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ponpo
( ≖‿≖)
(12-22-2012, 02:04 PM)
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Originally Posted by Zefah

Here's the first part with Miyazaki. I'll work on the rest of the interview a bit later:

4Gamer:
Miyazaki-san, I was very surprised to hear that you won’t be directly involved in the development of Dark Souls II.

Miyazaki:
That’s correct. Shibuya is working as the director for Dark Souls II. He’s worked on the Another Century’s Episode series--most recently R.

4Gamer:
With that being so, what’s going to happen to you?

Miyazaki:
Saying “what’s going to happen” makes it sound like a big deal (laughs). My official title is still “supervisor.”

4Gamer:
With Dark Souls really being your series—having developed Demon’s Souls and Dark Souls—I think a lot of fans are going to feel uneasy about your separating from it.

Miyazaki:
Hmm, I wonder…

Well, either way, I don’t think anyone needs to feel uneasy in that sense. The director—Shibuya—is far more experienced than me as a developer, and he understands the idea and delicate nuance of Dark Souls, so I think it’s OK to trust him.

4Gamer:
Why did you step away from the development of Dark Souls II in the first place?

Miyazaki:
That decision came from the company.

When it comes to Dark Souls, I have a lot of affection towards it and things to gain from it. Being so attached to the title, it would be a lie if I were to say I’m not a bit sad.

4Gamer:
Of course.

Miyazaki:
However, I don’t look negatively at the decision to change directors. While I hesitate to say this myself, I think that Dark Souls, as a game base, has immense potential, and a change in directors will give it a chance to be released from narrow frame or limitations that I imposed upon it. As someone who created the game base of Dark Souls, I would really like to see what that potential is.

At the same time, I’m also working as director on another project, so there’s that.

4Gamer:
Really? That’s some pretty huge news. Is it OK to put that in article?

Miyazaki:
Well, I don’t mind. It would be weird if I said I wasn't working on anything. With that said, we’re not at the point where I can speak to specifics about the project, and this interview is about Dark Souls II, so let’s leave it at that.

4Gamer:
OK. So, going back to Dark Souls II, you said that your title on the project is “supervisor.” What exactly does this role involve?

Miyazaki:
There are two main parts to the role. The first is deciding the more broad direction for Dark Souls II.

4Gamer:
So, kind of like a producer?

Miyazaki:
It’s a little different. In terms of a producer’s job, it’s more like I did only the first part. Frankly, what I did was make decisions about things that would be easier if I just decided them on my own. Things like making sure our budget is enough, and what our development schedule will be like, including testing. When it comes to things that are a bit closer to players, I decided that we should have our own game servers this time, and that we shouldn't sell individual items or weapons as DLC—stuff like that.

4Gamer:
What’s the other main part to your role?

Miyazaki:
It’s overall supervision, although I don’t like how important that makes me sound.

That involves making sure that I convey things like the core game mechanics that I feel should not be taken out of a sequel to Dark Souls, as well as what we (the development team of the previous title) learned from working on the game, and the many points that we felt could be improved. Also, if I feel things are getting a bit off course, I explain the concept again, and ask the team to consider making adjustments. In reality, there have already been a quite a few cases where I've done such things, and depending on the situation, I may need to re-think the boundaries of “supervisor” role.

4Gamer:
So rather than giving direct instructions, you’re in a more indirect role?

Miyazaki:
I don’t intend to interfere more than necessary. I think, in the end, a game should be created under a director’s coherent vision, and you end up getting better results when that happens. I mentioned core game mechanics earlier, and I think there are many elements that can be fixed, improved, or adjusted in that area. When it comes to the feel of the world, the story, and the artwork, all of that is rather subjective, and comes down to individual sense, so I try to keep my mouth shut as much as possible.

As I said before, Shibuya is a very experienced developer with many projects under his belt, and honestly not a whole lot of supervision is required, nor do I think it’s desired.

4Gamer:
However, is there no worry that, when the creator changes, the direction of the game and core elements might deviate?

Miyazaki:
In general, I understand the concern.

However, when it comes to Dark Souls, so many people in the media and so many of our players have given us very passionate and amazing reviews and impressions, as well as criticism and complaints, and the majority of these are all kind of pointing in the same direction. From a creator’s perspective, this makes Dark souls a very fortunate and rare title, indeed.

All of these things will prove to be valuable assets in ensuring that the direction and core elements of Dark Souls II don’t get off track, and with that in mind, I hope everyone will put their trust in the new director and the development team.

So, with that said, I think it would be good for Shibuya to get a chance to talk directly. I don’t want to inconvenience him and his team any more by just saying whatever comes to my mind (laughs).

Originally Posted by Zefah

Sorry for the delay. I had to step out for a while. Here's the middle part of the interview with Shibuya. I'll translate the final part where Miyazaki rejoins the interview a bit later.

4Gamer:
We just spoke with Miyazaki-san about how you came to be the director of Dark Souls II.

Shibuya:
Yes. Thanks for having me here today.

4Gamer:
I heard that you are quite the veteran director within From Software. What have you worked on lately?

Shibuya:
Most recently I led the development of our new graphics engine, and worked on testing out new middleware. Before that I worked as a director on series such as Another Century’s Episode.

4Gamer:
A new graphics engine! Does that mean Dark Souls II will be using it?

