A helpful tip: use 0-255 RGB range on your PC

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#1
I've known about the 0-255 vs. 16-235 debate for years but I always assumed that I had my PC set for full coverage. Then yesterday, while trying to find a video codec that had the right gamma properties, I noticed that my computer was actually set on 16-235 or something similar. So I changed my settings in the Nvidia control panel and noticed that all of the videos on my computer now look much better.

Anyway, I just wanted to make sure that more people know about this tweak.



Old (16-235)


New (0-255)


Old (16-235)


New (0-255)
 
#9
That's weird that yours was set to 16-235, as computer monitors are generally 0-255, and 0-255 is generally the default for computer monitors. Do you have your computer hooked up to a TV by any chance? edit: nm, I see its an ASUS monitor.

It's not really a matter of things looking better or worse, but correct. The right setting needs to be applied to the monitor/tv.
 

BlueTsunami

there is joy in sucking dick
#14
I can see a difference with the pic of the back of the car,not so much with the other 2.
Opening up both in individual tabs and flipping back and forth will make the differences jump out

Images look like they have higher contrast which is great (if your not clipping and crushing the tonal range). Nothing worse than a muddy, flat looking image
 

Timedog

good credit (by proxy)
#22
I don't have a clue how to find this or change this in settings and I can't see a difference between the photos and I have a decent monitor.
 
#24
People really can't see a difference? I mean, maybe not in the second one, but the white glow is gone in the first picture. Certain areas, like the back of car or bottom of the steering wheel are much darker in the second too.

I'm using a lenovo thinkpad too :lol
 

MasterShotgun

brazen editing lynx
#27
Never realized this was an option. Mine also defaulted to 16-235. It's a laptop monitor if that means anything. I compared the two settings with a short video and instantly noticed the difference. Does this also affect games? If so, fuck yeah.
 
#33
Hmm, I don't have the first 4 squares. Changing my contrast/brightness does nothing.

I have 2 Dell 24" U2410's if that makes a difference.
I can see them all. 2011 MBP currently in Windows 7.

Display is color-calibrated, though I don't think that matters in this test.


edit: yes, your display's color profile may affect your results, as can any custom color settings you've "eyeballed to taste".


Exactly.
This is the same as Full RGB on ps3... some people might be wowed by the way it makes graphics pop, but you lose a lot of detail in dark areas.
sounds like little more than what increased saturation does. makes shit more "vibrant", while decreasing actual color accuracy and causing black/white crush on the top and bottom ends.
 
#34
Exactly.
This is the same as Full RGB on ps3... some people might be wowed by the way it makes graphics pop, but you lose a lot of detail in dark areas.
I think if you're using a computer monitor Full RGB/0-255 is most likely the better option, but only certain televisions work with it

I use 16-235 when outputting to my TV and 0-255 on my lcd monitor
 
#43
Your computer monitor should not have been set to limited RGB by the driver to begin with. Computer monitors are set at full RGB by default.
 
#44
Your computer monitor should not have been set to limited RGB to begin with. Computer monitors are set at full RGB by default.
not for me, whenever I clean install new nvidia drivers I have go to back and change the nvidia settings from "use the video player settings" to use nvidia settings with 0-255
 
#50
not for me, whenever I clean install new nvidia drivers I have go to back and change the nvidia settings from "use the video player settings" to use nvidia settings with 0-255
That's because video players should be able to display the correct RGB range by itself when viewing on a computer display. But then again I use MPC-HC to view videos.
 
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