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CraigerGamer
Member
(06-28-2015, 01:40 AM)
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-san
Sempei
Sensai
-chan
-kun
Etc
Ect

I'm playing Persona 4 The Golden and I see a whole bunch of honorifics and I really don't know what to think of them. Do some show who is inherently the leader? Are they gender specific? Can one go from a -San to a -kun? Sometimes the honorific seems given out of respect, other times it's almost done to mock the person. I'd love to know more.

I know I could google all this but I thought I would get more subtle and specific answers asking GAF.
Bob Coffee
Member
(06-28-2015, 01:42 AM)
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Ignore them, they have no place in a proper english localisation. Op-kun.
John Kowalski
Banned
(06-28-2015, 01:42 AM)
Sempei means leader.

When Sempei notices you, she calls you kun.

Sempei never notices though. Even when you think she does, she doesn't truly. Sempei has a busy life.
Lehow
Member
(06-28-2015, 01:44 AM)
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Originally Posted by CraigerGamer

-san
Sempei
Sensai
-chan
-kun
Etc
Ect

I'm playing Persona 4 The Golden and I see a whole bunch of honorifics and I really don't know what to think of them. Do some show who is inherently the leader? Are they gender specific? Can one go from a -San to a -kun? Sometimes the honorific seems given out of respect, other times it's almost done to mock the person. I'd love to know more.

I know I could google all this but I thought I would get more subtle and specific answers asking GAF.

san = formal one, kinda like Mr.

Sensei - Master/teacher

chan - really, really close friend(usually female, but sometimes used with males) or referring to a small child

- kun close male friend

senpai - your veteran in an organization/school

kouhai - your junior in an organization/school
hodgy100
Member
(06-28-2015, 01:45 AM)
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I give you all I know
Linkark07
Member
(06-28-2015, 01:45 AM)
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-chan is usually used for kids or for girls.
-kun is for boys.
-san is genderless. It is a formal honorific.

This guide can help you understand more about Japanese honorifics.

And I have never understood why they keep honorifics on the Persona English dubs.
Spaced Harrier
Member
(06-28-2015, 01:45 AM)
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Baja Gaijin, means learned foreigner. A high honour.
pashmilla
Banned
(06-28-2015, 01:45 AM)
Sorry to rain on the joke parade, but for a serious answer...

-san = Mr/Mrs
-senpai = someone in a position of seniority over you (e.g. boss, upperclassman)
sensei - a teacher. also used for doctors and learned people basically.
-chan = a friendly/familiar suffix used usually for girls
-kun = a friendly/familiar suffix used usually for boys
Joyful
Member
(06-28-2015, 01:46 AM)
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they exist to make you feel more japanese

like youre really the senpai

and they my kouhai

feels good
Frozenprince
Banned
(06-28-2015, 01:46 AM)
-San is a common honorific usually used to impart respect towards an equal. It's a neutral honorific so you see it applied to everything and everyone. It's just a general way of being respectful to an acquaintance or a non-close friend. You'll see this one the most.

Senpai is an older classmate.

Sensei is teacher.

-Chan is a term of endearment, usually reserved for school aged kids or young women.

-Kun is a general equivalent for the male side.

-Sama is a respected elder.

The lack of Chi used in this thread disturbs me, bakaGAF.
dan2026
Member
(06-28-2015, 01:47 AM)
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Refer to all you enemies as -chan to really piss them off.
CraigerGamer
Member
(06-28-2015, 01:48 AM)
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Originally Posted by hodgy100

I give you all I know

Now I'm even more confused.
Dynamite Shikoku
Congratulations, you really deserve it!
(06-28-2015, 01:48 AM)
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Junior members should call regular members sempai
Walpurgis
Banned
(06-28-2015, 01:48 AM)
Frozenprince
Banned
(06-28-2015, 01:49 AM)

Originally Posted by Dynamite Shikoku

Junior members should call regular members sempai

I agree with this.