Shibuya:
Yes. Separate from Dark Souls II’s development, engine research and development had been ongoing. We knew that, in order to more seriously set our eyes on the global market, we would have to improve our graphics, so the decision to implement a new engine was made.

4Gamer:
The graphics engine from Dark Souls was too old, then?

Shibuya:
That’s not what I meant. We used the same engine for Demon’s Souls and Dark Souls, but we decided to change the feel of the graphics [for Dark Souls II], so what’s why we decided to change the engine.

4Gamer:
I see. And since you came from that background, that’s why you were chosen as the director this time?

Shibuya:
With Dark Souls II, we need to face new technical challenges, so in that sense, perhaps I fit the role since I was working on the new graphics engine.

4Gamer:
In any case, with a new engine, is it safe to assume that the graphics will be greatly improved?

Shibuya:
I think the shading and lighting tech will allow us to create a more natural atmosphere, and we have a lot more expressive capabilities when it comes to the characters and monsters.

4Gamer:
Is the development team the same as that of Dark Souls?

Shibuya:
It would be more accurate to call it a “hybrid team.” Of course some of the team members worked on Dark Souls, but we also brought in a lot of highly capable members.

4Gamer:
I’d like to talk more about Dark Souls II. Is there any connection to the original in terms of the feel of the world?

Shibuya:
It’s not a sequel in terms of story, but that doesn’t mean the feel of the world is completely different. The game is set in the same world as the previous title, but the story takes place in a different location and with different humans (players).

4Gamer:
Might we expect to see some characters returning from the previous game?

Shibuya:
I can’t go into details about that, so I’ll leave it up to your imagination for now.

4Gamer:
Can we expect any changes in direction, such as making the game world a more wide open field?

Shibuya:
In regards to the map, we plan on adhering to the style established in Dark Souls (where the world is split up into areas). We aren’t really considering making it more of an open-world style.

4Gamer:
Miyazaki-san said that he’s leaving the overall concept up to you. Can you talk about the overall direction of the game?

Shibuya:
Dark Souls is a title that already has a very large fan base, so first and foremost, I think it’s important to make sure we don’t let those players down. As such, we don’t plan on changing the framework for Dark Souls II. On the contrary, we are focusing on really highlighting the best parts of the previous game and going in that direction. The concept is to give the game a major upgrade while leaving the good parts of Dark Souls as-is.

4Gamer:
Is there anything you are you focusing on in particular.

Shibuya:
It’s really hard for me to put it into words, but one aspect is the visual scene and atmosphere of each location. I really want to give those things more depth. Above all, what I want to do most is to incorporate a lot of “ideas that utilize the player’s attentiveness.”

4Gamer:
What are some examples of that?

Shibuya:
For example, if the player sees blood flowing towards them, they’ll think “what is this blood?” “Where is it coming from?” Situations like that. I want to create more situations that bring about doubt in the player—make them think “why?”—or give them a sense of foreboding death wherever they go. I want to focus on creating really elaborate environments that may look like nothing special at first, but may contain paths for players who are look closely enough.

4Gamer:
In Demon’s Souls and Dark Souls there were situations where you could see some treasure up ahead, but knew that there was something wrong or dangerous. Do you mean to improve how situations like those are staged?

Shibuya:
By using visuals, movement and sound, I hope to create situations and scenes like that.

4Gamer:
Should I interpret that as “increasing the sense of exploration?” I feel like I may be getting it wrong, so I want to ask.

Shibuya:
It’s a little different. When you say “increase the sense of exploration,” some people may interpret that as “oh, so the map got bigger,” or “the map got more complex, then,” but what I’m talking about is more about the elaborate creation of localized or individual environments and scenes.

4Gamer:
Could you give me an example that makes it easy to imagine?

Shibuya:
Let’s see. For example, say there’s a well. An enemy might jump out of it, or if you take a look inside, you might find treasure. When the player finds a well they’ve never seen before, they’ll stop to take a look at the well and think “I wonder which it will be this time.” That’s the kind of situation I’m imagining. By making the player more aware of the well, I want them to use their imagination and think about it. That’s the kind of thing I really want to work on in Dark Souls II.

4Gamer:
Whenever I hear talk about “intentions to make a blockbuster” or “focusing on the global market,” I usually think that developers are going to steer in the direction of something like God of War or Call of Duty and make really bombastic and straightforward productions, but hearing you talk today, it sounds like the areas you’re focusing on are much more subdued, and, if anything, that’s what makes it sound interesting.

Shibuya:
With games today, you’re really able to express anything you want. That can be a good thing, but it can also spoil the fun of making players think for themselves. We want to continue providing that kind of fun (the fun of imagination), so that’s one of the concepts this time around.

4Gamer:
What about the content volume this time around? Is it going to be increased dramatically?

Shibuya:
We don’t plan on increasing the volume by a large amount from the previous title. It will probably increase somewhat, though. The time it takes to complete the game will probably be about the same as that of the previous title. I plan on spending most of our resources on creating more elaborate scenes and situations as I discussed a moment ago.

4Gamer:
The focus is on quality over quantity, then?

Shibuya:
That’s right. I think part of the allure is the “sense of adventure.” I really want to convey the feeling of advancing one step at a time and groping your way forward.

