• Register
  • TOS
  • Privacy
  • @NeoGAF

TheRagnCajun
(06-03-2011, 06:27 PM)
^I agree with most of what you say, especially the hype of advanced protien supplements. Personally I buy the cheapest stuff I can that tastes ok and doesn't make me nautious.

I think its important to have a base line, a 'control' that you can refer back to when deciding if a supplement is making a difference or not. If you're always on something you won't know the difference.
DiddyBop
Member
(06-03-2011, 06:47 PM)
DiddyBop's Avatar
Parchment has some good information there but nutrient timing is one of the things I disagree with. I used to be one of those guys that rushed to drink my protein shake immediately after my workout. That is until I learned that nutrient timing is mostly a myth. Your gains won't be lost if you dot drink a protein shake right after your workout. I read that your body is in an anabolic state up to 24 hours after an intense workout so just eat at your normal schedule. Nothing wrong with taking your protein shake after a good workout but it is not something essential where you need to enter panic mode if you forgot your shake at home.
GashPrex
NeoGaf-Gold™ Member
(06-03-2011, 07:00 PM)
GashPrex's Avatar

Originally Posted by Parch

What's the best type of protein? Whey, meat, or eggs? They all come with a catch, but it's eggs. Here's the egg catch. Raw egg white protein doesn't synthasize properly, so don't drink raw egg and make sure it's fully cooked. No runny eggs, and eat the whole egg. The amount of cholesterol in yolk is negligable and is also needed to properly digest the protein. It's OK to supplement with just egg white, but some yolk is needed. Just eat the whole damn egg. Egg protein powder is really expensive, real eggs are cheap. Guess what I recommend.

Just a note on the raw egg whites - if they are pasteurized, then you can eat them raw. In fact its pretty easy to get some added protein to your meals...little expensive. Basically, I have one cup of egg whites in my oatmeal every morning - about 24grams of protein.
X-Frame
Member
(06-03-2011, 07:00 PM)
X-Frame's Avatar
After spending years worrying about all that stuff posted from nutrient timing to supplements, I learned to stop over-analyzing.

Lifting and dieting can be pretty simple if most people stuck to the basics and used common sense. I cringe when I re-read my old bodybuilding.com posts in the Teen section when I was 18. I cared way too much about shit that doesn't matter.

It wasn't until about 2 years later that I abandoned a lot of BS and just lifted heavy, listened to my body, ate a lot of protein and food, slept a lot and did some cardio here and there that I progressed so much.
rando14
Member
(06-03-2011, 07:07 PM)
rando14's Avatar
How much do you guys pay for your egg whites? I remember looking at a quart at the store and it was just outrageously expensive.
DragonKnight
Member
(06-03-2011, 07:09 PM)
DragonKnight's Avatar
Would running and walking 4 miles a day be considered moderate physical activity?
Parch
Member
(06-03-2011, 07:15 PM)
Parch's Avatar
Fair enough. Post workout protein isn't essential, but it really depends on your goals. If you want to build muscle it is. I concur about the anabolic state, but isn't that a reason to feed? Your body will take amino acids from muscle if you don't provide it, and it starts doing that almost immediately after workout. You're not going to die if you don't, but I haven't read or heard any doctor say nutrition timing is a myth. Not surprised to hear it's possible though. It's a big cesspool of conflicting info out there, always has been.

Not everybody is in full bodybuilding mode and that's what is kinda conflicting in these threads. General fitness and weight loss is quite different from bodybuilding and powerlifting.
Parch
Member
(06-03-2011, 07:23 PM)
Parch's Avatar

Originally Posted by rando14

How much do you guys pay for your egg whites? I remember looking at a quart at the store and it was just outrageously expensive.

No kidding. That's why I just stick to real eggs. The false horrors of egg yolk is the real problem, and the benefits of just egg white is overrated. Watching calories is required but there are much worse sources of calories than whole eggs.
GashPrex
NeoGaf-Gold™ Member
(06-03-2011, 07:39 PM)
GashPrex's Avatar

Originally Posted by rando14

How much do you guys pay for your egg whites? I remember looking at a quart at the store and it was just outrageously expensive.

