• Register
  • TOS
  • Privacy
  • @NeoGAF

Ripclawe
Banned
(10-09-2010, 09:25 PM)
Ripclawe's Avatar
http://www.theroot.com/buzz/are-blac...bosses-bad-mix

http://atlantapost.com/2010/10/07/ar...oyees-at-odds/

As the black owner of a hair salon with such celebrity clientele as Angela Bassett, Paula Patton, Phylicia Rashad, Diana Ross and others, Daisy Curbeon managed a staff of six hair stylists for more than 10 years. A former runway model, she had worked her way up from sweeping beauty shop floors to styling for the stars. After opening a salon on Manhattan’s posh Park Avenue, she ran into resistance from some of her own black employees, women who “dissed” her largely because of race.

“Because I’m a black boss, they thought they could come in late,” Curbeon said. “If they had some daddy-mama drama, they might not come in at all. You know, a white salon wouldn’t put up with that. But in a black salon, I’d have to deal with it and be sympathetic because I’m a black woman too.”

She added bitterly: “There was too much familiarity and lack of respect because of race. Familiarity breeds contempt. People try to fit in like family, and then it becomes a problem at work.”


Curbeon’s difficulties no doubt were partly due to her informal management style, but her experiences are not unique; they’re just not widely discussed—in public. In truth, many black managers don’t care to see themselves as too lenient on “their own,” so this “race secret” is glossed over among friends. And business school professors are only now scratching their heads, trying to develop theories on how to deal with this peculiar racial dilemma.

The New Power Brokers

The issue is especially pertinent today, though, because a new “black power” is taking shape nationwide, and black leaders are better positioned than ever to make hiring decisions, from the variety store to the boardroom to the corridors of political power. The nation now has 2 million black-owned businesses.

In addition, the nation has tens of thousands of black executives, several hundred black directors of Fortune 500 firms, 650 black mayors, a handful of black governors—and its first black President, a shrewd and savvy operator credited with running the finest campaign ever launched by a candidate for our highest office.

Despite this clout, blacks are suffering disproportionately in the Great Recession. According to September data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, black male unemployment rose from 16.7% to 17.3%, compared to a rate increase of 8.8% to 8.9% for white males. Thus, black male unemployment is 94% higher than the rate for white men. The unemployment rate for black women rose from 12.9% to 13.2%, whereas white women did not see an increase.

African-Americans cannot afford to let insubordination serve as an excuse for not getting hired. Yet, it is a real, though mostly unspoken, concern among black bosses. While black–on-black disrespect on the job is hardly universal, it does occur when black employees use common racial bonds as a pass to excuse under-performance.

Slack performance can mean the difference between success and failure for black-run organizations, from barbershops and banks to charter schools and tech firms. Sabotaging a manager’s effectiveness could prevent a firm from winning new business, hamper overall work quality, or prevent a firm from gaining access to traditional pools of capital—and black-owned firms already face higher hurdles in this area than non-minority firms.

Off The Record, Here’s The Real Deal …

Many black executives won’t even discuss this issue “on the record” for fear of causing friction among employees, or because they’d just as soon keep the company spotlight off a hidden race problem, especially one in which they themselves might be enmeshed. Others are altruistic about their avoidance of this issue, saying that revealing this problem might put a damper on opportunities for blacks to climb the corporate hierarchy.

Off the record, however, these same black bosses and entrepreneurs can easily recall black-on-black impertinence, ranging from backtalk to a “do-it-yourself” demeanor that could be grounds for dismissal.

“An African-American manager asked his black subordinate to schedule travel arrangements,” a nonprofit executive confided. “The employee felt it could have been done by the manager. You could tell from her tone, which was entirely too familiar for the workplace. It’s challenging on the management side because you can’t respond as you would to a family member, and that’s where tension comes in. An African American manager needs to be able to lead in such a way that’s going to cultivate the support and respect he or she needs to get the job done.”

Some black managers are willing to ignore inappropriate acts of “racial familiarity.” “Sometimes we might not want to address it because we want to maintain an appearance of solidarity,” said Nicole R. Giles, acting executive director of the African-American Chamber of Commerce of Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware.

