
JSoup
Member
(10-28-2017, 05:40 AM)
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-_- Now you lot too?
Fine, I'll get a damn sleep study done.

((I have similar problems and an aversion to making appointments.))
Oracle Dragon
Member
(10-28-2017, 05:58 AM)
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This changed my life; for years, I thought I could just stay up all hours of the night and get little sleep, and it didn't really effect me. What was really happening was that my normal sleep was so poor quality that I didn't feel any difference between 8 hours of sleep and 3-4.

When I got my CPAP, that all changed. Once I got used to it I work up feeling far better than I ever had. I guess this is what people without apnea feel like after a good nights sleep!

I also found out that sleep apnea really contributes to your chances of stroke and heart disease, so if you have apnea go and get tested and see if a CPAP is for you! Don't cut your life short.

Don't have any worries about the mask. They sell different kinds and shapes to make sure it is comfortable for you.

Things that I learned over time that I had not considered:

+ Go to a specialist to get tested and fitted for the CPAP machine. They give a lot of great advice and can recommend a model and mask that is best suited for you. Don't attempt to just choose one on your own.

+ Go back to your specialist a few times, especially at the beginning. They take all sorts of metrics from the machine (most have a little SD card in them that records everything) and will properly calibrate (and re-calibrate) it for you. The machines settings will change over time.

+ Replacement parts and consumables are *expensive*. Hopefully you have insurance that will cover some or all of them. Things like filters are obvious, but even with good care the mask, hose, etc, will need to be replaced. Doubly so if you use a unit with a humidifier because even with good cleaning eventually bacteria will build up in there.

+ If you travel, get a more portable unit. Mine (Resi-Med) came with a special case it looks like a laptop bag, with lots of compartments for all the different parts. Most airlines/airports won't count it as your carry on or personal item, so you can usually take it worry free. Often though you have to have it scanned separately at security as if it was a laptop or similar. But I can't spend more than a single night without mine or I feel terrible from poor sleep.
Soleil rouge
Member
(10-28-2017, 06:04 AM)
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Originally Posted by Razorback PT

Dying 45 times an hour? That's worse than Dark Souls.

LOL nice one.

I'm glad you're getting it taken care of. The way the doc described it sounds horrifying. I've heard from many people that CPAP machines are indeed life changing. Let us know how awesome your first night of sleep is with the CPAP.
AwesomeMeat
PossumMeat
(10-28-2017, 06:25 AM)
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You are going to have to gitgud. I was like 67 times per hour. Mine are Central apnea where basically the brain just decides it's fine to quit breathing as opposed to the airway collapsing.

Which basically means no matter what I'm pretty much stuck with cpap. No amount of weight loss or anything is going to cure my broken brain.

With that said, you weren't dying 45 times an hour... But left unchecked you eventually would die.

At least you will feel better once you get used to having a headcrab sucked on to your face while you sleep.
Dippindork
Member
(10-28-2017, 06:35 AM)
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I had 59 an hour. The mask is what took me a while to get used to. In the beginning, I'd wake up and rip it off my face because it felt like I was suffocating. Stick with it. Now, I just pass a lot of air out of both ends every morning lol!
Weevilone
Member
(10-28-2017, 08:36 AM)
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Originally Posted by Dippindork

I had 59 an hour. The mask is what took me a while to get used to. In the beginning, I'd wake up and rip it off my face because it felt like I was suffocating. Stick with it. Now, I just pass a lot of air out of both ends every morning lol!

I want to reply to too many of these posts, but this one made me laugh. I have only done it once in 7-8 months, but I worked the mask into a dream. The next morning I was trying to figure out out why my trackers said that I wore it like 3 hours.. Mask was in the corner of the room, and I could vaguely remember waking to throw it.

What people say is true though. If you have this or possibly some other health issue, get it checked out. I had this crap going on, plus I had digestive issues. Turns out both were easy fixes and I just lived with it for so long.
whyman
Member
(10-28-2017, 09:36 AM)

Originally Posted by Croatoan

That is what my pulmonologist told me yesterday when I went in to get the results of my sleep study. I apparently have severe sleep apnea and likely have been living with it for decades and not realizing it.

By looking at how regular my apnea was my doc guesses I haven't really slept in years and my body just got used to it. He said it has gotten noticeable recently because I got married and strted sleeping on my back and working a job that wouldn't let me sleep all day.