4Gamer:
You spoke about already having a large fan base, but how are you planning to adjust the difficult in Dark Souls II? To be honest, I can’t help but think that the needs of your existing fans and that of new players might be conflicting.

Shibuya:
Just as you say, it’s a difficult proposition. That’s why we plan on making the early parts of the game comparatively less difficult to ease new players in, and then at a certain point, we’ll tell them “this is where the real game begins.”

4Gamer:
So, a “The real Demon’s Souls starts here.” type of thing?

Shibuya:
Exactly. In reality, I’m sure we’ll get quite a few new players with Dark Souls II, but existing players will probably represent the majority, so we need to make sure we satisfy their needs.

4Gamer:
Speaking of which, Miyazaki-san said that you will run dedicated servers to support the online system for the game. Will multiplayer aspects be a focus in Dark Souls II?

Shibuya:
Yes. At the center we have the gameplay of a strong standalone game, and from there we focus our efforts on adding online elements and multiplayer elements that utilize the dedicated servers.

4Gamer:
In terms of online elements, in previous titles you had the blood stain system, the messaging system, and the concept of “loose connections.” Do you plan to change the direction at all for Dark Souls II?

Shibuya:
We plan to retain those concepts and expand upon them, too.

4Gamer:
I see. Allow me to get off topic for a moment. Is there anything you’re into right now outside of games?

Shibuya:
Recently, I’ve really been enjoying the western drama series called The Walking Dead (laughs). There’s a certain indescribable sorrow to it that I really like…

4Gamer:
Yeah, The Walking Dead is great. I think there’s something about zombie stuff that really stimulates a kind of fundamental emotion in humans. I feel that Dark Souls may also have something in common with that.

Shibuya:
I’m not really paying attention to the survival or action aspects of The Walking Dead. I’m more focused on the transition of the characters’ thoughts and feelings, and how scenes are shown when people get taken. At certain intervals, there are these really tense moments woven into the otherwise ordinary story, and seeing them play out, I can’t help but think “this is really well done.”

4Gamer:
How far have you made it into the show?

Shibuya:
I’ve watched up until the end of Season 2. There are so many heartrending scenes. I’m really enjoying it… Anyway, enough about The Walking Dead.

4Gamer:
Sorry. The reason I asked is that I wanted to know a little bit about what kind of things you think are important when creating something. I feel like a creator’s perspective on things is often reflected in what they make.

Shibuya:
To speak on that point, we had “feeling of loneliness” and “despair” as keywords for Dark Souls, and in the sequel I plan to add “sorrow” (note: “setsunai” is the word used in Japanese that can mean “sorrow,” “sadness,” “heartache,” or even “bittersweet,” etc. depending on the context) as one of the keywords.

4Gamer:
I’m having trouble imagining what you mean.

Shibuya:
For example, the kind of sorrow that is conveyed by the subtle scenery, or the sense of sorrow that that wells up after defeating something… That’s the kind of thing I want to include in the game.

4Gamer:
Are you talking about how to create new experiences or stimulate new emotions?

Shibuya:
That’s right. When playing Dark Souls, one of the experiences was to feel that sense of loneliness or despair.
In Dark Souls II, those aspects will definitely be there, too, but if that’s all we had we wouldn’t be able to create new experiences. That’s why when we create Dark Souls II, it’s our job to figure out what kind of new experiences and emotions we can put into the game.

4Gamer:
In that respect, it’s often said that Demon’s Souls and Dark Souls sold well because of the word-of-mouth it received, but the word-of-mouth surrounding those games was really unique and interesting.

Shibuya:
What do you mean by that?

4Gamer:
How can I say this… The word-of-mouth surrounding Demon’s Souls and Dark Souls was all about each player’s personal experience. For example, where the player died, or where they fell into a trap, or where they gave up… It wasn’t about the story, or whether the game was fun or boring. I feel like everyone was talking directly about their experiences with the game.

Shibuya:
I see. I think that’s actually very important.

4Gamer:
With Dark Souls II, you plan to have a lot of “sorrowful” experiences in the game, then?

Shibuya:
Yes. Also, one other concept of Dark Souls II is that of “time.” (note: the word he’s using—“刻toki”—is probably more accurately described as “a specific moment in time.”)

4Gamer:
Oh. What’s an example of that?

Shibuya:
Umm… (while eyeing the PR representative in the room) it looks like I can’t actually talk about that, so let’s just say that “time” is one of the keywords (laughs).

Originally Posted by Zefah

And the last part. Sorry again for the delay. There isn't much in this part:

4Gamer:
Dark Souls II has become a title with big expectations from players around the world. Do the two of you feel pressured at all?

Shibuya:
I’m very much aware of how big everyone's expectations are, so I need to make sure I don’t let our players down.

Miyazaki:
I also feel strongly that I want to meet everyone’s expectations.
However, since this is my first time playing the role of supervisor, and since I’m not directly involved in the development, there’s a certain frustration there, but I’ll do my best.

4Gamer:
To change the subject again, I wanted to mention that Dark Souls with Artorias of the Abyss Edition won the PlayStation Awards 2012 User’s Choice Award. Congratulations!

Miyazaki:
Thank you. The timing of the game's release must have been right near the end of the voting period, so I was very surprised. It’s always such an honor to win the User’s Choice Award. I’m very thankful for everyone that voted for us.