Giles was formerly employed as the only African-American manager at an arts and cultural organization in Philadelphia. While there, she hired the organization’s sole black intern. But Giles’s hire, a recent college graduate, ended up as the only intern who needed basic training in promptness.

“My intern came in late consistently,” Giles said. “As a manager, half the time trying to mentor a young African American, I didn’t want to be too harsh (but) I had to address that before my other colleagues clued into it. You want to protect, but … at the same time you don’t want to seem like you’re giving preferential treatment, or like you’re looking the other way about a basic issue like arriving on time. Sometimes we ought to know better than to take advantage of a situation. I felt annoyed that I even had to have that conversation,” she said. “It goes back to courage, the courage to speak up on behalf of the community and the courage not to self-destruct.”

Disrespect can create office tension you can slice, making it difficult if not impossible to do one’s job. Theoretically, extreme cases could rise to the level of harassment or result in an “adverse employment decision,” which is legal speak for discrimination. But that is rare, and usually the worker is the victim, not the boss.

Is Black-on-Black Discrimination Real?

Does black-on-black discrimination really exist in the workplace? Perhaps, though lawyers are hard-pressed to cite specific cases; and so it’s more a topic of dinner conversation than a courthouse reality. Among friends, some black managers are quick to level charges of black-on-black discrimination, casting aspersions on certain black CEOs who tend to surround themselves with white managers even though thoroughly qualified black executives have come knocking.

Racism is a serious charge, one that has no bearing on the personnel decisions of most black chief executives. But are they all beyond reproach? Are their job pipelines primed for black talent?

Why Hire Black?

The owner of a Philadelphia-based marketing and information technology company, who prefers to remain anonymous, said that as an African-American he is often torn about hiring black workers. “I definitely feel a responsibility to offer a black person an opportunity, just like I got. But many black people take you for granted and might not work as hard as their (white) peers. Some (African-Americans) rely too much on racial connections.

“You’re going to find people, no matter what race, who are not going to live up to their potential, but they should treat working for a black organization the same as working for a non-black organization.”

The entrepreneur, who formerly owned a design firm, periodically discusses hiring strategies with other black business owners, but has serious concerns about job candidates. “I’ve seen a difference in how some African-Americans interview for a job versus non-African-Americans,” he continued. “Some of that is based on (less) education. I try to give them some pointers, but I think that they relax when they should be extremely professional and aggressive.”

He may well be formulating an excuse for not taking a chance on a black worker. But don’t black entrepreneurs have as much right as anyone to entertain doubts about a prospective hire’s ability regardless of race?

Self-Oppression

On the other hand, his doubt may well be traced to what Mary B. McRae, associate professor of applied psychology at New York University’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development, calls “internalized oppression”—the internalization of negative aspects of yourself and other black people.

As she explains it: “You have a sense of self-hate or hate for the group that you are part of and what they represent in society. The (widespread public) lesson has been that black folk are not smart, they’re not capable, and you sort of internalize that. The person does not appreciate his own group, and has a higher appreciation for whites. He idolizes what whites do and demonizes what blacks do.”

This applies not only to how black bosses evaluate the skills of subordinates, but also to how black subordinates rate the skills of black managers. Some black subordinates might view black managers’ abilities as not being on par with their white counterparts’, possibly providing rationale for refusing to do black managers’ bidding. R. Roosevelt Thomas Jr., president and CEO of the American Institute for Managing Diversity, thinks most black-on-black disrespect is attributable to workplace tension.

“This is not just a black-on-black phenomenon,” he said. “I suspect it manifests itself among groups that have been disadvantaged or disenfranchised in the work force. For example, it’s not uncommon to hear of women bosses having a difficult time with women employees. I think it’s the same dynamic.”

Dr. Thomas, who has been recognized by The Wall Street Journal as one of the nation’s top business consultants, added: “You’d be surprised at the tension among black bosses and black subordinates. I’ve heard black employees complain that sometimes your most difficult manager can be a black person, and how they found it surprising that that was the case because they were expecting to get more consideration and more understanding from a black manager.”

Still Playing The Race Card?