I buy them at walmart for like $3.50 or something - 1 cup a day lasts like 5-6 days. I forget the math, but its something like 2 eggs = 1/4 cup. Sooo by my calculations thats a lot of eggs (40 or so)
nilbog21
Member
(06-03-2011, 07:41 PM)
nilbog21's Avatar

Originally Posted by DragonKnight

Would running and walking 4 miles a day be considered moderate physical activity?

running and walking are vastly different lol......
DragonKnight
Member
(06-03-2011, 07:44 PM)
DragonKnight's Avatar

Originally Posted by nilbog21

running and walking are vastly different lol......

Obviously.

I walk one mile up an incline, then I run to mile on flat ground, finally I walk another mile up another incline. Total is four miles a day.

Just need to know if that is moderate physical activity.
goober
Member
(06-03-2011, 07:45 PM)
goober's Avatar
http://www.choosemyplate.gov/

New well maybe the last couple of days food guide for you nutrition junkies.
Probably not the best guide for bulking, cutting, etc, but a decent guide for those getting into proper fitness.
Natural
Member
(06-03-2011, 08:32 PM)
Natural's Avatar
Finally made the jump to 40kg for dumbbell press today, felt so good. Was going to go to 38kg instead but thought fuck it, best use most of my energy to at least try the 40kg's and managed to bang out 3x8 quite comfortably.

One target down and now onto the next - to deadlift 180kg by the end of the month.
Poindexter
Member
(06-03-2011, 08:43 PM)
Poindexter's Avatar
Everyone is different. Personally, I feel like shit if I don't eat right after my workout. I'm tired and I ache. If I eat, I feel relaxed and rested after a workout.

The most important thing about lifting and nutrition is find out what works for you. Experiment a little. Everyone's routine, life and body is different.
parrotbeak
Member
(06-03-2011, 09:01 PM)
parrotbeak's Avatar
Circumstances will make it difficult to get long gym sessions during the week for the next month. This actually corresponds to me thinking recently that I should do more cardio and maybe give my back and knees a rest from regular lifting. But I don't want to lose too much of my gains.

Been doing SL5x5 for 7 months pretty faithfully, except for occasional purposeful stalling because of my back, mostly on dls and a little bit on squats.

I have access to steep hills so plan on doing hill sprints a lot, and then can do whatever other body weight stuff. Probably will get a long lifting session in on the weekend.

So I'm wondering what kind of sets/reps and % of my current weights I should consider doing on my once a week session. I can fit some lifting in during the week but it'll probably be short (45-60 mins) and irregular.
ipukespiders
Member
(06-03-2011, 09:10 PM)
ipukespiders's Avatar

Originally Posted by goober

http://www.choosemyplate.gov/

New well maybe the last couple of days food guide for you nutrition junkies.
Probably not the best guide for bulking, cutting, etc, but a decent guide for those getting into proper fitness.


Grains aren't good for you (yes, I still indulge in them).
Fats are good for you.

Don't believe the government.
ShaneB
Member
(06-03-2011, 09:23 PM)
ShaneB's Avatar

Originally Posted by ipukespiders

Grains aren't good for you (yes, I still indulge in them).
Fats are good for you.

Don't believe the government.

Care to elaborate on the grains?
goober
Member
(06-03-2011, 09:25 PM)
goober's Avatar

Originally Posted by ipukespiders

Grains aren't good for you (yes, I still indulge in them).
Fats are good for you.

Don't believe the government.

Good fats are good for you. Not all fats.
rando14
Member
(06-03-2011, 09:26 PM)
rando14's Avatar
He's kidding, of course you should eat grains.

But, of course, in reasonable moderation.
parrotbeak
Member
(06-03-2011, 09:28 PM)
parrotbeak's Avatar
I rarely use plates. I put everything into a bowl. Am I eating wrong?
Jason's Ultimatum
Americans out of Mexico! The Border Tax Equity Act
(06-03-2011, 09:32 PM)
Jason's Ultimatum's Avatar

Originally Posted by parrotbeak

I rarely use plates. I put everything into a bowl. Am I eating wrong?

Yes. You're just from Never Never Land.
FallingEdge
Member
(06-03-2011, 09:32 PM)
FallingEdge's Avatar
Cups and bowls all day!
Exclamation-One
Member
(06-03-2011, 09:37 PM)
Exclamation-One's Avatar
Hey Bro-Gaf,

Since I started running, I'm always, always feeling dehydrated the following day, no matter how much water, Gatorade, or other liquidy goodness I'm putting in my body. I avoids soda and I've cut way back on alcohol. When I do drink alcohol, it's always red wine.

