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ptown
Member
(11-06-2017, 01:26 PM)
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I've had a blocked, stuffy nose/congestion(?) problem for a long time that makes trying to sleep suck. It seems to be worse at night (but it could just be I'm more aware of it when I need to get to sleep) and it's like trying to breathe through a straw.

It has most likely negatively affected/caused all sorts of problems in my daily life (e.g. mental fogginess/difficulty with comprehension, poorer attention span, poor mood, feeling fatigued/lack of energy, etc.) that for some reason I never connected it to that condition.

Some nights (though rare) I have nightmares where I'm drowning and hoping that I wake up (often gasping for air when I do wake) from them as soon as possible.

I've not yet had any sleep tests done. The only issue is I'm unsure how expensive the costs are to have that done. At one point I was getting allergy shots, but I never completed those. I'm not currently taking any medication and prefer not to need to use them daily/rely on them.

Anyone else here deal with chronic nasal congestion?
Croatoan
Member
(11-06-2017, 04:02 PM)
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Originally Posted by ptown

I've had a blocked, stuffy nose/congestion(?) problem for a long time that makes trying to sleep suck. It seems to be worse at night (but it could just be I'm more aware of it when I need to get to sleep) and it's like trying to breathe through a straw.

It has most likely negatively affected/caused all sorts of problems in my daily life (e.g. mental fogginess/difficulty with comprehension, poorer attention span, poor mood, feeling fatigued/lack of energy, etc.) that for some reason I never connected it to that condition.

Some nights (though rare) I have nightmares where I'm drowning and hoping that I wake up (often gasping for air when I do wake) from them as soon as possible.

I've not yet had any sleep tests done. The only issue is I'm unsure how expensive the costs are to have that done. At one point I was getting allergy shots, but I never completed those. I'm not currently taking any medication and prefer not to need to use them daily/rely on them.

Anyone else here deal with chronic nasal congestion?

My copay for a visit to the pulmonologist was $60, but it will likely depend on where you live and what your insurance is.

Only a pulmonologist can actually tell you if you "might" have apnea. The tests might be completely covered by your insurance. IMO, if you can afford the visit, talking to the specialist is the only way to know for sure. In the US you have to get a referral from a General Practitioner to see a specialist though. So I would ask them when you go in for your next check up.
Weevilone
Member
(11-06-2017, 05:14 PM)
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Originally Posted by Croatoan

My copay for a visit to the pulmonologist was $60, but it will likely depend on where you live and what your insurance is.

Only a pulmonologist can actually tell you if you "might" have apnea. The tests might be completely covered by your insurance. IMO, if you can afford the visit, talking to the specialist is the only way to know for sure. In the US you have to get a referral from a General Practitioner to see a specialist though. So I would ask them when you go in for your next check up.

Interestingly, my dentist had training and equipment to diagnose likelihood. He actually produced a 3D scan of my airway that was more sophisticated than anything the sleep doctors did. It was pretty neat.
Croatoan
Member
(11-06-2017, 05:15 PM)
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Originally Posted by Weevilone

Interestingly, my dentist had training and equipment to diagnose likelihood. He actually produced a 3D scan of my airway that was more sophisticated than anything the sleep doctors did. It was pretty neat.

Wow that is interesting, and cool! Did you get to keep a 3d model?
Holy Order Sol
Member
(11-06-2017, 06:59 PM)
Are sleep apnea and sleep paralysis related or not at all?
Weevilone
Member
(11-06-2017, 07:29 PM)
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Originally Posted by Croatoan

Wow that is interesting, and cool! Did you get to keep a 3d model?

I have just a paper copy that looks 3D-ish, and it is color coded to a legend on the bottom that describes airflow thru that section. It's pretty interesting. I don't think the sleep doctor had ever seen one, but honestly .. he was the doctor that I could quickly get an appt with, if you know what I mean.
Atrus
Member
(11-06-2017, 08:00 PM)

Originally Posted by ptown

I've had a blocked, stuffy nose/congestion(?) problem for a long time that makes trying to sleep suck. It seems to be worse at night (but it could just be I'm more aware of it when I need to get to sleep) and it's like trying to breathe through a straw.

It has most likely negatively affected/caused all sorts of problems in my daily life (e.g. mental fogginess/difficulty with comprehension, poorer attention span, poor mood, feeling fatigued/lack of energy, etc.) that for some reason I never connected it to that condition.

Some nights (though rare) I have nightmares where I'm drowning and hoping that I wake up (often gasping for air when I do wake) from them as soon as possible.

I've not yet had any sleep tests done. The only issue is I'm unsure how expensive the costs are to have that done. At one point I was getting allergy shots, but I never completed those. I'm not currently taking any medication and prefer not to need to use them daily/rely on them.

Anyone else here deal with chronic nasal congestion?

Like plenty of people I only breathe through one nostril at a time. Depending on the internal characteristics of the nose people will experience varying degrees of discomfort or medical issue based on these blockages.