4Gamer:
How many units did Demon’s Souls and Dark Souls end up selling?

Miyazaki:
I’m not in the position to comment on the sales of Demon’s Souls, but in regards to Dark Souls, I think it's over 1.5 million units at least. I've never been one to focus on sales, though, so these numbers might be somewhat old.

4Gamer:
Hopefully Dark Souls II can go on to perform even better. To close out this interview, is there anything you’d like to say to our readers?

Miyazaki:
First of all, as the director of Dark Souls and as representative of its development team, I’d really like to express our thanks to everyone once more. I really think Dark Souls is a game that was nurtured by its fans, and that’s a big part of the reason why Dark Souls II is now getting so much attention. Thank you all, and please look forward to Dark Souls II.

Shibuya:
The development team and myself are doing our best creating Dark Souls II, so please look forward to the release of the game. 

4Gamer:
Miyazaki-san and Shibuya-san, thank you again for your time today.

Miyazaki &Shibuya:
Thank you.




Member abuse
Thanks for the translation Zefah.

----------------------------------------



http://www.4gamer.net/games/196/G019660/20121222001/

Will put up a translation when available, but you can use google translate to get some idea of what's being said.

For one thing, they confirm the director worked on ACE:R (aka the ACE game no one likes)

宮崎氏:
 はい。「DARK SOULS II」のディレクターは渋谷が担当することになります。これまで主に「Another Century's Episode」シリーズ,直近では「R」を制作していた人間ですね。

Also, here they state that Dark Souls 2 will use a new graphics engine:

渋谷氏:
 直近では,弊社の新しいグラフィックスエンジンの開発指揮であったり,新しいミドルウェアの検証などを行っていました。その前は「Another Century's Episode」シリーズなどでディレクターを務めています。

4Gamer:
 新しいグラフィックスエンジンですか! もしかして「DARK SOULS II」では,その新しいグラフィックスエンジンが実装されているのでしょうか。

渋谷氏:
 はい。「DARK SOULS II」の話とは別に,エンジンの研究開発が進められていて,より本格的に世界市場を視野に入れていこうということからグラフィックスの強化は欠かせないだろうと いう話になり,新しいエンジンの導入することが決まりました。

Mod abuse

Originally Posted by duckroll

Google Translate is still pretty bad. The question was about what Shibuya has been doing lately, before working on Dark Souls 2. He says that after finishing ACE:R, he took charge of leading the development of a new internal engine, as well as middleware licensing. This new engine is also what they'll be using for Dark Souls 2. Even with an internal engine, it is not unusual that modern development requires middleware for various other components. It's just more practical that way.

There are various other details in the interview too, like how Shibuya has been watching Walking Dead lately, and he's a big fan of the survival component in the show, etc.

Last edited by ponpo; 12-23-2012 at 01:17 PM.
test_account
XP-39Cē
(12-22-2012, 02:18 PM)
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A new graphics engine, i guess that means a whole new game engine overall? If so, it will be very interesting to see how it will look and feel compared to Demon's Souls and Dark Souls :)
Gravelord_Nito
Banned
(12-22-2012, 02:18 PM)
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Google Translate actually makes sense for most of the part this time around. The graphic engine its a bit messy but mostly understandable.

QUOTE 1:

Mr. Miyazaki:
Yes. Director of "DARK SOULS II" will be in charge of Shibuya. It is man who has produced "Another Century's Episode" series, mainly "R" in the most recent past.

I'm scared

QUOTE 2:

Mr. Shibuya:
Or the development of a new graphics engine command of our most recently, was doing and verification of new middleware. Has served as a director before, such as "Another Century's Episode" series.

4Gamer:
Is it a new graphics engine! Did you mean in "DARK SOULS II", new graphics engine that Will has been implemented.

Mr. Shibuya:
Yes. It comes to say strengthening the graphics would not be indispensable since apart from the story of "DARK SOULS II", it has been studied and developed engine, which it will with a view to the global market more authentic , it was decided to introduce a new engine.

Sounds to me its not their own engine but something like Unreal, Cryengine etc.
Last edited by Gravelord_Nito; 12-22-2012 at 02:27 PM.
Midou
Member
(12-22-2012, 02:41 PM)
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Another Century's Episode is better than Armored Core, and Miyazaki came from Armored Core as well, therefore, it's going to be better.

flawless logic

Not sure if engine stuff implies existing, it could mean they studied what they needed in a new engine and made it, but we'll see.
ponpo
( ≖‿≖)
(12-22-2012, 02:41 PM)
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Originally Posted by Midou

Another Century's Episode is better than Armored Core, and Miyazaki came from Armored Core as well, therefore, it's going to be better.

flawless logic

I thought everyone hated R, though.
Gravelord_Nito
Banned
(12-22-2012, 02:52 PM)
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Originally Posted by ponpo

I thought everyone hated R, though.

Well from what I've seen most people but you know there will always be 1 or 2 who will like em.
duckroll
mashadar's Nekomimi slave
(12-22-2012, 03:00 PM)
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Originally Posted by Pupi18

Sounds to me its not their own engine but something like Unreal, Cryengine etc.