I feel like I've lost a ton of poundage, but I'm worried this is all water weight. Thoughts?

Age: 30
Height: 6'1
Weight: ??? Dunno, probably between 170-180 at this point.
Goal: Run an (easy) marathon in Vegas in December.
Current Training Schedule: Running 5 times a week. Average 3-4 miles each day.
Current Training Equipment Available: None, but getting access to a gym soon.
Comments:
Parch
Member
(06-03-2011, 09:47 PM)
Parch's Avatar
Might as well show the whole profile.

•Age: 51
•Height: 6'2"
•Weight: 251 lbs
•Goal: Flexibility and weight management
•Current Training Schedule:
Monday- Chest, Tricep, Abs
Tuesday- Rest
Wednesday- Lower Body
Thursday- Stretching routine or Yoga
Friday- Back, Bicep, Shoulder
Saturday-Rest
Sunday-Cardio
•Current Training Equipment Available: Dumbells, bands, Precor S3.25 home gym, mountain bike, P90X, and Your Shape Kinect
•Comments: Broke the gym habit and do everything at home now because of the Precor machine. Much more convenient and can still do heavy sets. All routines are 1-2 hours but vary in intensity depending on how sore I feel after the last workout. Goals and routines have changed drastically throughout the years. I'm now retired from the military that involved lots of running and circuit training. Used to play rugby, hockey, tennis, squash, softball, golf, and curling. Notice the change in intesity there? Sports are history now because of injuries and reduced mobility so now fitness is just trying to keep everything working. I don't do the entire P90X routine but use some routines for stretching and cardio, mainly the UML Cardio intervals, Core Synergistics, Yoga X, X Stretch, and Cardio X. For additional cardio variety I use the bike or the low impact cardio with the Kinect. More stretching and Yoga has been an essential addition to my routine.

Here's a few tips on aging. Since you buggers are all going to experience it, here's what to look forward to if you don't take care of yourself...

AGE 30. Watch the weight management. Actually it's age 23 that metabolism starts to slow down in males. All the skinny teenagers who are concerned about gaining weight shouldn't freak about it. My recommendation: be patient young padewon. High metabolism makes it very difficult to gain weight during teenage years, but that soon changes. Just because you can pig out and eat as much as you want doesn't mean you should. Don't develop bad eating habits because it can quickly become a problem. Did more sports in my 20's, but had nice muscle gains in my 30's when I started serious weight training.

AGE 40. Injury concerns. I tore a rotator cuff doing flyes and it took almost 2 years to fully recover. Since upper body workouts were very limited, I lost muscle mass that I never regained. Biggest recommendation is to really focus on good form or you risk injury. Be really careful with the lower back and listen to your body. DOMS also became an annoyance. Longer recovery times are inevitable as you age and routines will need to adapt. You just can't do things at the same level you used to.

AGE 50. If you must play contact sports, make sure you use good protective equipment and don't be a psycho. You feel indestructable at age 20 but you pay for it when you reach age 50. Reduced mobility make bodyweight exercises difficult and joint pain can limit heavy sets. At this point just maintaining muscle mass is the challenge for me. But heal with steel, and more stretching and/or yoga can really make workouts easier. Keep working on those hip flexors especially if you sit a lot.

AGE 60. Haven't got that far yet, but I can foresee further mobility problems if my arthritic knees get worse. Your Shape Kinect has "zen" workouts that is Tai Chi, but I'm surprised how difficult these are. Balance isn't something I ever worked on but I can see using this more. I also need to do more one leg exercises. I fully intend to stay healthy forever so routines will continue to adjust as necessary. If something hurts, the worse thing you can do is nothing. Keep moving no matter how old.
parrotbeak
Member
(06-03-2011, 09:51 PM)
parrotbeak's Avatar

Since I started running, I'm always, always feeling dehydrated the following day, no matter how much water, Gatorade, or other liquidy goodness I'm putting in my body. I avoids soda and I've cut way back on alcohol. When I do drink alcohol, it's always red wine.

How long have you been running, how much water do you drink, how much at a time? Are you changing your habits?

I think your body naturally regulates how much water to retain based on your normal habits, so changes to that will alter things. You can drink a whole lot more than usual, but if you piss or sweat it all out you can still end up feeling dehydrated.