This is blowing my mind. Apparently a lot of my health problems, which I had been fighting one at a time, might be caused by this one big thing. I am told by him, and others, that the CPAP I am getting might change my life considerably. I get it next week. If this isn't how I am supposed to feel I wonder what getting a good night's sleep feels like?

Anyone feeling tired after 8 hours of sleep should see your Doctor and get referred to pulmonologist. You might have apnea and not know it, especially if you are single.

I was lucky we caught it before I started getting into the brain damage levels of oxygen loss. I should fully recover thankfully.

What you are describing is so similar to my story. Also had 40+ times an hour. Also got CPAP. I too went to see a doctor as it got worse after marriage and work. Had the CPAP for 3 years now. Still donít feel rested when I wake up but at least Iím not failing to breathe. If you got any questions about using a CPAP ask away!
slit
Member
(10-28-2017, 09:47 AM)
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Sleeping with a CPAP machine all the time seems hard but I guess you get used to it. If I had Apnea I think I'd rather just have the corrective surgery and get it over with.
IISANDERII
Member
(10-28-2017, 07:14 PM)
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Originally Posted by Croatoan

That is what my pulmonologist told me yesterday when I went in to get the results of my sleep study. I apparently have severe sleep apnea and likely have been living with it for decades and not realizing it.

By looking at how regular my apnea was my doc guesses I haven't really slept in years and my body just got used to it. He said it has gotten noticeable recently because I got married and strted sleeping on my back and working a job that wouldn't let me sleep all day.

This is blowing my mind. Apparently a lot of my health problems, which I had been fighting one at a time, might be caused by this one big thing. I am told by him, and others, that the CPAP I am getting might change my life considerably. I get it next week. If this isn't how I am supposed to feel I wonder what getting a good night's sleep feels like?

Anyone feeling tired after 8 hours of sleep should see your Doctor and get referred to pulmonologist. You might have apnea and not know it, especially if you are single.

I was lucky we caught it before I started getting into the brain damage levels of oxygen loss. I should fully recover thankfully.

Clinically dying or...?
golfham
Member
(10-28-2017, 07:23 PM)
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You just stop breathing during sleep, you donít actually die. Although, Iím sure you already know that since you are (hopefully) alive.
graybot
Member
(10-28-2017, 07:49 PM)
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I was also diagnosed with severe sleep apnea just over a year ago.

Mine was somehow over 60 per hour. Following the sleep study a few weeks later, there was a group of us receiving results. We were asked if we would mind if results were shared within the group We all agreed and basically I won. It depressed the hell out of me as I was the youngest in the group.

Started using cpap that night and it changed my life. Iíve also gone onto lose a significant amount of weight
kaister
Member
(10-28-2017, 08:48 PM)
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I don't think I have sleep apnea. But sometimes I'm still tired after waking up so I wonder. I don't think I really snore either.

One of these days, maybe I should try to get a sleep study.
Mexen
Member
(10-28-2017, 09:06 PM)
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So waking up is a miracle after all. LOL

Glad you caught the problem, OP. Incredible story.
nbraun80
Member
(10-28-2017, 09:30 PM)
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I've always kinda wondered if I do have it. I guess what's always stopped me from doing the test is that I'm a fit person with no serious health issues and I don't really snore. But what makes me think I might is I occasionally wake up with headaches, and I can honestly say I've never woken up feeling refreshed, even if I sleep 10 hours on a weekend I still wake up kinda tired. I guess I have always just chalked that up to me not being a morning person, but who knows. Also dad does have it and has a CPAP.
Pyccko
Member
(10-28-2017, 10:04 PM)
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sleep apnea is no joke. it took Ryan Davis from us all too soon
Johnny Cage In The Shower
Member
(10-29-2017, 12:51 AM)
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I am 99% sure I also suffer from Sleep apnea, this thread has been an eye opener.