Google Translate is still pretty bad. The question was about what Shibuya has been doing lately, before working on Dark Souls 2. He says that after finishing ACE:R, he took charge of leading the development of a new internal engine, as well as middleware licensing. This new engine is also what they'll be using for Dark Souls 2. Even with an internal engine, it is not unusual that modern development requires middleware for various other components. It's just more practical that way.

There are various other details in the interview too, like how Shibuya has been watching Walking Dead lately, and he's a big fan of the survival component in the show, etc.
PolishQ
Member
(12-22-2012, 03:07 PM)
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Do we know if Shibuya worked on Dark Souls 1, and in what capacity?
Backfoggen
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(12-22-2012, 03:09 PM)
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I hope they won't loose that tight Demon's Souls/Dark Souls feeling with the new engine.
duckroll
mashadar's Nekomimi slave
(12-22-2012, 03:10 PM)
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Originally Posted by PolishQ

Do we know if Shibuya worked on Dark Souls 1, and in what capacity?

No he didn't. Neither of the 2 new directors on Dark Souls 2 worked on Demon's Souls or Dark Souls. They worked exclusively on the ACE series at From Software before this.
i-Lo
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(12-22-2012, 03:12 PM)
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Wasn't D'S and DS based on Sony's Phyre engine? I take the shift was necessary to base it as a next-gen title.
Gravelord_Nito
Banned
(12-22-2012, 03:19 PM)
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Originally Posted by duckroll

Google Translate is still pretty bad. The question was about what Shibuya has been doing lately, before working on Dark Souls 2. He says that after finishing ACE:R, he took charge of leading the development of a new internal engine, as well as middleware licensing. This new engine is also what they'll be using for Dark Souls 2. Even with an internal engine, it is not unusual that modern development requires middleware for various other components. It's just more practical that way.

There are various other details in the interview too, like how Shibuya has been watching Walking Dead lately, and he's a big fan of the survival component in the show, etc.

Wow thats better O_O
Defuser
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(12-22-2012, 03:27 PM)
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Originally Posted by i-Lo

Wasn't D'S and DS based on Sony's Phyre engine? I take the shift was necessary to base it as a next-gen title.

Probably because Sony hasn't updated PhyreEngine for next gen.

I've some doubts From can pull off a good engine though, they aren't exactly tech wizards.
Technosteve
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(12-22-2012, 03:29 PM)
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ducky tell me it's going to be ok, tell me they are going to cater to there Japanese fans.
Gravelord_Nito
Banned
(12-22-2012, 03:34 PM)
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Originally Posted by Defuser

Probably because Sony hasn't updated PhyreEngine for next gen.

I've some doubts From can pull off a good engine though, they aren't exactly tech wizards.

Depends the budget and time they got working ont he engine and who knows if Namco its helping them with the engine.
ponpo
( ≖‿≖)
(12-22-2012, 05:56 PM)
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Originally Posted by Technosteve

ducky tell me it's going to be ok, tell me they are going to cater to there Japanese fans.

They will. Japanese ACE:R fans ( ≖‿≖)
Orayn
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(12-22-2012, 06:04 PM)
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Originally Posted by Technosteve

ducky tell me it's going to be ok, tell me they are going to cater to there Japanese fans.

What makes you think that they, on average, are much more hardcore than fans elsewhere? I mean, it's not easily quantified, but recall that Demon's Souls got a pretty reserved critical reception in Japan for being so hard, while American and European outlets generally praised it for that.
Foliorum Viridum
Banned
(12-22-2012, 06:08 PM)
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I'm more worried about a new engine than anything related to tone/difficulty/accessibility etc.

At least a PC version should mean a great framerate day 1, with or without Durante.
duckroll
mashadar's Nekomimi slave
(12-22-2012, 06:16 PM)
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Originally Posted by Orayn

What makes you think that they, on average, are much more hardcore than fans elsewhere? I mean, it's not easily quantified, but recall that Demon's Souls got a pretty reserved critical reception in Japan for being so hard, while American and European outlets generally praised it for that.

Demon's Souls reception in Japan is actually pretty interesting. It wasn't poorly received at all, and the difficulty was really not the issue. It was how the game was perceived when it was released, and how the media presented it. The game did get poor reviews, but that was because it was seen as a lower budget unpolished shovelware sort of title, even though it was a first party game. The marketing wasn't strong, and I don't think there was an expectation that it would sell well at all, so there was a low initiate shipment along with the bad reviews.

But when gamers bought the game and word of mouth started to spread, the game continued to sell, shipment after shipment sold out. For a market like Japan where most games are extremely front loaded, especially more hardcore games, it's really impressive that Demon's Souls sold 36k in the first week, and continued to sell until it hit a LTD of 168k. When it was released again on a budget label, it sold another 68k.

The positive word of mouth and excitement continued to grow after Dark Souls was announced, and Dark Souls sold 334k in Japan, with the budget re-release bundled with the DLC selling another 80k.

It's a good example of a franchise which no one really took seriously at all, growing and becoming a success based on almost word of mouth alone. The reason why Demon's Souls was really well received in the West immediately was because the positive impressions from Japan had already started to have an impact on how people throughout the industry viewed the game by the time it was finally released outside of Japan.
Zeal
Banned
(12-22-2012, 06:22 PM)
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Dark Souls would look so good running on Unreal 3, but please don't change that janky feel the combat has. Every souls fan knows what I mean. It isn't Dark Souls without the classic combat of the first two games.