In most mainstream organizations, African Americans are expected to leave racial concerns “at the door,” especially as they ascend the corporate structure. “In one setting, an individual went up the ladder and then he tried to champion black employees, and one of his white peers said to him, ‘I thought you had moved beyond that.’ So once he got up to a certain level, it was expected that he would not be playing the race card,” said Dr. Thomas.

This whole area, which has not been well-researched, usually is off-limits as a topic of discussion in mixed-race settings. “Some people say it’s like airing dirty laundry,” he said.

In his opinion, black managers can easily get trapped in a vice, facing problems that can emanate from any level in the corporate hierarchy. “The African-American boss can find him or herself caught between two forces. The people above him and alongside tend to have certain expectations, and those expectations can clash. And when they do clash, that’s when that person in the middle can really feel some pain. I think it’s common for all bosses.

I think this phenomenon is more important when you have an increase in the number of black executives in white organizations more so than black organizations. (Black organizations) can have great tension, but typically it’s not because the boss has escaped ‘the plantation.’ It’s more that they’re just different. … And we tend to not keep in mind the differences that can exist beside race. … The more free we become, the more comfortable we will be to express our differences.”

The CEO of a media company, who also wishes to remain anonymous, said: “If black workers aren’t going to respect their black bosses, then who will—certainly not white workers or executives? And that’s a prescription for failure, whether the company is white-run or black-owned and -operated. We’re not asking for anything extraordinary here. At the end of the day, all we want is the same thing many white managers are already getting—a little respect.”

HiResDes
Member
(10-09-2010, 09:39 PM)
HiResDes's Avatar
Black People as a whole are at odds...This is not news.
mikeybwright
Banned
(10-09-2010, 09:41 PM)
mikeybwright's Avatar
*sigh*
Dreams-Visions
I'm mad as hell but this sandwich is delicious
(10-09-2010, 09:41 PM)
Dreams-Visions's Avatar
no.
~Devil Trigger~
Member
(10-09-2010, 09:42 PM)
~Devil Trigger~'s Avatar
...
TheDrizzlerJ11
Member
(10-09-2010, 09:42 PM)
TheDrizzlerJ11's Avatar

Originally Posted by HiResDes

Black People as a whole are at odds...This is not news.

Read the article.

Fire there ass. The bosses should be offended by other employees thinking they can get away with more just because they're black.
Dresden
on the run
(10-09-2010, 09:43 PM)
Dresden's Avatar
So just fire them.
ClovingWestbrook
Banned
(10-09-2010, 09:43 PM)
ClovingWestbrook's Avatar
So... has OTGAF turned into a race forum?
Lunchbox
Banned
(10-09-2010, 09:44 PM)
Lunchbox's Avatar

Originally Posted by LovingSteam

So... has OTGAF turned into a race forum?

Hey bill, RACE WAR !
notworksafe
Member
(10-09-2010, 09:45 PM)
notworksafe's Avatar
Shocking! Bosses want their employees to do their job.

The CEO of a media company, who also wishes to remain anonymous, said: “If black workers aren’t going to respect their black bosses, then who will—certainly not white workers or executives? And that’s a prescription for failure, whether the company is white-run or black-owned and -operated. We’re not asking for anything extraordinary here. At the end of the day, all we want is the same thing many white managers are already getting—a little respect.”

Not sure why this CEO automatically thinks that their white employees don't respect them. That's a bit odd. Oe perhaps I'm the odd one for showing my boss respect at work, whatever color/sex/etc they are.
MetalAlien
Banned
(10-09-2010, 09:45 PM)

The CEO of a media company, who also wishes to remain anonymous, said: “If black workers aren’t going to respect their black bosses, then who will—certainly not white workers or executives?

Yes because I don't respect any of my supervisors that are black. (rolls eyes) Actually the boss we hate is a white guy, he's an ass and knows it, loves it actually. The Black guy is one of the cool ones.
DY_nasty
#notmine
(10-09-2010, 09:46 PM)
DY_nasty's Avatar
It definitely does count at dirty laundry for a lot of people, but my father is described pretty well in this article. He owned a construction/contracting company for 6 years and almost every time I saw him kick a guy off of a site they'd be black.