I shoot for a gallon or so during the day at work and then after gym I just drink until I'm not thirsty, cuz I don't want to get up during the night to piss.
DragonKnight
Member
(06-03-2011, 09:55 PM)
DragonKnight's Avatar
I'm gonna ask this question again because im' trying to recalculate my BMR.

I do cardio 5X a day which consists of running two miles (about 5-6mph) and walking uphill 2 miles (about 3.5mph). I probably burn 600cals in total this way. Is this considered moderate physical activity?
Exclamation-One
Member
(06-03-2011, 10:08 PM)
Exclamation-One's Avatar

Originally Posted by parrotbeak

How long have you been running, how much water do you drink, how much at a time? Are you changing your habits?

I think your body naturally regulates how much water to retain based on your normal habits, so changes to that will alter things. You can drink a whole lot more than usual, but if you piss or sweat it all out you can still end up feeling dehydrated.

I shoot for a gallon or so during the day at work and then after gym I just drink until I'm not thirsty, cuz I don't want to get up during the night to piss.

This is definitely a change for me, I've only been seriously running for the past month but my friend (personal trainer) says I'm doing great. He wants me to completely cut out the smoking, and just follow his instructions. I probably drink a gallon and a half on average. My diet is very low-carb, so maybe this has something to do with it.
Price Dalton
Member
(06-03-2011, 10:09 PM)
Price Dalton's Avatar

Originally Posted by goober

Good fats are good for you. Not all fats.

Yeah, eat animal fats, dairy fat, olive oil, macadamia oil, coconut oil, palm oil. Eat nuts and seeds.

Avoid vegetable and seed oils.
FallingEdge
Member
(06-03-2011, 10:10 PM)
FallingEdge's Avatar

Originally Posted by Price Dalton

Yeah, eat animal fats, dairy fat, olive oil, macadamia oil, coconut oil, palm oil. Eat nuts and seeds.

Avoid vegetable and seed oils.

Yup! Prolly doesn't need to be said but avoid trans fats as well.
Price Dalton
Member
(06-03-2011, 10:11 PM)
Price Dalton's Avatar

Originally Posted by FallingEdge

Yup! Prolly doesn't need to be said but avoid trans fats as well.

Of course! Well, except for naturally occurring trans-fats in dairy and ruminant fat...
parrotbeak
Member
(06-03-2011, 10:19 PM)
parrotbeak's Avatar

Originally Posted by Exclamation-One

This is definitely a change for me, I've only been seriously running for the past month but my friend (personal trainer) says I'm doing great. He wants me to completely cut out the smoking, and just follow his instructions. I probably drink a gallon and a half on average. My diet is very low-carb, so maybe this has something to do with it.

If it's only been a month, I wouldn't worry about it too much. When I was increasing my cardio and body weight exercies after an injury layoff a couple years ago, I was getting headaches pretty regularly the day after gym. I attributed it to both dehydration and muscle tension in my neck (although could have been other factors like residual opiate withdrawals). Stopped after a few months. Your body will adapt.
ipukespiders
Member
(06-04-2011, 12:13 AM)
ipukespiders's Avatar

Originally Posted by goober

Good fats are good for you. Not all fats.

Yep, I should have specified.
And no, I wasn't kidding about the grains.
MjFrancis
Member
(06-04-2011, 02:25 AM)
MjFrancis's Avatar

Originally Posted by DragonKnight

I'm gonna ask this question again because im' trying to recalculate my BMR.

I do cardio 5X a day which consists of running two miles (about 5-6mph) and walking uphill 2 miles (about 3.5mph). I probably burn 600cals in total this way. Is this considered moderate physical activity?

I would consider this to be moderate physical activity if you meant 5x/week.
Lamel
Member
(06-04-2011, 04:09 AM)
Lamel's Avatar
So GAF this is sort of an unusual post but I need some help. My GF is trying to lose weight/burn fat and she asked me for "Advice". I really have never gone on a diet to do that so I am asking here what kind of diet/exercise should she incorporate into her lifestyle for good results.

Extra info, she gets bored simply by running, so some more interesting exercises will be helpful.

Stats.