It's so bad...it's good.
Raide
Member
(12-22-2012, 06:23 PM)
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I hope its UE3 or maybe push for UE4. They could get some stunning detail running with UE3, plus it would be great for PC use and all the Community Content (If supported of course)

They need an engine that deals with massive scale, as well as close-up detail on objects. UE3 or CryEngine would be suitable but I am guessing UE3 is just used more for the majority of developers.
UrbanRats
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(12-22-2012, 06:32 PM)
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Originally Posted by Zeal

Dark Souls would look so good running on Unreal 3, but please don't change that janky feel the combat has. Every souls fan knows what I mean. It isn't Dark Souls without the classic combat of the first two games.

It's so bad...it's good.

What's so bad about DkS combat? It's slow and has weight, and the stamina management is great.
All in all is a great way to prevent the mindless bashing while running in circles of Elder Scrolls, for example.
I like the sense of gravity every blow has, unlike something like Dragon's Dogma, that is equally amazing, but more action and fast paced.
Risk Breaker
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(12-22-2012, 06:33 PM)
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Originally Posted by Zeal

Dark Souls would look so good running on Unreal 3, but please don't change that janky feel the combat has. Every souls fan knows what I mean. It isn't Dark Souls without the classic combat of the first two games.

It's so bad...it's good.


What.
MrOogieBoogie
BioShock Infinite is like playing some homeless guy's vivid imagination
(12-22-2012, 06:34 PM)
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Originally Posted by Zeal

Dark Souls would look so good running on Unreal 3, but please don't change that janky feel the combat has. Every souls fan knows what I mean. It isn't Dark Souls without the classic combat of the first two games.

It's so bad...it's good.

what the fuck

Demon's/Dark Souls have some of the most impressive combat systems in any game, ever.

I don't even... What are you...

Explain yourself.
Jedi2016
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(12-22-2012, 06:38 PM)
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Originally Posted by Raide

I hope its UE3 or maybe push for UE4.

I'd be okay with UE4.
jim-jam bongs
most certainly will not be getting forcibly fucked by a gigantic canoe
(12-22-2012, 06:39 PM)
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I think he just means that it's not Mario Galaxy; you can't stop on a dime and do backflips on command, every move you make has a well considered animation behind it which needs to finish before the game will accept your next input, etcetera. I wouldn't use the word janky to describe it myself but if that's what he means then I totally agree.
Serra
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(12-22-2012, 06:40 PM)
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Originally Posted by Zeal

Dark Souls would look so good running on Unreal 3, but please don't change that janky feel the combat has. Every souls fan knows what I mean. It isn't Dark Souls without the classic combat of the first two games.

It's so bad...it's good.

no i dont
RockTurtle
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(12-22-2012, 06:43 PM)
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I like the combat of Demon's/dark souls.

it's heavy, it's slow when equip yourself for it, it's fast when you equip yourself for it.

it was a nice step up from the monster hunter series which i hadnt played in a long time.

in the elder scrolls you just circle n strafe everything while bombarding nonstop with attacks most of the time.
Aeana
Medal Princess
(12-22-2012, 06:44 PM)
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Please don't post stuff that is exclusively in Japanese. It tends to lead to misinformation as people scramble to use machine translators. There are lots of people here, including a couple on the mod staff, who can help with translation of stuff like this for the creation of an informative thread.
Zefah
Member
(12-22-2012, 06:48 PM)

Originally Posted by duckroll

Google Translate is still pretty bad. The question was about what Shibuya has been doing lately, before working on Dark Souls 2. He says that after finishing ACE:R, he took charge of leading the development of a new internal engine, as well as middleware licensing. This new engine is also what they'll be using for Dark Souls 2. Even with an internal engine, it is not unusual that modern development requires middleware for various other components. It's just more practical that way.

There are various other details in the interview too, like how Shibuya has been watching Walking Dead lately, and he's a big fan of the survival component in the show, etc.

検証 doesn't mean licensing in the meaning I'm familiar with. It's just testing or making sure that something works properly.

I've got some time today, so I'd be happy to translate the whole interview unless someone else is already working on it?
duckroll
mashadar's Nekomimi slave
(12-22-2012, 06:49 PM)
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Originally Posted by Zefah

検証 doesn't mean licensing in the meaning I'm familiar with. It's just testing or making sure that something works properly.

Yeah but it has to be licensed to be used. :P
Aeana
Medal Princess
(12-22-2012, 06:49 PM)
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Originally Posted by Zefah

検証 doesn't mean licensing in the meaning I'm familiar with. It's just testing or making sure that something works properly.

The quote says that he was evaluating middleware, but I think duckroll was talking about how it isn't unlikely for them to license middleware to augment an internally-developed engine.
Nirolak
Mrgrgr
(12-22-2012, 06:51 PM)
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Originally Posted by Zefah

検証 doesn't mean licensing in the meaning I'm familiar with. It's just testing or making sure that something works properly.

I've got some time today, so I'd be happy to translate the whole interview unless someone else is already working on it?

We already know they use some middleware since Dark Souls 1 had Havok.
Zefah
Member
(12-22-2012, 06:53 PM)

Originally Posted by Aeana

The quote says that he was evaluating middleware, but I think duckroll was talking about how it isn't unlikely for them to license middleware to augment an internally-developed engine.