Sometimes there are nasal polyps or perhaps the dangly big beaten the two cavities is too big or been injured in the past.

It's quite possible to have nasal issues in addition to apnea though so seeing an ENT specialist is recommended.

For those who might dislike the cpap, they also make retainers that give you a sling blade like underbite while you sleep. Its somehow not cheaper than a cpap but is more portable, especially if you travel.
Bloodporne
Member
(11-07-2017, 05:13 PM)
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Originally Posted by Razorback PT

Dying 45 times an hour? That's worse than Dark Souls.

Came for a bad Dark Souls joke, was not disappointed
prag16
Member
(11-07-2017, 06:18 PM)
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Originally Posted by oneils

If youíre not breathing youíre dying. Youíre not dead, but you are in the process of dying.

That's a silly way to frame it (as with the OP's doctor).

I can sit here and hold my breath for 30 seconds. In no universe would "I'm dying" be an accurate statement.

No more than all of us are one day closer to death than we were yesterday. We're all dying.
Weevilone
Member
(11-07-2017, 06:49 PM)
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Originally Posted by prag16

That's a silly way to frame it (as with the OP's doctor).

I can sit here and hold my breath for 30 seconds. In no universe would "I'm dying" be an accurate statement.

No more than all of us are one day closer to death than we were yesterday. We're all dying.

The point is that in severe cases your body repeatedly goes into a fight mode with super high pulse and blood pressure as this is happening. I would wake with sore chest muscles like something was compressing my chest all night. When you fight like that all night, it makes sense to frame it that way. It's a panic state to get the breathing started again.

I was starting to get borderline high blood pressure and it went away after the CPAP started.
smoothj
Member
(11-07-2017, 07:06 PM)
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I was falling asleep everywhere and went to the doctor. I was diagnosed with it and given a cpap. Legit changed my life. It was starting to affect my heart and I would wake up with my heart pounding like crazy 2 to 3 times a night. Now I sleep 7-8 hours and feel great when I wake up.

Only shitty part is that I can't sleep without it.
LordOfChaos
Member
(11-07-2017, 07:29 PM)
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Originally Posted by prag16

That's a silly way to frame it (as with the OP's doctor).

I can sit here and hold my breath for 30 seconds. In no universe would "I'm dying" be an accurate statement.

No more than all of us are one day closer to death than we were yesterday. We're all dying.

Clinical death is the medical term for cessation of blood circulation and breathing, the two necessary criteria to sustain human and many other organisms' lives. It occurs when the heart stops beating in a regular rhythm, a condition called cardiac arrest. The term is also sometimes used in resuscitation research.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clinical_death

Medical terms aren't what we use colloquially, but that doesn't make them incorrect. It was in a medical setting. So, no, doctor wasn't wrong.You just don't use medical terms.
prag16
Member
(11-08-2017, 03:51 AM)
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Originally Posted by LordOfChaos

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clinical_death

Medical terms aren't what we use colloquially, but that doesn't make them incorrect. It was in a medical setting. So, no, doctor wasn't wrong.You just don't use medical terms.

Blood stops flowing and your heartbeat goes irregular of you stop breathing for 30 seconds?
Andrew Korenchkin
Member
(11-08-2017, 04:02 AM)
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I have been thinking about getting a sleep study done, and this last two months have proven I need to. My work is suffering like mad, and my ADHD meds are simply not working due to sleepiness and insomnia. Ritalin may actually work then. I hope I can get a CPAP machine.
Croatoan
Member
(11-14-2017, 09:21 PM)
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So I wanted to post the update I promised. I have been using the cpap for almost a week now and I can say that both my wife and I have noticed a big improvement in my attitude and alertness. It hasn't really been "Life altering" yet but I no longer am tired during the day and feel more "With it" if that makes sense.

My libido has gone way up, my wife says I seem much happier and light hearted, and my desire to work out has returned as well.

All that said there have been some weird things too.

Though I wake up alert and rested I kinda feel crappy in the morning sometimes. It might have something to do with having six foot of hose ratcheted to my face or just generally getting used to having a suction cup covering my nose and mouth all night long though. This usually gets better as the morning goes on and I feel great in the afternoon.

I am also yawning A LOT during the day, more than I ever did before, yet I am not tired? I guess it is due to the increased oxygen levels at night?

Lastly I have been getting hungrier, esspecially in the morning. I will wake up starving now, and I hope his is just my metabolism going back to normal and not the start of me gaining weight or anything. I seem to be eating less though, and not going back for seconds. Eating less is actually supposed to happen after you start the CPAP as lack of sleep can cause excessive eating. Something about hormons being out of wack or something.

Supposedly I will continue to see changes for the next 6 months so I will try to check in and let yall know how things progress. Again, I wouldn't say the CPAP has "changed my life" like a lot of people said, but it has made my QOL and enjoyment of each day much better.