Height: 5'9"
Weight: ~150-160 lbs
Goal: ~130
Equipment: Treadmill, dumbbells
rando14
Member
(06-04-2011, 04:14 AM)
rando14's Avatar
Simplified version: lift weights, do HIIT, maintain a high protein diet.
X-Frame
Member
(06-04-2011, 07:08 PM)
X-Frame's Avatar

Originally Posted by Saadster

So GAF this is sort of an unusual post but I need some help. My GF is trying to lose weight/burn fat and she asked me for "Advice". I really have never gone on a diet to do that so I am asking here what kind of diet/exercise should she incorporate into her lifestyle for good results.

Extra info, she gets bored simply by running, so some more interesting exercises will be helpful.

Stats.

Height: 5'9"
Weight: ~150-160 lbs
Goal: ~130
Equipment: Treadmill, dumbbells

Losing weight/burning fat is mostly diet. She can run, walk, whatever to stay motivated, healthy and burn a few calories in the process but the bulk of her attention should be focused on eating better/less.

Higher protein and vegetables, moderate to low carbs, and moderate (good) fats like eggs, olive oil, nuts, etc.
Lamel
Member
(06-04-2011, 07:11 PM)
Lamel's Avatar

Originally Posted by X-Frame

Losing weight/burning fat is mostly diet. She can run, walk, whatever to stay motivated, healthy and burn a few calories in the process but the bulk of her attention should be focused on eating better/less.

Higher protein and vegetables, moderate to low carbs, and moderate (good) fats like eggs, olive oil, nuts, etc.

Originally Posted by rando14

Simplified version: lift weights, do HIIT, maintain a high protein diet.


Thank you both.

I also posted in the weight loss thread to get some opinions.
low-G
Member
(06-04-2011, 07:23 PM)
low-G's Avatar
I have a question. If you work out every day (cardio & basic stuff like pushups and situps) but eat low calories (but not less than 1600 a day), will that harm your metabolism and/or musculature?

My goal is to lose weight, but I wonder how low I can go ideally?

BTW, high protein diet, low carbs.

Basically, can you go below BMR if you work out enough or is that always a bad idea?
Last edited by low-G; 06-04-2011 at 07:40 PM.
Enco
Member
(06-04-2011, 07:36 PM)
Enco's Avatar

Originally Posted by X-Frame

After spending years worrying about all that stuff posted from nutrient timing to supplements, I learned to stop over-analyzing.

Lifting and dieting can be pretty simple if most people stuck to the basics and used common sense. I cringe when I re-read my old bodybuilding.com posts in the Teen section when I was 18. I cared way too much about shit that doesn't matter.

It wasn't until about 2 years later that I abandoned a lot of BS and just lifted heavy, listened to my body, ate a lot of protein and food, slept a lot and did some cardio here and there that I progressed so much.

This.

I'm always amazed by the ridiculous obsession shown by so many people.

The vanity and addiction to 'fine tune' unimportant things is just horrific.

No matter what anyone says, you DON'T need to get a perfect ratio of carbs to proteins to fat. You don't have to calculate everything down to 0.1grams and you won't die if you eat the odd chocolate bar. You also won't burn all your muscle off if you add an extra exercise to a routine (looking at you the 'you cAn n3vr add anything to rippet00es' group).

Exercise should never take over your life that way unless if you want to get into some sort of competition.

Another annoying thing with the workout crowd nowadays is the 'need' for supplements. Want to take protein shakes to supplement your already good diet? Sure. However, when you buy 10 different pill types and 50 special mixtures to drink, you have to take a good look at yourself and evaluate what the hell you're doing.

Wanna gain muscle WHILE losing fat? Sure. Get on a strength routine, don't over/under eat like crazy and do some light cardio.

Wanna lose fat? Do some cardio, eat less overall and limit your junk food intake.

Wanna gain weight? Eat more (keep it clean) and work out. Keep cardio to a minimum.

Click here if you don't know how much you should be eating. You can also check out this. Oh and unless if you're 7' tall and weight 400lb you should not be eating something ridiculous like 6,000 calories a day. Keep it sensible!

Make things simple. Lift heavy, sleep well, eat sensibly and listen to your body. You couldn't have said it better.

/rant over
ipukespiders
Member
(06-04-2011, 07:59 PM)
ipukespiders's Avatar
I actually ran out of whey probably 6 weeks back, haven't gotten around to picking up more - I'll get some eventually for convenience.