It has to do with some backwards idea of thinking that life under a black boss would naturally be easier or something. As if the system would be different under a black-owned establishment than it would be under a white one. I understand why but I really didn't believe it was that big of an issue nationwide. I always thought that 'fire the dumbass' was a working solution regardless of race or sex.
sangreal
Member
(10-09-2010, 09:46 PM)
sangreal's Avatar
I don't think the issue of employees treating their boss like a friend is limited to any minority group (although it is easier for it to be an issue when employee and boss can relate on a personal level -- or the employee thinks they can). Poor managers who don't demand respect from their employees will have problems with subordinates of any race.

My previous boss who was Indian actually made a very similar complaint to me once about hiring other Indian employees.
Last edited by sangreal; 10-09-2010 at 09:49 PM.
Beezy
in the heezy fo sheezy
(10-09-2010, 09:47 PM)
I dunno about the guys, but black females in a position of power are often straight up bitches to their employees. They act like saints when their bosses are around though. I'll do whatever it takes not to work under one again.
DY_nasty
#notmine
(10-09-2010, 09:50 PM)
DY_nasty's Avatar

Originally Posted by sangreal

I don't think the issue of employees treating their boss like a friend is limited to any minority group (although it is easier for it to be an issue when employee and boss can relate on a personal level). Poor managers who don't demand respect from their employees will have problems with subordinates of any race.

It goes back to the whole concept of helping out other blacks... You want to help out (and there's nothing wrong with that), but someone who can't do their job is just someone who can't do their job.

Originally Posted by Beezy

I dunno about the guys, but black females in a position of power are often straight up bitches to their employees. They act like saints when their bosses are around though. I'll do whatever it takes not to work under one again.

I'm not gonna say 'all' black females get like that with a lot of power in a workplace... but damn they make me want to.
Escape Goat
(10-09-2010, 09:50 PM)
My struggles at a black salon simply do not compare to the struggles I've experienced at white salons.
Subitai
Member
(10-09-2010, 10:07 PM)
Subitai's Avatar
I don't know what to type.


I've had black supervisors and worked with their Black subordinates and never saw this, but that was retail. While the assistant store manager was black for awhile, the store manager was a white hispanic, so that might have affected things for my department manger and supervisor. All my supervisors at Boeing were white, can't really say anything in regards to my corporate experience.

However, I do remember in college being a member of a group that was targeted at black/hispanics, but anyone was allowed in and there were a few white officers. And, along the lines of this article, the black officers, obviously elected by members they're trying to lead, had a harder time getting people to attend/attend-on-time meetings, event preparation, and work groups. It wasn't that clear cut, but the organization did have problems and this behavior was definitely part of it. I stayed in and basically ignored it cause of a few of my friends who were very committed, and yes some of them were black.
tokkun
Member
(10-09-2010, 10:10 PM)
tokkun's Avatar
I don't see a whole lot of evidence in this article. It's a bunch of supposition backed by a few anecdotes.
LiveFromKyoto
make it rain, motherfucker
(10-09-2010, 10:14 PM)
LiveFromKyoto's Avatar
Don't worry. I'm sure that in the end black people can deal with this the same way white people do - ruthless sociopathic exploitation of your subordinates. Capitalism, baby! The person with the lowest capacity for human emotion wins!

[IMG]http://i52.************/dc92si.jpg[/IMG]
CrocMother
Member
(10-09-2010, 10:17 PM)
CrocMother's Avatar
Can someone tell me what a "nonprofit executive" is?

It is where they got one of their quotes in the article.
sangreal
Member
(10-09-2010, 10:18 PM)
sangreal's Avatar

Originally Posted by CrocMother

Can someone tell me what a "nonprofit executive" is?

It is where they got one of their quotes in the article.

Someone who is an executive in a non-profit group...
Dreams-Visions
I'm mad as hell but this sandwich is delicious
(10-09-2010, 10:21 PM)
Dreams-Visions's Avatar
the issue is the employees. not because he's black.

low-level / low-education employees are typically slackers. give an inch, they will take a mile. sounds to me like he's being too friendly and too nice...not professional enough...and it's making slacker employees act more slack. happens no matter what color the boss is.
elrechazado
Member
(10-09-2010, 10:22 PM)
elrechazado's Avatar

Originally Posted by LiveFromKyoto

Don't worry. I'm sure that in the end black people can deal with this the same way white people do - ruthless sociopathic exploitation of your subordinates. Capitalism, baby! The person with the lowest capacity for human emotion wins!