We must teach our wonderful Kouhai the way of the GAF.
dan2026
Member
(06-28-2015, 01:50 AM)
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Also Dio-sama is always referred to as Dio-sama.
John Kowalski
Banned
(06-28-2015, 01:50 AM)

Originally Posted by Dynamite Shikoku

Junior members should call regular members sempai

I wanna be the bancho.
Frozenprince
Banned
(06-28-2015, 01:50 AM)

Originally Posted by John Kowalski

I wanna be the bancho.

Who are the GAF yankii?
ramyeon
Member
(06-28-2015, 01:50 AM)
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Originally Posted by pashmilla

Sorry to rain on the joke parade, but for a serious answer...

-san = Mr/Mrs
-senpai = someone in a position of seniority over you (e.g. boss, upperclassman)
sensei - a teacher. also used for doctors and learned people basically.
-chan = a friendly/familiar suffix used usually for girls
-kun = a friendly/familiar suffix used usually for boys

You don't call your boss Senpai.
MudoSkills
Member
(06-28-2015, 01:50 AM)
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BTW, the correct pronunciation is 's-s-senpai'.
John Kowalski
Banned
(06-28-2015, 01:52 AM)

Originally Posted by Frozenprince

Who are the GAF yankii?

Devo was our own sukeban.
Tyrant Rave
Banned
(06-28-2015, 01:53 AM)

Originally Posted by Spaced Harrier

Baja Gaijin, means learned foreigner. A high honour.

My favorite flavor of Mountain dew is Baka Blast
Frozenprince
Banned
(06-28-2015, 01:53 AM)

Originally Posted by ramyeon

You don't call your boss Senpai.

Well you can if you wanna be fired/creepy.
terrisus
Banned
(06-28-2015, 01:53 AM)

Originally Posted by MudoSkills

BTW, the correct pronunciation is 's-s-senpai'.

Ugu~
Frozenprince
Banned
(06-28-2015, 01:54 AM)

Originally Posted by terrisus

Ugu~

Replicant
There's a duck in the room
There's a duck i-OWWWW
(06-28-2015, 01:54 AM)
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OP-chan kawaii yo!

Senpai, notice me please!
FluxWaveZ
Member
(06-28-2015, 01:55 AM)
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I wonder if people ever have this conversation in Japan about "Mr.", "Miss.", "Mrs." and "Ms."
terrisus
Banned
(06-28-2015, 01:55 AM)

Originally Posted by FluxWaveZ

I wonder if people ever have this conversation in Japan about "Mr.", "Miss.", "Mrs." and "Ms."

People have this conversation in the US about those as well.

P.S. "Miss" doesn't generally have a period after it, despite being a shortened version of "Mistress"
massoluk
Member
(06-28-2015, 01:55 AM)
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Don't you ever use these in actual translation work. Leave their useages to weeb.
sprsk
force push the doodoo rock
(06-28-2015, 01:55 AM)
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Originally Posted by pashmilla

Sorry to rain on the joke parade, but for a serious answer...

-san = Mr/Mrs
-senpai = someone in a position of seniority over you (e.g. boss, upperclassman)
sensei - a teacher. also used for doctors and learned people basically.
-chan = a friendly/familiar suffix used usually for girls
-kun = a friendly/familiar suffix used usually for boys

This is correct. And just to clarify, since a lot of folks seem to miss this one--girls can be called -kun as well (usually in the workplace by people higher in the food chain structurally).

Also i would argue depending on circumstances, you could call a boss a sempai, but usually you dont.
Frozenprince
Banned
(06-28-2015, 01:56 AM)

Originally Posted by FluxWaveZ

I wonder if people ever have this conversation in Japan about "Mr.", "Miss.", "Mrs." and "Ms."

I was called "sir" as an honorific a couple times.

That was neat.
dan2026
Member
(06-28-2015, 01:57 AM)
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'Ore no kami ga nandatte!'

'That gentleman made a disparaging remark about my hairstyle. I will box his ears!'