I can totally check off all the symptoms the OP mentioned. Waking myself up middle of the night from snoring, head aches in the morning. Sleepy during the day. All of it

Some morning I wake up, all red in the face. Feeling swollen, my eyes are red. As if some weakling was slowly strangling me all night. (That can't be good)

I'm going to try to see my family doc this week and try to get an appointment. Also Canadian here. I'll report how long the process would take.
SMOK3Y
Generous Member
(10-29-2017, 01:08 AM)
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Yup i have sleep apnea 49 stop breathing (on average) an hour so can be worse.. but its like $2000 for the CPAP machine, hard when im not working 😐
BuddyTheBestPuppy
Member
(10-29-2017, 01:43 AM)
btw sleep apnea damages your body from head to toe. Brain damage, heart damage, liver damage. It will kill you!! It's hard to detect unless you sleep with a significant other. If you are alone, you might not know you have it
graybot
Member
(10-29-2017, 03:58 AM)
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Originally Posted by BuddyTheBestPuppy

btw sleep apnea damages your body from head to toe. Brain damage, heart damage, liver damage. It will kill you!! It's hard to detect unless you sleep with a significant other. If you are alone, you might not know you have it

This is true. And my wife did say for years she thought Iíd had it

But if I had nobody to notice for me I still would have eventually done something. For the last couple of years befor my diagnosis I was basically a zombie and was incapable of living a normal life due to extreme exhaustion
Weevilone
Member
(10-29-2017, 06:01 AM)
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Originally Posted by SMOK3Y

Yup i have sleep apnea 49 stop breathing (on average) an hour so can be worse.. but its like $2000 for the CPAP machine, hard when im not working 😐

That must be a Cadillac machine! They shouldn't be that much.

One of the strangest experiences for me lately is trying to figure out what to do with the extra hours of daytime. I had gotten so bad that I was in bed a ridiculous amount of time daily, so when the stars line up and I get a string of really good nights, I feel like I've been granted extra hours in the day. I feel like I should go to bed, but I'm not tired.
SMOK3Y
Generous Member
(10-29-2017, 06:53 AM)
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Originally Posted by Weevilone

That must be a Cadillac machine! They shouldn't be that much.

One of the strangest experiences for me lately is trying to figure out what to do with the extra hours of daytime. I had gotten so bad that I was in bed a ridiculous amount of time daily, so when the stars line up and I get a string of really good nights, I feel like I've been granted extra hours in the day. I feel like I should go to bed, but I'm not tired.

Well im in AU it ranges from 1300-2500+ id say cheap ones are second hand
Weevilone
Member
(10-29-2017, 07:38 AM)
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Originally Posted by SMOK3Y

Well im in AU it ranges from 1300-2500+ id say cheap ones are second hand

Ah ok, sorry.. thought you were in the US.

I hope you are able to get a machine soon. Good luck.
Ouija Luigi
Member
(10-29-2017, 07:53 AM)
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Good on you op for catching that, better late than never!

I actually started snoring very loudly recently, and it's bad to the point where my So is starting to lose sleep over it. Funny thing is, I know I used to snore while sleeping on my back but never on the side, now it doesn't matter in which position I sleep. My weight hasn't shifted either. I've also been tired constantly, no matter how much I sleep.

So I went to a doctor about it and while checking the usual suspects he noticed that my tonsils are significantly large. So now I have an appointment to the hospital to check if that might be the cause. Hope it's an easy fix.
iShouldGoPro
Member
(10-29-2017, 08:11 AM)
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Originally Posted by Croatoan

That is what my pulmonologist told me yesterday when I went in to get the results of my sleep study. I apparently have severe sleep apnea and likely have been living with it for decades and not realizing it.

By looking at how regular my apnea was my doc guesses I haven't really slept in years and my body just got used to it. He said it has gotten noticeable recently because I got married and strted sleeping on my back and working a job that wouldn't let me sleep all day.

This is blowing my mind. Apparently a lot of my health problems, which I had been fighting one at a time, might be caused by this one big thing. I am told by him, and others, that the CPAP I am getting might change my life considerably. I get it next week. If this isn't how I am supposed to feel I wonder what getting a good night's sleep feels like?

Anyone feeling tired after 8 hours of sleep should see your Doctor and get referred to pulmonologist. You might have apnea and not know it, especially if you are single.

I was lucky we caught it before I started getting into the brain damage levels of oxygen loss. I should fully recover thankfully.

honestly think i have it too, OP. gonna schedule an appointment with a sleep specialist on Monday.
I'm always tired. always. it affects my school work, concentration, energy, physically I always have raccoon eyes, and I always wake up in the middle of the night abruptly.