[IMG]http://i52.************/dc92si.jpg[/IG]

expecting your employees to come to work on time and not bring personal drama to work is ruthless exploitation.
Haly
One day I realized that sadness is just another word for not enough coffee.
(10-09-2010, 10:31 PM)
Haly's Avatar

the issue is the employees. not because he's black.

It's pretty clear in some of the anecdotes and the article itself that some black employees are trying to treat to their bosses like family or friends, and using those connections as an excuse for poor work performance. Sure it happens in all situations when an employee has an avenue of personal connection with their superiors, but apparently it's common enough among black employer-black employee scenarios to warrant this article.

I don't want to sound presumptuous but isn't there a pretty common theme of camaraderie due to skin color/shared struggles/history in all facets of African American culture? It happens with any group that becomes insular as a result of pressure from external sources.

What I would like to know is if these employers have the same trouble with first generation African immigrants. If so, then you're probably right that it's just lack of education and cupidity on the part of the employee. If not, it may point to some deeper rooted cultural problem.
Last edited by Haly; 10-09-2010 at 10:35 PM.
JGS
Banned
(10-09-2010, 10:34 PM)
JGS's Avatar
I'm sure this has been said already, but start the relationship as employer/employee and you won't have this problem. Treating them like black folk first rather than employees may very well cause an issue/assumption.

This isn't really just a race issue though. People run into this that hire friends, family, church members, young people (They're the worst but I need them dang it), etc...
Door2Dawn
Banned
(10-09-2010, 10:35 PM)
Door2Dawn's Avatar

Originally Posted by Dreams-Visions

the issue is the employees. not because he's black.

low-level / low-education employees are typically slackers. give an inch, they will take a mile. sounds to me like he's being too friendly and too nice...not professional enough...and it's making slacker employees act more slack. happens no matter what color the boss is.

Well thats pretty harsh :lol
loosus
Banned
(10-09-2010, 10:36 PM)

Originally Posted by Beezy

I dunno about the guys, but black females in a position of power are often straight up bitches to their employees. They act like saints when their bosses are around though. I'll do whatever it takes not to work under one again.

Hate to admit it, but yeah...you're kinda right. :\ We provide some college classes to some minimum-security prisoners at a local prison, and there are quite a few black female supervisors there. Needless to say, I'd rather work under a black male, white female, or white male at that prison any day of the week.

I know these all anecdotes, but it seems to ring true quite a bit. :lol
LiveFromKyoto
make it rain, motherfucker
(10-09-2010, 10:36 PM)
LiveFromKyoto's Avatar

Originally Posted by elrechazao

expecting your employees to come to work on time and not bring personal drama to work is ruthless exploitation.

No it's not, don't be silly.
MWS Natural
Blacks Anonymous™
(10-09-2010, 10:37 PM)
MWS Natural's Avatar

Originally Posted by Beezy

I dunno about the guys, but black females in a position of power are often straight up bitches to their employees. They act like saints when their bosses are around though. I'll do whatever it takes not to work under one again.


Oh yes I can co-sign on this one. At a previous job I once missed a big raise even though my numbers were better than everyone else's because she said that because I was black I wasn't good enough to just be better and that I had to "work twice as hard" to get the same recognition as everyone else. That is pretty much true in corporate America but she shouldn't support that as a manager. I always wish I could have recorded that conversation, would have walked my ass right down to HR on that one.
effingvic
Member
(10-09-2010, 10:38 PM)
effingvic's Avatar

Originally Posted by LiveFromKyoto

No it's not, don't be silly.

i think he was being sarcastic
Barrett2
Member
(10-09-2010, 10:38 PM)

Originally Posted by Dreams-Visions

the issue is the employees. not because he's black.

low-level / low-education employees are typically slackers. give an inch, they will take a mile. sounds to me like he's being too friendly and too nice...not professional enough...and it's making slacker employees act more slack. happens no matter what color the boss is.

