30min PSVR technical presentation (Feb.2016)

#1
Dr.Richard Marks had a talk about PSVR at the Vision AR/VR Summit last week. The video has now been released online: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XZVVs5O8NC0

Some details as I watch:
  • *<18ms super low latency thanks to fixed hardware.
  • 100degree FOV.
  • Console effectively ~60% more powerful than same-spec PC (as reported by middleware providers, not Sony).
    Same story from a VR developer on Reddit:

    "PSVR is extremely close to being on par with Vive and the Rift w/ a gtx970 based on the tests I've done. The team from Epic (Nick & Tom) have also stated the same in at least one of their VR Twitch streams. If your app runs at 90Hz on a PC with a gtx970 then you should be very close to 60 on the ps4. And with the 120Hz reprojection applied it's glassy smooth."
  • Reprojection was previously on as an option but now Sony has made it permanently on as it has no down-sides (contra keeping it off).
  • The breakout box doesn't touch the signal between the PS4 and the PSVR, just takes it post and warps it for TV. The only thing it feeds to the PSVR is the 3D audio which it *does* process. No PS4 GPU/CPU cycles spent on Audio.
  • Reconfirms that the only new hardware is the PSVR hmd itself, the rest is what's already in the market (PS4 camera, PS Move, DS4).

Here's a video of the 'Disc Battle' demo that had an hardware error during PSX keynote (here's how it is when working): https://youtu.be/XZVVs5O8NC0?t=1601
 
#4
"You really don't see that much screen door at all."

I figured that was going to be an issue given the resolution, but am hoping it isn't so noticeable as to impact my enjoyment.
 
#16
Console effectively ~60% more powerful than same-spec PC (as reported by middleware providers, not Sony)
So what does that mean? I don't really know how the PS4 stacks up in terms of PC specs or what 60% more powerful looks like. In terms of VR graphics does that mean it will be close to PS4 level visuals, PS3 level, somewhere in between, below etc. etc.?
 
#20
The part that interests me the most is this "3D audio". I haven't heard a lot about it. Is it going to use some sort of crazy binaural encoding? Tech like that has been explored before but has flopped in the past. The fact that it needs its own co-processor in the black box makes it even more interesting.
 
#22
That cant be right can it?
i haven't tried others, but its noticeable on PSVR, its more noticeable in "realistic" graphic games

edit...

Remember, screen door effect is different from being able to see individual pixels. Screen door effect is about seeing the gap in between individual pixels

So the PC VR headsets have a better resolution and it will be harder to discern individual pixels on them. But the screen door effect could be better on PSVR if they have smaller gaps between each pixel.
yeah, i was definitely seeing this and not SDE
 
#23
That cant be right can it?
Remember, screen door effect is different from being able to see individual pixels. Screen door effect is about seeing the gap in between individual pixels

So the PC VR headsets have a better resolution and it will be harder to discern individual pixels on them. But the screen door effect could be better on PSVR if they have smaller gaps between each pixel.
 
#24
i haven't tried others, but its noticeable on PSVR, its more noticeable in "realistic" graphic games
You can see the pixels on PSVR, which is likely what you're talking about, but SDE is about the gaps between the pixels, which creates a mesh-like appearance to the visuals. For all intents and purposes, PSVR has near-zero SDE based on tons of people that have used it.

Then again, maybe you have super eyes.
 
#28
[*]Console effectively ~60% more powerful than same-spec PC (as reported by middleware providers, not Sony)
Same story from a VR developer on Reddit:

"PSVR is extremely close to being on par with Vive and the Rift w/ a gtx970 based on the tests I've done. The team from Epic (Nick & Tom) have also stated the same in at least one of their VR Twitch streams. If your app runs at 90Hz on a PC with a gtx970 then you should be very close to 60 on the ps4. And with the 120Hz reprojection applied it's glassy smooth."
 
#30
You can see the pixels on PSVR, which is likely what you're talking about, but SDE is about the gaps between the pixels, which creates a mesh-like appearance to the visuals. For all intents and purposes, PSVR has near-zero SDE based on tons of people that have used it.