So, it's time to see someone about it finally
captainraincoat
Member
(10-29-2017, 08:43 AM)
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i had an AHI of around 45 per hour which is in the severe sleep apnea range and its due to narrow nasal passages....while im jumping through the surgery hoops at the moment i got a cpap machine...best thing ever

no more snoring....no more feeling tired and i have so much energy now

The machine itself is almost silent
if you snore and feel tired you probably also have it... i should of done this 15 years ago
RockAction
Member
(10-29-2017, 11:46 AM)
I got a sleep study done and it registered 38.1 disruptions an hour but they (NHS) said they don't think it's sleep apnea but wanted another study to confirm, I'm finally getting to do another study in November after the first one in March, hopefully something comes out of it because my sleep has been terrible for years and it's only gotten worse.

When they said it wasn't apnea and couldn't help my heart sunk so much, I'd been battling with bad sleep and reading all the various reasons and could see all of the things mentioned in this thread, so I finally decided to go for a sleep study and get the CPAP and solve everything, I only did the study because as others note you can't just buy one. So I was heartbroken when it wasn't apnea but they didn't know what it was.

I did my GPs job for them and asked them to book me in with an ENT, as I felt there had to be a physical problem with my nose if it wasn't apnea (and after going to 5 other doctors who each suggested it could be depression related - which it wasn't as I don't have depression although this ordeal has nearly given my it, ironically) again more months of waiting. Within one minute the ENT doc diagnosed by looking at my nose that the cartilage had bowed to the left said so I'm essentially breathing with 60% capacity which is greatly reduced if I roll over on my side or if I have a cold and get a blocked nose etc. This could be resolved with minor surgery.

I was overjoyed and frustrated. I'd figured out a huge piece of the puzzle, (by myself, and I learned don't take a doctor's word for it, you know your body better than they do, not that I'm some antivaxxer, far from it but if I'd listened to them I'd be on anti depressants and still have poor sleep) and better yet it was physical and could be fixed relatively easily. Unfortunately I have to wait months for that surgery so I'm just stuck with poor sleep in the mean time.

I'm utterly surprised and annoyed that sleep problems aren't given greater measure, it could solve so much. Why wait for me to have heart problems and cost the NHS a fortune in ten years when you could just make it easier for me to have my sleep examined now.

What's really been a struggle is convincing those around me that my tiredness is a chronic problem it's not me being lazy or staying up late or all these other things. It's something I can't fix, my parents thought I deranged going to see so many doctors and not taking their word for it, they finally accepted it when I found out (with second opinion) that it was the cartilage issue. Now of course they're worried about me getting surgery 🙄 and ask if I really need it).

It's affected every aspect of my life, I hate the prospect of rolling the dice when I go to bed; will it be a bad nice's sleep, really bad, no sleep, decent or maybe even the rare good night's sleep? My sleep has been so poor I can recall the three instances over the past ten years I woke up completely refreshed. People think it's a joke but when it happens it's like the sky is clear and I have super hero energy levels. Which really just means I have enough energy to wash my clothes, go to the store to buy food, make dinner, clean the flat and read for hours. All that without having to lie down for an hour in between each task. Amazing, or what other people call normal.
Nosgotham
Junior Member
(10-29-2017, 04:13 PM)
i have a pt that had undiagnosed apnea. i noticed while he was sleeping it appeared that he would stop breathing. i put a pulse ox on his finger to measure his oxygen and every 20 or 30 seconds his oxygen would drop to dangerous levels and he had no idea.

cpap machines work wonders
Fixed2BeBroken
Member
(10-29-2017, 08:49 PM)
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nvm
mckmas8808
Sony is POO
(11-03-2017, 08:19 PM)
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Originally Posted by graybot

I was also diagnosed with severe sleep apnea just over a year ago.

Mine was somehow over 60 per hour. Following the sleep study a few weeks later, there was a group of us receiving results. We were asked if we would mind if results were shared within the group We all agreed and basically I won. It depressed the hell out of me as I was the youngest in the group.

