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A deeper look at the fumbles in Persona 5's localization, and the industry in general

Jan 20, 2010
16,691
28
890
looks like no one got this joke :(

The originator of this site just made a seppuku!

I am an expert myself...still I don't know how much is your knowledge of Japanese language, which is overflowing with the nuance and beauty of an ancient civilization. In Japan, you can not be successful if you disrespect your superiors with unrespectful speech (as expected of America). When a translator missed that nuance by taking a liberty, he loses face for himself and his ancestors. If so, submission is the only way to redemption!!

When they heard about this, a fan of anime and JRPG will no longer buy products where this guy was translation! This is HUGE. Your trifle laughter won't hurt me, because I know that this man now made the whole fanbase his enemy!

Translator who made this website: publicly apologize and delete it from internet or you can say to your career: "Saraba!"
 

Zefah

Gold Member
Jan 7, 2007
44,824
26,067
1,805
As someone who has worked as a translator in video games localization, reading through this site was very satisfying. There is some really bad work in Persona 5.

Some of those lines show a simple lack of comprehension of the original Japanese. It's as if they didn't have any native speakers checking their work.
 

Toxi

Banned
May 29, 2013
41,538
1
0
Well actually judging by the people who have written articles and/or made entire websites about it, it appears some fans of the recent fire emblem fates (or at least it's localization) are actually the biggest critics.

Fun fact: The same person who made a website about persona 5's localization defended fates as being perfect and not having issues at all. Oh and for extra fun? He defended radical character shifts and personality overhauls as part of the localization process and people complaining about them were just obsessed with "literal" translations.

Reading through the website again with that knowledge put a lot of things into context. Not to mention the rather noteworthy collection of articles that all got released at once. Looks like some people are trying to make a point about how ltieral translations are bad, so fates totally overhauling character's arcs, personalities, and tone was perfectly fine.
As expected from an account that was approved nearly 2 years ago but only decided to start posting today. I guess it can't be helped.
 

silveralen

Neo Member
Jun 10, 2015
28
0
0
They may have posted all manner of things in hiding on other websites, but here such lies and false accounts are eventually exposed.

"Why did you say X?

"I never said that"

"We have a picture of you saying X"

"It was taken out of context, also ignore the fact me saying X would be totally consitent with everything else I've done and said"

"Seems legit to me"
 

rhandino

Banned
Sep 3, 2014
11,093
0
0
It can't possibly be someone trying to make an extended point about how awful literal translations are, despite most evidence suggesting people much prefer a this persona translation to the fates translation.
 

Phu

Banned
Jun 17, 2014
3,340
5
0
Considering the "out of context comment" was him discussing why literal translations weren't needed when discussing the fire emblem fates game, a game critiqued for basically ignoring the source material on multiple occasions....

and considering he made a point about how literal translations were "objectively bad"

and we had how many articles pop up in the last day or so? A couple weeks after this game was released? From how many sites that defended fates?

It can't possibly be someone trying to make an extended point about how awful literal translations are, despite most evidence suggesting people much prefer a this persona translation to the fates translation.

We know it can't be that because he said so and there is no possible reason he wouldn't be forthcoming on that subject.

What if I told you there was a middle ground, where the necessary changes were made while still keeping true to the original source?
 

ElFly

Member
Sep 3, 2006
16,567
0
0
Your explanation doesn't make sense in the context of the scene described, especially considering the Japanese version speaks in a past-tense. The English version doesn't even hint that he's referred to a call he received earlier or that he wants Sae to get on with her interrogation. The call she receives has nothing to do with the conversation they were having, it just happens that she got it in the middle of them talking.