I just keep eating lots of good food. Still making gains, had a PB on squats this week.
I do portion control my food, but I don't stress about pre/post workout nutrient timing.
Cooter
Lacks the power of instantaneous movement
(06-05-2011, 12:34 AM)
Cooter's Avatar
There's something about my Sat workouts that leave me feeling better than weekday sessions. I can't quite put my finger on it. It must be because it is the conclusion of the entire week. Also, I think it makes me feel productive on a day that I used to lounge around and do pretty much nothing.

Gym was dead and I did BB curls on the squat rack. Suck it down haters!
X-Frame
Member
(06-05-2011, 12:45 AM)
X-Frame's Avatar

Originally Posted by Enco

This.

I'm always amazed by the ridiculous obsession shown by so many people.

The vanity and addiction to 'fine tune' unimportant things is just horrific.

No matter what anyone says, you DON'T need to get a perfect ratio of carbs to proteins to fat. You don't have to calculate everything down to 0.1grams and you won't die if you eat the odd chocolate bar. You also won't burn all your muscle off if you add an extra exercise to a routine (looking at you the 'you cAn n3vr add anything to rippet00es' group).

Exercise should never take over your life that way unless if you want to get into some sort of competition.

Another annoying thing with the workout crowd nowadays is the 'need' for supplements. Want to take protein shakes to supplement your already good diet? Sure. However, when you buy 10 different pill types and 50 special mixtures to drink, you have to take a good look at yourself and evaluate what the hell you're doing.

Wanna gain muscle WHILE losing fat? Sure. Get on a strength routine, don't over/under eat like crazy and do some light cardio.

Wanna lose fat? Do some cardio, eat less overall and limit your junk food intake.

Wanna gain weight? Eat more (keep it clean) and work out. Keep cardio to a minimum.

Click here if you don't know how much you should be eating. You can also check out this. Oh and unless if you're 7' tall and weight 400lb you should not be eating something ridiculous like 6,000 calories a day. Keep it sensible!

Make things simple. Lift heavy, sleep well, eat sensibly and listen to your body. You couldn't have said it better.

/rant over

Exactly.

If you're 225 pounds at 10% bodyfat and bench/squat/DL'ing 300/400/500 and are getting ready to be competitive in powerlifting or dieting down for a bodybuilding show and need symmetry, weak point training, etc -- then you can analyze the finer things.

But for 99% of people who seek lifting or dieting advice they shouldn't be bothered. They shouldn't waste time with, fill their head with, or consider "advanced" concepts or supplementation until they're doing the bulk "simple" and "easy" of the things required to progress. Eat well. Sleep well. Progressive poundages. Smile in the mirror.

People worrying about what kind of carbs they need post-workout because of some articles or studies so they rush out and buy Waxy Maize or Dextrose powder. What they don't realize is that using high-GI carbs because someone told them to is not all of a sudden going to slap 2" on their arms or chest.

The only areas where I think it would be good for people to seek extra information in is functional anatomy if they're interested, injury prevention, and balancing their training.
reilo
learning some important life lessons from magical Negroes
(06-05-2011, 01:06 AM)
reilo's Avatar
Just got done with a really good workout, but I am having a hell of a time eating this turkey sandwich right now.

And it's not because I overate this morning or anything, but it's all mental personal bullshit that tends to get in my way. When I stress out, my appetite dies down and my metabolism kicks up a notch. I'm certainly trying, and just the act of trying and being in the gym is making me feel better about myself, so I have incentive to keep going. You could say that it's therapeutic.
parrotbeak
Member
(06-05-2011, 01:29 AM)
parrotbeak's Avatar

Originally Posted by Enco

No matter what anyone says, you DON'T need to get a perfect ratio of carbs to proteins to fat. You don't have to calculate everything down to 0.1grams and you won't die if you eat the odd chocolate bar. You also won't burn all your muscle off if you add an extra exercise to a routine (looking at you the 'you cAn n3vr add anything to rippet00es' group).
/rant over

Agree 100%.

The main reason I advocate very basic exercises when people ask in general what they should be doing is because when I was younger, I did all kinds of different exercises, whatever my friends did, whatever I saw online, whatever I thought might help me with anything.

I was telling Francis over pm when he was working on the bodyweight section of the OP, I look at my journals from 6-7 years ago, and I can't tell you what the hell I was doing. I can't tell you if what I did made me stronger in any kinds of numbers, cuz every workout was a dozen different exercises or variations. I can see my thought process in how I laid things out with high intensity stuff and then giving myself a rest with balancing and core exercises. But as far as quantifying any progress, all I can really say is I lost weight. I believe it was mostly fat, but who knows.