That's an assumption, though. While it's highly likely that he is talking about middleware from external parties, it's also entirely possible that he's talking about the implementation of internally developed middleware. Even if it were external middleware as is highly likely, they may already have it licensed and he's just talking about its implementation in Dark Souls II. I don't see how making assumptions about what he's saying while at the same time decrying bad translations is a good way to go.
duckroll
mashadar's Nekomimi slave
(12-22-2012, 06:54 PM)
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Originally Posted by Zefah

I've got some time today, so I'd be happy to translate the whole interview unless someone else is already working on it?

That would actually be really helpful. I certainly don't want to translate the whole thing. Thanks. :)

Originally Posted by Zefah

That's an assumption, though. While it's highly likely that he is talking about middleware from external parties, it's also entirely possible that he's talking about the implementation of internally developed middleware.

I have never encountered the term "middleware" being used in English or Japanese where it does not mean an external set of tools being licensed. When programming tools are developed internally, they usually either refer to it as an engine, or general tools. Have you encountered such examples of middleware being used in that way?
Last edited by duckroll; 12-22-2012 at 06:56 PM.
Backfoggen
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(12-22-2012, 06:54 PM)
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Originally Posted by Jedi2016

I'd be okay with UE4.

Gamebryo.
Ridley327
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(12-22-2012, 06:59 PM)
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For people hoping for UE4: you guys do know that the game is set for the 360 and PS3, right?
jim-jam bongs
most certainly will not be getting forcibly fucked by a gigantic canoe
(12-22-2012, 06:59 PM)
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Originally Posted by Nirolak

We already know they use some middleware since Dark Souls 1 had Havok.

nothing like excessively floppy rag dolls to really ruin your game's tone
Zefah
Member
(12-22-2012, 07:01 PM)

Originally Posted by duckroll

That would actually be really helpful. I certainly don't want to translate the whole thing. Thanks. :)



I have never encountered the term "middleware" being used in English or Japanese where it does not mean an external set of tools being licensed. When programming tools are developed internally, they usually either refer to it as an engine, or general tools. Have you encountered such examples of middleware being used in that way?

I've seen cases of "internal middleware," but you're probably right that it's safe to assume that they are licensing external stuff like Havok and such. I'm probably being too anal about it, honestly. I just think that, by translating that as "licensing," it may give people the impression that they are licensing entirely new middleware, when it may very well be the case that he was just talking about testing and implementing Havok, which they already used in previous titles, into their new engine.

Anyway, I'll get to work on the interview!
Ridley327
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(12-22-2012, 07:01 PM)
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Originally Posted by jim-jam bongs

nothing like excessively floppy rag dolls to really ruin your game's tone

Figuring out how to launch undead corpses into the air with a roll was the best Havok implementation ever.
duckroll
mashadar's Nekomimi slave
(12-22-2012, 07:05 PM)
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Originally Posted by Zefah

I've seen cases of "internal middleware," but you're probably right that it's safe to assume that they are licensing external stuff like Havok and such. I'm probably being too anal about it, honestly. I just think that, by translating that as "licensing," it may give people the impression that they are licensing entirely new middleware, when it may very well be the case that he was just talking about testing Havok physics, which they already used in previous titles.

Anyway, I'll get to work on the interview!

Well, he does say "新しいミドルウェアの検証" which indicates pretty clearly that they were testing out new types of middleware. My logical assumption is that they were testing out different stuff to decide what would be suitable to license and use, hence I paraphrased it that way.
KarmaCow
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(12-22-2012, 07:05 PM)
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Originally Posted by jim-jam bongs

nothing like excessively floppy rag dolls to really ruin your game's tone

Yea while having the firebug's bodies in Blighttown wrap around your legs was creepy as shit, seeing the lumbering stone guardian zero-mass ragdoll the second the dying animation ends was real shame.
Raide
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(12-22-2012, 07:07 PM)
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Originally Posted by Jedi2016

I'd be okay with UE4.

If they are pushing for Next-Gen, it would be awesome to see it appear as a launch title for 720.

At the very least we know it will look stunning on PC's.
Zefah
Member
(12-22-2012, 07:11 PM)

Originally Posted by duckroll

Well, he does say "新しいミドルウェアの検証" which indicates pretty clearly that they were testing out new types of middleware. My logical assumption is that they were testing out different stuff to decide what would be suitable to license and use, hence I paraphrased it that way.

Hah! Well now I feel like an idiot. In my haste to disagree, I totally missed the "新しい" part. How embarrassing. My apologies!
jim-jam bongs
most certainly will not be getting forcibly fucked by a gigantic canoe
(12-22-2012, 07:15 PM)
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Originally Posted by Ridley327

Figuring out how to launch undead corpses into the air with a roll was the best Havok implementation ever.

imagine if bosses ragdolled too, you could throw the iron golem at his buddy with the huge balls
Raide
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(12-22-2012, 07:23 PM)
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As much as I love the goofy ragdoll, I think the game would be way more awesome with a more realistic system in place. Maybe something like the euphoria engine. The kick move would be utterly awesome if you could sneak up behind them and "This is sparta!" style boot them off.
icecream
Public Health Threat
(12-22-2012, 07:32 PM)
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Originally Posted by Zefah

Hah! Well now I feel like an idiot. In my haste to disagree.