What it should be is more along the lines of:

-Before the scene starts, the SIU Director knew Sae was gonna show up even though she isn't supposed to and that it was no use/less trouble not to fight it and just let her do her thing [the interrogation].
-He calls the Older Detective to let him know, 'hey, this lady's gonna show up even though this isn't her thing, but just let her do it anyway'
-Sae shows up and some guy tells he she isn't allowed
-Older Detective shows up and is like, 'listen, I got a call about you showing up so just hurry and get your shit over with'
-*ring ring* Sae picks up the phone. It's the SIU director. "I knew you were gonna pull this stunt. I don't know what you'll get out of it, but whatever'

But in English it sounds like Older Detective predicted a call and wants her to finish it quickly.

again, you are trying too hard to make it seem like the game is implying the older detective has magic telephone powers

what happens is

-SIU director calls the building, tells them to get Sae if she appears
-Sae shows up
-older guy hangs or leaves director waiting on phone, goes to Sae and goes hey the director wants to talk to you
-Director hangs on older guy and calls Sae directly

there's no magic involved! this has even happened to me. My boss will call the office I am going to because I haven't answered my phone because I was on the subway or something; he calls the office I am going to, I arrive, they tell me "your boss is looking for you" and bam, my boss calls on my phone and I pick up because I finally listened to the ring. it is a thing that happens

maybe it is not exactly what the original text said! but watching that scene and end up believing the older guy has telephone prediction powers is just being purposefully obtuse
 

silveralen

Neo Member
Jun 10, 2015
28
0
0
What if I told you there was a middle ground, where the necessary changes were made while still keeping true to the original source?

Oh no persona 5's translation could be better. I fully acknowledge that. I just found myself getting a bit annoyed when I realized how disingenuous the whole thing was.

I can acknowledge the translation was flawed while also acknowledge the person who made the website and most of the people who wrote those articles had other motivations.
 

saturnine

Member
Sep 23, 2013
1,042
0
0
Considering the "out of context comment" was him discussing why literal translations weren't needed when discussing the fire emblem fates game, a game critiqued for basically ignoring the source material on multiple occasions....

and considering he made a point about how literal translations were "objectively bad"

and we had how many articles pop up in the last day or so? A couple weeks after this game was released? From how many sites that defended fates?

It can't possibly be someone trying to make an extended point about how awful literal translations are, despite most evidence suggesting people much prefer a this persona translation to the fates translation.

We know it can't be that because he said so and there is no possible reason he wouldn't be forthcoming on that subject.
I don't see anything contradictory in saying both "literal translations are objectively bad" and "not respecting the meaning of the original text is bad".

To be clear : I don't care nor know much about the FE translation drama; I only quoted your first post because you were asserting something that was in direct contradiction with the site's creator own words.

edit: disregard this post at your discretion, I'd rather not pile on you.
 

FluxWaveZ

Member
Jul 24, 2012
38,083
1
0
again, you are trying too hard to make it seem like the game is implying the older detective has magic telephone powers

what happens is

-SIU director calls the building, tells them to get Sae if she appears
-Sae shows up
-older guy hangs or leaves director waiting on phone, goes to Sae and goes hey the director wants to talk to you
-Director hangs on older guy and calls Sae directly

there's no magic involved! this has even happened to me. My boss will call the office I am going to because I haven't answered my phone because I was on the subway or something; he calls the office I am going to, I arrive, they tell me "your boss is looking for you" and bam, my boss calls on my phone and I pick up because I finally listened to the ring. it is a thing that happens

maybe it is not exactly what the original text said! but to watch that scene and end up believing the older guy has telephone prediction powers is just being purposefully obtuse

No one believes that Older Detective has telephone prediction powers. That's not what the game seems to imply there, either. But most people do understand that the translation comes off as nonsense because it doesn't properly convey, at all, what Older Detective is actually saying. The meaning from the Japanese scene is completely lost, and left with a mess which makes English players scratch their heads.

If it came off clearly to you, that's great (and I'm not sure how it could, since the game makes no effort to imply that there was a previous phone call). But most players have the reaction Jeff did at 23:44. It makes no sense, and that's what makes it one of the worst examples from the game.