Started using cpap that night and it changed my life. Iíve also gone onto lose a significant amount of weight

What does sleep apana have to do with weight loss?
Turnip Truck
Member
(11-03-2017, 10:21 PM)
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As a 17 year CPAP veteran, I can attest to the benefits. In hindsight I know I had OSA long before I was tested and diagnosed, but it was finally getting married and having my wife hear me stop breathing that led me to go and talk to my doctor about it.

I was feeling better within days of starting CPAP and stopped falling asleep in meetings (well, except maybe during all hands calls when they start blathering about finance and sales...thank goodness for the mute button). Better yet, I stopped feeling fatigued and drowsy when driving which may have been the biggest life saver. Definitely worth the therapy. And like others, I look forward to sleeping with mine on. I fall asleep within minutes and get deep, restful sleep.

I use an APAP or Auto-CPAP, which automatically adjusts the pressure based upon detected apnea events, and records everything on an SD card so your provider can look back at 5 years for compliance and effectiveness.
ptuck874
Member
(11-04-2017, 12:12 AM)
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count me as one fellow gaf, best sleep ever is with cpap (unless napping in recliner that is), use that, feel full of energy after 7 hours of sleep, even if i get the weight off (which will help with the apnea), I will continue to use it, just getting air in you makes you sleep like a baby !!!

oh and for everybody else that has weight induced sleep apnea, be careful and get a1c checked at a doctor checkup. seriously, the apnea was a first sign, blood sugars where getting outta control, but not 100 % bad, 2 years later, my pancreas needed help and have to take diabetic meds, be healthy guys and get checked out!!!!
ptuck874
Member
(11-04-2017, 12:14 AM)
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Originally Posted by mckmas8808

What does sleep apana have to do with weight loss?

more tired you are, the more hungry you are, you think you need to eat more to try and stay awake, its a cycle
ptuck874
Member
(11-04-2017, 12:20 AM)
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Originally Posted by Ouija Luigi

Good on you op for catching that, better late than never!

I actually started snoring very loudly recently, and it's bad to the point where my So is starting to lose sleep over it. Funny thing is, I know I used to snore while sleeping on my back but never on the side, now it doesn't matter in which position I sleep. My weight hasn't shifted either. I've also been tired constantly, no matter how much I sleep.

So I went to a doctor about it and while checking the usual suspects he noticed that my tonsils are significantly large. So now I have an appointment to the hospital to check if that might be the cause. Hope it's an easy fix.

and that is the second major cause of it, that is an easy fix to take them out, but you will be sore for a week or so, if you had major soar throats and infections as a kid, your parents should have gotten them out then....
ptuck874
Member
(11-04-2017, 12:22 AM)
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Originally Posted by SMOK3Y

Yup i have sleep apnea 49 stop breathing (on average) an hour so can be worse.. but its like $2000 for the CPAP machine, hard when im not working 😐

annnnnd you cannot buy one used on ebay :( medical device laws, but if you look on craigslist you might be able to find one cheaper, just have to look up the manual to change settings (easily done) with what your size and air flow calculations should be from your doctor
DustyVonEric
Member
(11-04-2017, 09:13 PM)
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Originally Posted by Croatoan

Wow, that is crazy. Is your throat just oddly shaped or what?

Haha! Nah

It's a combination of being hit real hard in the nose with a baseball when young and having bad allergies, making it difficult to breathe.
t-storm
Member
(11-06-2017, 03:54 AM)
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I thought Iíve always had some degree of sleep apnea since I regularly wake up with headaches or migraines and Iíve heard myself snore while being in between sleep/awake states.

However this weekend I woke up in the middle of the night gasping for air so Iíll be calling my doctor this week to schedule an appointment about this. It was terrifying and like something out of a movie scene.

Sounds like this machine could be a life changer.
Bamelin1
Banned
(11-06-2017, 04:02 AM)
I have a CPAP machine, it changed my QOL drastically. Sleep apnea is no joke, it can wreak havoc on your life.
Croatoan
Member
(11-06-2017, 04:25 AM)
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So I get my CPAP on Tuesday. Will let you know how it goes!
Weevilone
Member
(11-06-2017, 04:34 AM)
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Originally Posted by Croatoan

So I get my CPAP on Tuesday. Will let you know how it goes!

Only 720 more deaths.. good luck!
Croatoan
Member
(11-06-2017, 04:43 AM)
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Originally Posted by Weevilone

Only 720 more deaths.. good luck!

:(

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