Then again, maybe you have super eyes.
yup after the follow up post below mine explaining what i was seeing, its definitely the pixels :)

Anyway, on THAT topic, i saw it much less in some of the more colorful games, and it was more distracting in games like The Kitchen and UD:Rush of Blood
 
#31
So what does that mean? I don't really know how the PS4 stacks up in terms of PC specs or what 60% more powerful looks like. In terms of VR graphics does that mean it will close to PS4 level visuals, PS3 level, somewhere in between, below etc. etc.?
Basically the PS4 specs can be pushed harder than what is normal, probably down to the optimization that can be achieved on fixed hardware (as every PS4 is the same) where as there are many different configurations for PC, so they can't optimize for every PC option available quite as well.

Something like that anyway.
 
#32
60% more powerful compared to same spec PC.

I wonder if that's based on 60 to 120 reprojection vs a 90 scenario, or without it? Will watch later.
 
#33
Same story from a VR developer on Reddit:

"PSVR is extremely close to being on par with Vive and the Rift w/ a gtx970 based on the tests I've done. The team from Epic (Nick & Tom) have also stated the same in at least one of their VR Twitch streams. If your app runs at 90Hz on a PC with a gtx970 then you should be very close to 60 on the ps4. And with the 120Hz reprojection applied it's glassy smooth."
Very interesting. I am getting pretty excited.
 
#35
no after the follow up post below mine explaining what i was seeing, its definitely the pixels :)

Anyway, on THAT topic, i saw it much less in some of the more colorful games, and it was more distracting in games like The Kitchen and UD:Rush of Blood
Uh, that post said exactly what I did. So, I was right; you were referring to the pixels.
 
#36
Uh, that post said exactly what I did. So, I was right; you were referring to the pixels.
yes, my no was meant to contradict myself, not you. Yes, i agree. I edited the "No" to remove confusion.

I'm not sure if it was the colors, or the attempt at realism that made it more noticeable then things like Rez that is faster / much more colorful where its harder to notice.
 
#37
Same story from a VR developer on Reddit:

"PSVR is extremely close to being on par with Vive and the Rift w/ a gtx970 based on the tests I've done. The team from Epic (Nick & Tom) have also stated the same in at least one of their VR Twitch streams. If your app runs at 90Hz on a PC with a gtx970 then you should be very close to 60 on the ps4. And with the 120Hz reprojection applied it's glassy smooth."
That basically answers my question...any really excites me!
 
#42
Something that piqued my curiosity when watching this.

Cropped from his slides, is what looks to be direct feed from the PSVR before the barrel distortion is unwrapped for the TV - it's the shape of the image for each eye, it's completely circular whereas feed from the Oculus Rift has a different distortion applied.

PSVR;
DK2;
There was another talk that said Sony has adjusted their optics for the PSVR's screen so it has higher pixel density in the centre compared to the rest. It's clearly related to the type of image distortion they use also.
 
#43
[*]Reprojection was previously on as an option but now Sony has made it permanently on as it has no down-sides
This isn't true at all. Reprojection will not correct for translational movement and the effect that will have. It' can't as far as I know. No idea why he would say this.
 
#44
Basically the PS4 specs can be pushed harder than what is normal, probably down to the optimization that can be achieved on fixed hardware (as every PS4 is the same) where as there are many different configurations for PC, so they can't optimize for every PC option available quite as well.

Something like that anyway.
The unified memory pool likely enables some techniques which are more expensive on more general systems.
 
#46
not new info but maybe interesting for in the OP:

Render options:
120Hz display, 120Hz rendering
120Hz display, 60hHz rendering
90Hz display, 90Hz rendering
 
#47
Same story from a VR developer on Reddit:

"PSVR is extremely close to being on par with Vive and the Rift w/ a gtx970 based on the tests I've done. The team from Epic (Nick & Tom) have also stated the same in at least one of their VR Twitch streams. If your app runs at 90Hz on a PC with a gtx970 then you should be very close to 60 on the ps4. And with the 120Hz reprojection applied it's glassy smooth."
Wow thats exciting. Makes sense I don't know how UC4 looks the way it does. Straight voodoo going on.
 
#48
Glad he's touched upon the Breakout box's role for PSVR, I'll transcribe later but its 12 minutes in.
As expected, the breakout box sounds like it's just there for the 120hz reprojection, 3D audio and to "dewarp" the image for the TV "social experience". Nothing that would cause the price of PSVR to be astronomically high.
 
#49
True RGB Oled pixels with practically no space between the pixels. And great optics.
yeah, this was the same reason I preferred 480p DLP projectors over 720p LCD projectors in the mid-2000s, the SDE effect on the LCDs was so much more pronounced despite the LCDs having over twice the pixel density