Your example isn't someone going, "There's a call from your boss," and then your phone ringing mere seconds later as if that person knew that your boss was going to call you right then.
 

Deepwater

Member
Aug 25, 2016
1,942
3
65
I only noticed a few gaffes in the script. Doesn't really bother me as it didn't affect my enjoyment of the game.

it was good enough and that's all that mattered to me.
 

silveralen

Neo Member
Jun 10, 2015
28
0
0
I don't see anything contradictory in saying both "literal translations are objectively bad" and "not respecting the meaning of the original text is bad".

To be clear : I don't care nor know much about the FE translation drama; I only quoted your first post because you were asserting something that was in direct contradiction with the site's creator own words.

edit: disregard this post at your discretion, I'd rather not pile on you.

Well, generally I find people whose tune changes after they are finding themselves the subject of criticism kinda suspect. Given that his original stance was also consistent with the main focus of his site, it reeked of backpedaling to me.

No worries, I don't exactly post here often or use this account so if I actually got bothered me i'd just bail.
 

senj

Member
Aug 16, 2009
165
0
610
As someone who has worked as a translator in video games localization, reading through this site was very satisfying. There is some really bad work in Persona 5.

Some of those lines show a simple lack of comprehension of the original Japanese. It's as if they didn't have any native speakers checking their work.

I actually think it's the exact opposite -- most of the translation issues read like it was done by a native Japanese speaker, and generally speaking you want the translation to be done by a native speaker of the language you're translating to, not the one you're translating from.

A couple of examples of where I think this is the case:

  • "He is a scum". People have been calling this "overly literal", but it's really the opposite problem. A word-for-word rendering from Japanese would get you "he is scum", because Japanese doesn't have grammatical articles (a/the). But because Japanese doesn't have articles, native Japanese speakers tend to struggle with figuring out when and where to use them in English (the rules are insanely complex and almost impossible for native English speakers to explain), and misplaced or wrong articles are a common mistake you will see them make in English.
  • That whole phone scene at the beginning with Sae. It's confusing because the verb tenses are messed up and the phrasing is way-off of anything that I think a native English speaker would write. It reads exactly like the kind of translation you get when someone has a less-than-stellar grasp of the language they're writing in.
 

Budi

Member
Apr 3, 2016
4,329
1
285
Finland
And they told me the defence force for the Witcher 3 combat was bad!

Not really at all invested in Persona series, but thanks for sharing the link OP. It's still really interesting stuff and a lot of work was clearly put into it.
 

Zefah

Gold Member
Jan 7, 2007
44,824
26,067
1,805
I actually think it's the exact opposite -- most of the translation issues read like it was done by a native Japanese speaker, and generally speaking you want the translation to be done by a native speaker of the language you're translating to, not the one you're translating from.

A couple of examples of where I think this is the case:

  • "He is a scum". People have been calling this "overly literal", but it's really the opposite problem. A word-for-word rendering from Japanese would get you "he is scum", because Japanese doesn't have grammatical articles (a/the). But because Japanese doesn't have articles, native Japanese speakers tend to struggle with figuring out when and where to use them in English (the rules are insanely complex and almost impossible for native English speakers to explain), and misplaced or wrong articles are a common mistake you will see them make in English.
  • That whole phone scene at the beginning with Sae. It's confusing because the verb tenses are messed up and the phrasing is way-off of anything that I think a native English speaker would write. It reads exactly like the kind of translation you get when someone has a less-than-stellar grasp of the language they're writing in.

I'm only speaking from my own experience, but stuff like:

たった今、お宅の部長さんから電話があった。
There's a call from your director.

いや、そういう訳じゃ...
Uh, that's exactly the case...

こんなのを俺のアンと間違うとはな。
I can't believe you mistook my Ann for someone like her.

改めて伝えておくが、問題を起こせば、即、退学処分だ。
To reiterate, just so we're clear, you will immediately be expelled if you cause any problems.