Oh, and the wife is super happy :P lol
Whizkid7
Member
(11-14-2017, 10:23 PM)
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Originally Posted by Croatoan

So I wanted to post the update I promised. I have been using the cpap for almost a week now and I can say that both my wife and I have noticed a big improvement in my attitude and alertness. It hasn't really been "Life altering" yet but I no longer am tired during the day and feel more "With it" if that makes sense.

My libido has gone way up, my wife says I seem much happier and light hearted, and my desire to work out has returned as well.

All that said there have been some weird things too.

Though I wake up alert and rested I kinda feel crappy in the morning sometimes. It might have something to do with having six foot of hose ratcheted to my face or just generally getting used to having a suction cup covering my nose and mouth all night long though. This usually gets better as the morning goes on and I feel great in the afternoon.

I am also yawning A LOT during the day, more than I ever did before, yet I am not tired? I guess it is due to the increased oxygen levels at night?

Lastly I have been getting hungrier, esspecially in the morning. I will wake up starving now, and I hope his is just my metabolism going back to normal and not the start of me gaining weight or anything. I seem to be eating less though, and not going back for seconds. Eating less is actually supposed to happen after you start the CPAP as lack of sleep can cause excessive eating. Something about hormons being out of wack or something.

Supposedly I will continue to see changes for the next 6 months so I will try to check in and let yall know how things progress. Again, I wouldn't say the CPAP has "changed my life" like a lot of people said, but it has made my QOL and enjoyment of each day much better.

Oh, and the wife is super happy :P lol

Good for you! Sounds like it's doing it's job.

I just wore some testing device over the weekend so the doctor could get data on how I sleep. Supposed to hear back from them sometime today/tomorrow. My poor girlfriend...she had to deal with max volume, ended up sleeping in another room.
ptuck874
Member
(11-15-2017, 12:23 AM)
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Originally Posted by Croatoan

So I wanted to post the update I promised. I have been using the cpap for almost a week now and I can say that both my wife and I have noticed a big improvement in my attitude and alertness. It hasn't really been "Life altering" yet but I no longer am tired during the day and feel more "With it" if that makes sense.

My libido has gone way up, my wife says I seem much happier and light hearted, and my desire to work out has returned as well.

All that said there have been some weird things too.

Though I wake up alert and rested I kinda feel crappy in the morning sometimes. It might have something to do with having six foot of hose ratcheted to my face or just generally getting used to having a suction cup covering my nose and mouth all night long though. This usually gets better as the morning goes on and I feel great in the afternoon.

I am also yawning A LOT during the day, more than I ever did before, yet I am not tired? I guess it is due to the increased oxygen levels at night?

Lastly I have been getting hungrier, esspecially in the morning. I will wake up starving now, and I hope his is just my metabolism going back to normal and not the start of me gaining weight or anything. I seem to be eating less though, and not going back for seconds. Eating less is actually supposed to happen after you start the CPAP as lack of sleep can cause excessive eating. Something about hormons being out of wack or something.

Supposedly I will continue to see changes for the next 6 months so I will try to check in and let yall know how things progress. Again, I wouldn't say the CPAP has "changed my life" like a lot of people said, but it has made my QOL and enjoyment of each day much better.

Oh, and the wife is super happy :P lol

good job bud, you will get used to the hose and stuff pretty quick, after a month or so, you will be asking yourself how you slept without it
Weevilone
Member
(11-15-2017, 06:42 AM)
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Originally Posted by Croatoan

All that said there have been some weird things too.

Glad to see you are doing well. I find it VERY useful to track my sleep patterns with a smart watch. I'm sure there are several ways it can be done, but I'm using an Apple Watch and a third party app that automatically detects my sleep. It tracks when I fall asleep, when I wake (even if it's for a few minutes during the night), my heart rate, quality of sleep, etc.

It's pretty insightful, as it's revealed that my adjustment to this sorta has me awake in blocks of time at night and I often don't remember. Basically now that I have the CPAP I'm working to clean up sleep habits and make sure I'm not getting 5 hours or whatever.
t-storm
Member
(11-15-2017, 01:27 PM)
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Originally Posted by smoothj

It was starting to affect my heart and I would wake up with my heart pounding like crazy 2 to 3 times a night.

This sounds like me. Iím seeing my doctor this morning to see if I need to be referred to a sleep clinic or how I can go about getting one of these machines.

Were you waking up with headaches as well?
SMOK3Y
Generous Member
(11-15-2017, 04:44 PM)
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Originally Posted by t-storm

This sounds like me. Iím seeing my doctor this morning to see if I need to be referred to a sleep clinic or how I can go about getting one of these machines.

Were you waking up with headaches as well?

Youll have to do sleep clinic ten they send it on then you do anoter night at the settings recommend they will adjust pressure to suit you im still trying to afford to get CPAP

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