I do mostly the basic exercises, but I throw in other shit depending on how I feel. I just don't really keep track of them cuz they aren't planned.

Originally Posted by X-Frame

The only areas where I think it would be good for people to seek extra information in is functional anatomy if they're interested, injury prevention, and balancing their training.

That too. I don't think people can know enough about functional anatomy. Although my memory for that kind of stuff is shit (or maybe because it is), I love reading and re-reading wiki articles on muscles and joints, etc., or re-reading those sections of SS and other books.

I wish I had FitnessGAF 10 years ago. Would have saved me a lot of time and probably injury.

BTW X-Frame, did you end up getting that knee and back program?
X-Frame
Member
(06-05-2011, 01:36 AM)
X-Frame's Avatar

Originally Posted by parrotbeak

That too. I don't think people can know enough about functional anatomy. Although my memory for that kind of stuff is shit (or maybe because it is), I love reading and re-reading wiki articles on muscles and joints, etc., or re-reading those sections of SS and other books.

I wish I had FitnessGAF 10 years ago. Would have saved me a lot of time and probably injury.

BTW X-Frame, did you end up getting that knee and back program?

Ehh, I'm still thinking about it. I have a copy of Mike Robertson's "Assess & Correct" which goes over various assessments and I actually failed about half of them (mostly only by a bit, but failed nonetheless) and a lot has to do with hip mobility, shoulder mobility, etc. And if you fail they give you a bunch of progression drills to correct them.

I also have copies of their Magnificent Mobility (lower back mobility drills) and their Inside/Out (upper body mobility drills) E-books. So I have a decent arsenal of drills and dynamic stretches that I'm doing every day which do seem to help a lot so far.

I might see how things go within a couple weeks. Still trying to get rid of the numbness in my foot that comes and goes which is a priority.

The thing that keeps pulling me back to it is that it's not just a collection of drills on a DVD and an e-book to go with it -- it's a live seminar with 13 hours of content. So he's literally explaining everything.
deadbeef
Member
(06-05-2011, 01:53 AM)
deadbeef's Avatar
Finished week 2 of Smolov. Friday/Saturday (today) was probably the hardest gym session(s) I've ever had. One more week and I can rest. Didnt miss any reps this week. I'm no longer sore in my muscles, even with this volume, but my hips are getting beat to hell.
Rur0ni
Member
(06-05-2011, 01:58 AM)
Rur0ni's Avatar

Originally Posted by Parch

Might as well show the whole profile.

*snip*.

Thanks for your contribution. :)
mr2xxx
Member
(06-05-2011, 02:22 AM)
mr2xxx's Avatar
Does your diet matter as long as you spend more calories than you take in? For example a high fat low carb diet like keto vs. something that is more balanced but in both you take in the same calories and protein.

Reason I'm asking is I'm currently doing a keto diet, lost 8 lbs in 2 weeks but the lack of energy sucks and I want to more of a balanced diet.
rando14
Member
(06-05-2011, 02:35 AM)
rando14's Avatar

Originally Posted by mr2xxx

Does your diet matter as long as you spend more calories than you take in? For example a high fat low carb diet like keto vs. something that is more balanced but in both you take in the same calories and protein.

Reason I'm asking is I'm currently doing a keto diet, lost 8 lbs in 2 weeks but the lack of energy sucks and I want to more of a balanced diet.

At the end of the day, diets are about health. If you feel like your diet is compromising your overall health and feeling, then ease up on it. But your idea seems correct. :)
ipukespiders
Member
(06-05-2011, 04:55 AM)
ipukespiders's Avatar

Originally Posted by mr2xxx

Does your diet matter as long as you spend more calories than you take in? For example a high fat low carb diet like keto vs. something that is more balanced but in both you take in the same calories and protein.

Reason I'm asking is I'm currently doing a keto diet, lost 8 lbs in 2 weeks but the lack of energy sucks and I want to more of a balanced diet.


Diet is more than just calories and carbs/fat/protein ratios. Make sure you are getting sufficient vitamins/minerals in the foods you choose.

Even if you're on low carb, make sure to get some green leafy veggies. Other than that, I don't do keto, so I can't help any more than that.

Good luck.

Thread Tools