ちかく、おっけー?
Me near, OK?

etc. etc. demonstrate a lack of understanding the original Japanese. Especially the first two. Either that or they got broken by an editor for some reason and weren't spotted by anyone. I've seen that happen before, but I'm more inclined to believe it's a translator (possibly without context) having trouble understanding the source language.
 

Tookay

Member
Oct 26, 2011
9,987
0
0
Well, generally I find people whose tune changes after they are finding themselves the subject of criticism kinda suspect. Given that his original stance was also consistent with the main focus of his site, it reeked of backpedaling to me.

No worries, I don't exactly post here often or use this account so if I actually got bothered me i'd just bail.
Where is the backpedaling? Dude wants good localizations that promote readability and preserve the original intent, not literal translations​ that sacrifice those qualities for awkward prose.
 

Phu

Banned
Jun 17, 2014
3,340
5
0
No one believes that Older Detective has telephone prediction powers. That's not what the game seems to imply there, either. But most people do understand that the translation comes off as nonsense because it doesn't properly convey, at all, what Older Detective is actually saying. The meaning from the Japanese scene is completely lost, and left with a mess which makes English players scratch their heads.

If it came off clearly to you, that's great (and I'm not sure how it could, since the game makes no effort to imply that there was a previous phone call). But most players have the reaction Jeff did at 23:44. It makes no sense, and that's what makes it one of the worst examples from the game.

I was just about to post that video. Also, it doesn't make sense for the SIU Director to call the Older Detective, who doesn't know Sae and apparently doesn't have a cell phone he can carry around, to go find her [assuming she's there at that moment] so they can speak when the SIU Director has her number. The detective also makes no effort to notify Sae of what she's actually supposed to do, given everything else is correct. Is there an office she needs to be heading to? What is she supposed to be doing with that information? She doesn't work there, she doesn't know this guy. "There's a call from your director. Hurry and get it over with. To be frank, you're being an inconvenience." Ok? There's so many layers that have to get stitched for this to even kinda make sense in the few sentences there are to show it.

Why? Why do this when they could've just had the director say "I just received a call from your director"? I'm more inclined to bet it was a mistake more than anything.
 

TheBryanJZX90

Member
May 4, 2012
5,506
2
435
Well, generally I find people whose tune changes after they are finding themselves the subject of criticism kinda suspect. Given that his original stance was also consistent with the main focus of his site, it reeked of backpedaling to me.

No worries, I don't exactly post here often or use this account so if I actually got bothered me i'd just bail.

I'm still curious how on earth you came up with more people preferring a literal translation to a liberal one.
 

LegendofLex

Member
Aug 21, 2013
9,104
0
0
Do you not think a lot of the examples given are unreasonable and are stretches in an attempt to prove a point? I'm not denying that some errors exist, but the article writer is calling out Atlus for things that are his/her own misunderstanding.

I think every single one of the examples given sounds a million times worse than the kind of crap I have to edit at work every day so it actually feels like it came from someone with a good grasp of written and spoken English.

If someone who was working for me put out writing like that, they would no longer have a job.
 

TheBryanJZX90

Member
May 4, 2012
5,506
2
435
etc. etc. demonstrate a lack of understanding the original Japanese. Especially the first two. Either that or they got broken by an editor for some reason and weren't spotted by anyone. I've seen that happen before, but I'm more inclined to believe it's a translator (possibly without context) having trouble understanding the source language.

Hey wait what's wrong with 改めて being translated as "to reiterate"?
 

Nachos

Member
Jun 17, 2013
3,576
0
405
McDonaldland
Hey wait what's wrong with 改めて being translated as "to reiterate"?
Can't speak for the Japanese, but for the English, "to reiterate" and "just so we're clear" are redundant, with "to reiterate" sounding kind of out of place for a character like Sojiro (whom I'm pretty sure said it).
 