I bet this is a lot of it. Black managers want to seem cool or 'in-touch,' and the low level employees walk all over them.

Gotta be a hard-ass to get respect from low-level workers, sadly.
LiveFromKyoto
make it rain, motherfucker
(10-09-2010, 10:40 PM)
LiveFromKyoto's Avatar

Originally Posted by effingvic

i think he was being sarcastic

I was missing his point to make the point that he'd missed my point.
elrechazado
Member
(10-09-2010, 10:41 PM)
elrechazado's Avatar

Originally Posted by LiveFromKyoto

I think I was missing his point to make the point that he'd missed my point.

You had a point, other than ranting about exploited workers in a situation where they clearly aren't being exploited?
Bboy AJ
Talks to himself
(10-09-2010, 10:43 PM)
Bboy AJ's Avatar

Originally Posted by lawblob

I bet this is a lot of it. Black managers want to seem cool or 'in-touch,' and the low level employees walk all over them.

Gotta be a hard-ass to get respect from low-level workers, sadly.

Yup. And if a black manager came down on a black subordinate, the black manager sold out, is an oreo, and forgot his roots.
Haly
One day I realized that sadness is just another word for not enough coffee.
(10-09-2010, 10:45 PM)
Haly's Avatar
But that just goes back to the whole "blacks should look out for one another" mentality the article is focused on anyway.
LiveFromKyoto
make it rain, motherfucker
(10-09-2010, 10:47 PM)
LiveFromKyoto's Avatar

Originally Posted by elrechazao

You had a point, other than ranting about exploited workers in a situation where they clearly aren't being exploited?

Wow, somebody is salty today.

Let's review:

1. Black boss has problem with workers.

2. I make joke about how they will learn to deal with this problem by applying screws to employees to quash dissent rather than letting their concerns about helping their community guide their actions.

3. You misread this, missing the future tense, and took it to mean that wanting employees to show up on time is oppressive, mixing up the problem with the (jokingly) proposed solution.
soundscream
ATTN MEN: visually inspect your condom before disposal
(10-09-2010, 10:51 PM)
soundscream's Avatar
Story is Bull Shit.

As a Black Manager who has had all races working under me I can tell you that it this is the result of poor management. You have to separate yourself from your employees your not their friend your there boss, keep that line clear and there will be no problems. If they act insubordinate to you its the managers responsibility to give them corrective action if they dont they will become a doormat for that employee.
JGS
Banned
(10-09-2010, 10:54 PM)
JGS's Avatar

Originally Posted by Bboy AJ

Yup. And if a black manager came down on a black subordinate, the black manager sold out, is an oreo, and forgot his roots.

That's a good point. I probably started out like that but in the end realized that it felt better to be THE BOSS. Respect is better than friendship at work, plus it keeps you employed.

My white boss always says don't ever do anything that saves someone else's job at the expense of your own (He's full of "Duh" gems like this!). Managers lose their job all the time because of the crappy work of their subordinates that they let happen.
elrechazado
Member
(10-09-2010, 10:56 PM)
elrechazado's Avatar

Originally Posted by LiveFromKyoto

Wow, somebody is salty today.

Let's review:

1. Black boss has problem with workers.

2. I make joke about how they will learn to deal with this problem by applying screws to employees to quash dissent rather than letting their concerns about helping their community guide their actions.

3. You misread this, missing the future tense, and took it to mean that wanting employees to show up on time is oppressive, mixing up the problem with the (jokingly) proposed solution.

I guess I was confused, as jokes traditionally contain an element of humor. Was yours some new kind?
LiveFromKyoto
make it rain, motherfucker
(10-09-2010, 10:59 PM)
LiveFromKyoto's Avatar

Originally Posted by elrechazao

I guess I was confused, as jokes traditionally contain an element of humor. Was yours some new kind?