Learn these OP, it could save your life.
CraigerGamer
Member
(06-28-2015, 01:58 AM)
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So this would be correct?

Chie-San is GOAT. Is the -San capitalized?
MudoSkills
Member
(06-28-2015, 01:59 AM)
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People are going to ignore whether or not you've used the correct honorific and instead turn this into a 'best girl' discussion.

You made this happen.
Walpurgis
Banned
(06-28-2015, 02:00 AM)
Here are some more educational examples on the use of "-chan" and "-sama" OP.

In this scenario, Romney-sama is using the suffix "-chan" on Obama as a way to show his endearment. Obama-chan replies to him using "-sama" as a way to show his respect. From this, we can glean that Romney fills the dominant role in this relationship. As you can see, this is much more deep and complex than English honourifics.
Frozenprince
Banned
(06-28-2015, 02:00 AM)

Originally Posted by CraigerGamer

So this would be correct?

Chie-San is GOAT. Is the -San capitalized?

Yes, honorifics are capitalized. Just like Mr/Mrs

And it's usually Chie-Chan. (well Satonaka-San/Chan but naming conventions and all that).
John Kowalski
Banned
(06-28-2015, 02:00 AM)

Originally Posted by CraigerGamer

So this would be correct?

Chie-San is GOAT. Is the -San capitalized?

No.

Yukiko is.
MudoSkills
Member
(06-28-2015, 02:02 AM)
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Originally Posted by John Kowalski

No.

Yukiko is.

See. I told you.
hodgy100
Member
(06-28-2015, 02:06 AM)
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Originally Posted by CraigerGamer

Now I'm even more confused.

RustedPieces
Banned
(06-28-2015, 02:07 AM)
Japanese Horrorflix
MudoSkills
Member
(06-28-2015, 02:08 AM)
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CraigerGamer
Member
(06-28-2015, 02:09 AM)
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Originally Posted by Frozenprince

Yes, honorifics are capitalized. Just like Mr/Mrs

And it's usually Chie-Chan. (well Satonaka-San/Chan but naming conventions and all that).

Ah. Got it. That would make more sense.
ramyeon
Member
(06-28-2015, 02:12 AM)
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Originally Posted by Frozenprince

Yes, honorifics are capitalized. Just like Mr/Mrs

And it's usually Chie-Chan. (well Satonaka-San/Chan but naming conventions and all that).

I mean it really doesn't matter whether you capitalise Japanese honorifics or not since Japanese doesn't use a roman alphabet to begin with.
terrisus
Banned
(06-28-2015, 02:13 AM)

Originally Posted by Walpurgis

Here are some more educational examples on the use of "-chan" and "-sama" OP.

In this scenario, Romney-sama is using the suffix "-chan" on Obama as a way to show his endearment. Obama-chan replies to him using "-sama" as a way to show his respect. From this, we can glean that Romney fills the dominant role in this relationship. As you can see, this is much more deep and complex than English honourifics.

I've seen plenty of variations on this, but this is probably the most adorable one I've seen.

Also, good job on proper English spelling of "honourifics"
Sai-kun
Banned
(06-28-2015, 02:14 AM)
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Hi :3
hodgy100
Member
(06-28-2015, 02:14 AM)
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Haly
One day I realized that sadness is just another word for not enough coffee.
(06-28-2015, 02:14 AM)
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Senpai sharks? Senpai sharks.


http://fat.gfycat.com/GlossySmallBlacklemur.webm
Darksol
Member
(06-28-2015, 02:17 AM)
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Originally Posted by ramyeon

I mean it really doesn't matter whether you capitalise Japanese honorifics or not since Japanese doesn't use a roman alphabet to begin with.

^ This.

Anyone with enough time to argue the semantics of romanization can probably afford the couple days it'd take to learn the kana :p
terrisus
Banned
(06-28-2015, 02:18 AM)

Originally Posted by Sai-kun

Hi :3

Sai-kun-senpai :3
firehawk12
Subete no aware
(06-28-2015, 02:18 AM)
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What about -nyan?

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