Phu

Banned
Jun 17, 2014
3,340
5
0
Can't speak for the Japanese, but for the English, "to reiterate" and "just so we're clear" are redundant, with "to reiterate" sounding kind of out of place for a character like Sojiro (whom I'm pretty sure said it).

It was the school principal.
 

senj

Member
Aug 16, 2009
165
0
610
etc. etc. demonstrate a lack of understanding the original Japanese. Especially the first two. Either that or they got broken by an editor for some reason and weren't spotted by anyone. I've seen that happen before, but I'm more inclined to believe it's a translator (possibly without context) having trouble understanding the source language.

It's hard to say -- none of those errors clearly scream either "common error made by native Japanese speaker struggling with English" or vice-versa. I don't know that I buy the lack-of-understanding explanation (like with "たった今、お宅の部長さんから電話があった", you're going to learn that あった is past tense of ある long before you learn anything else in that sentence, but that's the part the translation fumbles?).

Mistakes being introduced in the editorial process would make a lot of sense, though, especially if they were rushed for time.
 

LegendofLex

Member
Aug 21, 2013
9,104
0
0
Can't speak for the Japanese, but for the English, "to reiterate" and "just so we're clear" are redundant, with "to reiterate" sounding kind of out of place for a character like Sojiro (whom I'm pretty sure said it).

It's entirely possible for a person to have used both in common speech (people say redundant things all the time).

But it's hard to see how such a choice would be justified in this context, or (and especially) based on the Japanese not using redundant phrasing. There's no basis for it in the original text, and it definitely adds nothing to the English.
 

semiconscious

Member
Jun 30, 2006
7,663
85
1,330
I actually think it's the exact opposite -- most of the translation issues read like it was done by a native Japanese speaker, and generally speaking you want the translation to be done by a native speaker of the language you're translating to, not the one you're translating from.

A couple of examples of where I think this is the case:

  • "He is a scum". People have been calling this "overly literal", but it's really the opposite problem. A word-for-word rendering from Japanese would get you "he is scum", because Japanese doesn't have grammatical articles (a/the). But because Japanese doesn't have articles, native Japanese speakers tend to struggle with figuring out when and where to use them in English (the rules are insanely complex and almost impossible for native English speakers to explain), and misplaced or wrong articles are a common mistake you will see them make in English.
  • That whole phone scene at the beginning with Sae. It's confusing because the verb tenses are messed up and the phrasing is way-off of anything that I think a native English speaker would write. It reads exactly like the kind of translation you get when someone has a less-than-stellar grasp of the language they're writing in.

good post. when there's awkwardness in the text, this's indeed what it feels like to me: translated by someone for whom english is their second language...
 

Meier

Member
Jun 6, 2004
66,614
3
1,690
Austin, TX
www.last.fm
A lot of this stuff is super nitpicky and acts like context to scenes doesn't exist. There are certainly some legitimate issues (the Sae phone thing is totally weird, although they could also be patching the call through to her or something theoretically), but a lot of the cases he's pointing out are not hard to understand at all and certainly don't detract from the game. I'm on the 7th palace and haven't had any major issues other than with the pronunciation. My other issue with this sort of nitpicking is that a game like this is absolutely massive. There is a ton of work that goes into localizing it. If you have some issues with lets say 20 scenes out of 100 hours, that's really not that bad.

But kudos to this guy, he's apparently an editor and has managed to get this link RTed over 1,000 times so it's good exposure for him.
 

LegendofLex

Member
Aug 21, 2013
9,104
0
0
A lot of this stuff is super nitpicky and acts like context to scenes doesn't exist. I'm on the 7th palace and haven't had any major issues other than with the pronunciation. My other issue with this sort of nitpicking is that a game like this is absolutely massive. There is a ton of work that goes into localizing it. If you have some issues with lets say 20 scenes out of 100 hours, that's really not that bad.

This issue is actually directly addressed by the page, lol

If it isn't an excuse for native English authors writing books in native English (most of which have more words than most video games), it isn't an excuse for writers for a game being released in English, either.
 