I'm just gonna back out of this thread now. Nobody else antagonize him, he's got laser eyes.
The Faceless Master
(10-09-2010, 10:59 PM)
The Faceless Master's Avatar

Originally Posted by Bboy AJ

Yup. And if a black manager came down on a black subordinate, the black manager sold out, is an oreo, and forgot his roots.

yep, i was about to say this. i've heard all about it... from the subordinate's point of view, and even told them they shouldn't have done that and they wouldn't have done it if their boss wasn't black, and the response was "well, he IS black and he IS a fucking sellout, white people get away with it their white bosses" etc...

Originally Posted by soundscream

Story is Bull Shit.

As a Black Manager who has had all races working under me I can tell you that it this is the result of poor management. You have to separate yourself from your employees your not their friend your there boss, keep that line clear and there will be no problems. If they act insubordinate to you its the managers responsibility to give them corrective action if they dont they will become a doormat for that employee.

so, you're a sellout?

not really, but that's probably what my friend who i had the discussion with would say!
Rorschach
Quis custodiet ipsos Batman?
(10-09-2010, 11:02 PM)
Rorschach's Avatar

Originally Posted by LovingSteam

So... has OTGAF turned into a race forum?

WHITE PEOPLE
Nemo
Will Eat Your Children
(10-09-2010, 11:05 PM)
Nemo's Avatar

Originally Posted by soundscream

Story is Bull Shit.

As a Black Manager who has had all races working under me I can tell you that it this is the result of poor management. You have to separate yourself from your employees your not their friend your there boss, keep that line clear and there will be no problems. If they act insubordinate to you its the managers responsibility to give them corrective action if they dont they will become a doormat for that employee.

Yeah. This story sounds like one of those "don't hire friend" things.

Don't hire your friends tho

Seriously, don't hire them.
Jerk
Banned
(10-09-2010, 11:10 PM)
Jerk's Avatar
I call bullshit.

Fire their lazy asses + do not fraternize with your employees = No issue.

Also, more studies and less anecdotes.
Stinkles
sober, clothed, willing
(10-09-2010, 11:10 PM)
Stinkles's Avatar
Please don't be black, please don't be black...

Anyway the story has an agenda of sorts and is putting extremes under the microscope and presenting them as norms. Elements of this happen within fiefdoms that aren't race related - language, class, school affiliation, neighborhood. It's a normal part of how people group and subgroup themselves and it's far from exclusive to black people and frankly in my experience it is the exception to the rule.
Baby Milo
Member
(10-09-2010, 11:12 PM)
Baby Milo's Avatar

Originally Posted by OuterWorldVoice

Anyway the story has an agenda of sorts and is putting extremes under the microscope and presenting them as norms. Elements of this happen within fiefdoms that aren't race related - language, class, school affiliation, neighborhood. It's a normal part of how people group and subgroup themselves and it's far from exclusive to black people and frankly in my experience it is the exception to the rule.

yup it just sounds like bad management to me
shintoki
sparkle this bitch
(10-09-2010, 11:18 PM)
shintoki's Avatar
Sounds like she gave them an inch, and they took her for a mile. Add in, I don't want to can them because they are black like me. Conclusion, sounds like it is her own damn fault it happened.

You can be friends with your employees, but you have to call them out on their bullshit. It's no different than your buddy who keeps going after the wrong type of girls. Got to tell them, and if they don't want to change. Then all you can do is cut the ties.
Brannon
Ladies! On my signal,
unleash boobs.
(10-09-2010, 11:32 PM)
Brannon's Avatar
Seriously, doesn't matter the race, if you're a top-tier manager, THE BUCK STOPS HERE. Be friendly all you want, until it starts costing money.

Then you got problems.
JDSN
You must walk home naked, dragging behind you the Stone of Shame.
(10-09-2010, 11:42 PM)
JDSN's Avatar
Just tell your black employee that you are preparing him to take your place eventually, which would be a lie since otherwise id be a shitty demoman.
Last edited by JDSN; 10-09-2010 at 11:48 PM.
Aselith
Member
(10-09-2010, 11:46 PM)
Aselith's Avatar

Originally Posted by shintoki

It's no different than your buddy who keeps going after the wrong type of girls. Got to tell them, and if they don't want to change. Then all you can do is cut the ties.

You would stop being friends with someone because of the girls he dates? What kind of girls are these? :lol Please don't say white girls

Thread Tools