Which usually happens when someone brings up Japanese translation.
Zefah
Member
(12-22-2012, 08:41 PM)
Here's the first part with Miyazaki. I'll work on the rest of the interview a bit later:

4Gamer:
Miyazaki-san, I was very surprised to hear that you won’t be directly involved in the development of Dark Souls II.

Miyazaki:
That’s correct. Shibuya is working as the director for Dark Souls II. He’s worked on the Another Century’s Episode series--most recently R.

4Gamer:
With that being so, what’s going to happen to you?

Miyazaki:
Saying “what’s going to happen” makes it sound like a big deal (laughs). My official title is still “supervisor.”

4Gamer:
With Dark Souls really being your series—having developed Demon’s Souls and Dark Souls—I think a lot of fans are going to feel uneasy about your separating from it.

Miyazaki:
Hmm, I wonder…

Well, either way, I don’t think anyone needs to feel uneasy in that sense. The director—Shibuya—is far more experienced than me as a developer, and he understands the idea and delicate nuance of Dark Souls, so I think it’s OK to trust him.

4Gamer:
Why did you step away from the development of Dark Souls II in the first place?

Miyazaki:
That decision came from the company.

When it comes to Dark Souls, I have a lot of affection towards it and things to gain from it. Being so attached to the title, it would be a lie if I were to say I’m not a bit sad.

4Gamer:
Of course.

Miyazaki:
However, I don’t look negatively at the decision to change directors. While I hesitate to say this myself, I think that Dark Souls, as a game base, has immense potential, and a change in directors will give it a chance to be released from narrow frame or limitations that I imposed upon it. As someone who created the game base of Dark Souls, I would really like to see what that potential is.

At the same time, I’m also working as director on another project, so there’s that.

4Gamer:
Really? That’s some pretty huge news. Is it OK to put that in article?

Miyazaki:
Well, I don’t mind. It would be weird if I said I wasn't working on anything. With that said, we’re not at the point where I can speak to specifics about the project, and this interview is about Dark Souls II, so let’s leave it at that.

4Gamer:
OK. So, going back to Dark Souls II, you said that your title on the project is “supervisor.” What exactly does this role involve?

Miyazaki:
There are two main parts to the role. The first is deciding the more broad direction for Dark Souls II.

4Gamer:
So, kind of like a producer?

Miyazaki:
It’s a little different. In terms of a producer’s job, it’s more like I did only the first part. Frankly, what I did was make decisions about things that would be easier if I just decided them on my own. Things like making sure our budget is enough, and what our development schedule will be like, including testing. When it comes to things that are a bit closer to players, I decided that we should have our own game servers this time, and that we shouldn't sell individual items or weapons as DLC—stuff like that.

4Gamer:
What’s the other main part to your role?

Miyazaki:
It’s overall supervision, although I don’t like how important that makes me sound.

That involves making sure that I convey things like the core game mechanics that I feel should not be taken out of a sequel to Dark Souls, as well as what we (the development team of the previous title) learned from working on the game, and the many points that we felt could be improved. Also, if I feel things are getting a bit off course, I explain the concept again, and ask the team to consider making adjustments. In reality, there have already been a quite a few cases where I've done such things, and depending on the situation, I may need to re-think the boundaries of the “supervisor” role.

4Gamer:
So rather than giving direct instructions, you’re in a more indirect role?

Miyazaki:
I don’t intend to interfere more than necessary. I think, in the end, a game should be created under a director’s coherent vision, and you end up getting better results when that happens. I mentioned core game mechanics earlier, and I think there are many elements that can be fixed, improved, or adjusted in that area. When it comes to the feel of the world, the story, and the artwork, all of that is rather subjective, and comes down to individual sense, so I try to keep my mouth shut as much as possible.

As I said before, Shibuya is a very experienced developer with many projects under his belt, and honestly, not a whole lot of supervision is required, nor do I think it’s desired.

4Gamer:
However, is there no worry that, when the creator changes, the direction of the game and core elements might deviate?

Miyazaki:
In general, I understand the concern.

However, when it comes to Dark Souls, so many people in the media and so many of our players have given us very passionate and amazing reviews and impressions, as well as criticism and complaints, and the majority of these are all kind of pointing in the same direction. From a creator’s perspective, this makes Dark souls a very fortunate and rare title, indeed.

All of these things will prove to be valuable assets in ensuring that the direction and core elements of Dark Souls II don’t get off track, and with that in mind, I hope everyone will put their trust in the new director and the development team.

So, with that said, I think it would be good for Shibuya to get a chance to talk directly. I don’t want to inconvenience him and his team any more by just saying whatever comes to my mind (laughs).
Last edited by Zefah; 12-23-2012 at 07:54 AM.
Danielsan
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(12-22-2012, 08:47 PM)
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The fact that Bamco decided to kick Miyazaki from the Dark Souls director seat pisses me off to no end. He clearly wanted to direct the sequel. The series is very much a product of his involvement.
Serra
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(12-22-2012, 08:50 PM)
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Thanks for the translation!

Someone mentioned Havok: I fucking loved the way the enemies ragdolled, sure it was totally ridiculous but it was endearing. Kinda janky in a loveable way.

I once got a giant rat stuck on top of my character, I couldn't see shit and died.

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