Jun 19, 2013
23,820
1
0
"To reiterate, just so we're clear," is weird and looks like someone decided to translate 改めて a different way but left in the first one by mistake.
 

TheBryanJZX90

Member
May 4, 2012
5,506
2
435
"To reiterate, just so we're clear," is weird and looks like someone decided to translate 改めて s different way but left in the first one by mistake.

Yeah either one would have been fine by itself to me, and together it's a bit awkward/redundant in English, but since it was presented as an example of the original Japanese being misunderstood I was wondering if there was some aspect of the word 改めて that I was missing.
 

dan2026

Member
Jul 10, 2012
11,213
1
0
There are some cutscenes later in P5 where they just forgot to put subtitles in for a ton of lines.

It's really lazy.
 

silveralen

Neo Member
Jun 10, 2015
28
0
0
This issue is actually directly addressed by the page, lol

If it isn't an excuse for native English authors writing books in native English (most of which have more words than most video games), it isn't an excuse for writers for a game being released in English, either.

That's the same passage where he compares it to a book with 1 in 3 lines poorly worded and 1 in 5 with a major error. As opposed to the person above, who stated he noticed like 20 in his entire play through.

I'm still curious how on earth you came up with more people preferring a literal translation to a liberal one.

The fact that the bad liberal translation was getting push back before the game even launched, the bad literal translation is getting push back two weeks after with most people not even feeling the need to mention it.

I mean, persona 5's popularity pretty much indicates people aren't particularly bothered by a bad literal translation or it isn't actually as bad as people are making out to be (or some mix).
 

Frumix

Suffering From Success
Oct 19, 2012
8,813
1
495
Isn't this a case of Translation vs. Localization? They're very different things.

I'm 60hrs into P5, and it feels like a good translation--but lackluster localization.

The website specifically addresses this question and this type of thinking.
 

TheBryanJZX90

Member
May 4, 2012
5,506
2
435
The fact that the bad liberal translation was getting push back before the game even launched, the bad literal translation is getting push back two weeks after with most people not even feeling the need to mention it.

I mean, persona 5's popularity pretty much indicates people aren't particularly bothered by a bad literal translation or it isn't actually as bad as people are making out to be (or some mix).

So you pulled it out of your ass based on absolutely nothing. Got it!
 

zelas

Member
Nov 18, 2014
3,543
0
0
I have no issue with the translation/localization of P5 being subject to critique. In fact, i've refrained from commenting in this thread because I am in agreement with some posters.

That said, I quoted that phrase beause I found it very much hyperbole. Could they have done better? Yes. Is it a complete failure? No.

The website says "How Atlus fails fans of a landmark JRPG." Which part of that says COMPLETE trash or COMPLETE failure? Why do you think something can only be 100% a success or 100% a failure? Or that the word fail only represents catastrophe.

Look at this statement that's also from the website:
That's not to say it's unreadable, or completely without merit. But for a massive RPG from a highly successful franchise, it falls incredibly short of the standard it should be held to.

Are you also reading that statement as saying the localization effort was a complete failure too? That the effort was catastrophic instead of just disappointing?

If I expect something to be a best in class effort and instead its merely ok, its fails to meet my expectations. That's not hyperbole. What is hyperbole is you insisting that anyone who suggest Atlus could have done better actually thinks P5's localization is nothing more than complete failure.
 

rucury

Banned
May 9, 2015
523
1
0
I mean, persona 5's popularity pretty much indicates people aren't particularly bothered by a bad literal translation or it isn't actually as bad as people are making out to be (or some mix).

That's not how it works. Persona 5 was poised to be a relative hit from the get-go. Also, there is no contradiction there. I bought it, and yet I am bothered by the bad localization job. More than anything, I think its popularity is a testament to how good Persona 4 was and people assuming that the localization work would be up to par with that title.
 

Zefah

Gold Member
Jan 7, 2007
44,824
26,067
1,805
Hey wait what's wrong with 改めて being translated as "to reiterate"?

It depends on the context. It can mean that, but it can also just mean "to be clear," as it does in this case, or just be used as a generic formal phrase to preface something you really want to be sure gets through to the listener.

This may just be a situation of the translator lacking context completely.

It's hard to say -- none of those errors clearly scream either "common error made by native Japanese speaker struggling with English" or vice-versa. I don't know that I buy the lack-of-understanding explanation (like with "たった今、お宅の部長さんから電話があった", you're going to learn that あった is past tense of ある long before you learn anything else in that sentence, but that's the part the translation fumbles?).

Mistakes being introduced in the editorial process would make a lot of sense, though, especially if they were rushed for time.

In that example, I imagined that the person translating had a limited understanding of たった今, thinking it could only mean "right now in this immediate moment" rather than "just now" (which actually implies a brief amount of time in the past).
 

Toxi

Banned
May 29, 2013
41,538
1
0
You haven't voted until now? That's problematic as a member of society, you know...
I love this line. The way it's phrased makes it sound like a Saturday Morning PSA.
 

Famassu

Member
Sep 11, 2010
16,035
1
0
"Why did you say X?

"I never said that"

"We have a picture of you saying X"

"It was taken out of context, also ignore the fact me saying X would be totally consitent with everything else I've done and said"

"Seems legit to me"
You don't seem to understand anything he's writing. Literal translations ARE usually objectively bad because most languages are so vastly different that they do not sound good when doing such a straighforward translation in a large number of cases (perhaps most cases). That doesn't mean he supports games just going totally ham with characters, their motivations & shit when doing a more liberal localization, changing things willynilly. He defended Fates because he thinks that Fates' English dialogue is well written/translated from a readability POV.

He does not defend the localization team taking so many liberties that character motivations are muddled or switch throughout the story when they do not in the original, he just thinks that Fates dialogue reads better and as such it is a better localization than Persona 5's. Of course if it does go so far with its liberties that the original intent is just completely gone or even turned around, no one is saying THAT is ok either. Still, in most localization cases taking SOME liberties is far preferable to straight, literal translations. He does not argue that no matter how badly done the liberties taken are, it's better than literal translations.

So whatever you are arguing here is based on you misunderstanding all of his argument or twisting & exaggerating his arguments into what he is not arguing.
 
Jul 20, 2009
7,377
1
885
NYC
There are some cutscenes later in P5 where they just forgot to put subtitles in for a ton of lines.

It's really lazy.
This doesn't come up as much as it should.

The cutscenes in the last twenty hours of the game are an absolute mess with how much isn't subtitled.
 

PshycoNinja

Member
Jul 10, 2012
6,661
0
0
Los Angeles Area
If this is considered nit-picking then I don't really know what to say...

I'm just glad people don't see the actual nit-picking that occurs on professional localization teams that scrutinize every word in every clause of every sentence.
 

IcyStorm

Member
Nov 26, 2012
407
0
550
lol

Translation and intent of the creator aside, is it really too much to ask that at the bare minimum the English writing is correct? It's Atlus, so is it so bad to have standards? Yakuza 0 is also massive, and while although you can debate the actual localization of things like jokes and puns and whatnot, its writing is rarely if ever grammatically incorrect or awkward. I feel like Persona 5 should deserve at least that much. I don't understand why people have a problem with critiquing this stuff. Why is it so hard to accept that some people want things to be the best they can be?
 

encephalon

Member
Feb 19, 2010
6,089
1
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"Literal" translations aren't a matter of personal taste, they more or less don't exist. At least for Japanese.

Furthermore, while the way different languages construct the same thoughts differently may be interesting, but focusing on it doesn't bring you closer to the original text, it pulls you farther away. Natural Japanese sounds like natural English to those experiencing it.