A small note about Protests

Oct 24, 2017
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#1
Since the representation thread went way more off topic I guess we can do it in a separate thread. This is the conversation starter:
Wow..



It would be nice if reality were that simple. Disruption can cause backlash effects but it also gets attention from otherwise indifferent people. Go back and look at the history of civil rights protests. Similar arguments were made wielding faux civility standards against disruption, sit-ins, etc as cover for satisfaction with the status quo. Maybe it should give you pause to consider that what is considered blatant injustice today by most people was passed over back then with indifference. How will this period be understood in the future?
First of all I am from Europe and we have strict rules for protest marches which are allowed in any form or by any group. Yes even Nazis can march in Germany as long as they follow the rules. And all of these marches are if necessary are heavily police protected as well. First you need to apply for a date and location/route as well as the expected number of people protesting. For bigger protests you need to command people for the organization, safety etc. for routes these roads will be closed (depending on the number). This will certainly get your attention of the public and media.


So not only did you follow the rules but you are also creating a disruption but everything is planed and organized. So people who believe that this kind of shit here is the right way to do it. Is wrong because that way you not only endanger peoples life but also make many people who just tr to live their lives, do not want to get fired etc. not upset and angry about it.



And now compare it to this.



And if you want you can do this every day/week month etc. And it will always be regulated and as long you follow the rules they can also not say NO.

So which of these would you support?

I will tag @mckmas8808 as well
 
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Apr 18, 2018
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dunpachi.com
#2
We're American. We like loud noises and clapping and bullhorns. Our grandstanding on civil/political issues is literally written in other countries' history books, that's how seriously we take it. Meanwhile, American schoolkids don't know or give a shit about what some adult in Germany did for civil rights in whatever forgettable year.

I think there's some depth to this discussion, but that's the answer for why we do it differently here. It's all a part of our political play-acting. If you're not weeping in anguish for the camera, it's not genuine. If you're not shouting in someone's face, you're not really serious about it.

Haven't you watched our reality TV? Why would our protests be any different?
 
Dec 8, 2018
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#5
Shutting down freeways is just a quick way to get the working class to hate you. Owning a trucking company I have lost thousands of dollars due to random shutdowns around the country since 2015 which by extension impacts my employees.
 
Oct 26, 2018
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#6
When it comes to big protests (especially multi-day ones), never understood people's availability.

These people unemployed bums? Or they call in sick and protest for 3 days straight?

They sure have a lot of time on their hands.
 
Apr 9, 2009
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#7
The last protest I attended was pretty respectful. We weren't blocking traffic or destroying property. Just a lot of chants and a few speeches from some congresssmen.

I would never participate in anything that blocked peoples' commute. Thats extremely inconsiderate and unjustifiable. If you are ok with more people hating you then by all means go ahead.

When it comes to big protests (especially multi-day ones), never understood people's availability.

These people unemployed bums? Or they call in sick and protest for 3 days straight?

They sure have a lot of time on their hands.
The yellow jacket ones in France went on for weeks. And they were, by definition, working class people. If you care about something you make it work. In their case they scheduled weekends.
 
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Feb 25, 2017
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#8
Protest in America used to mean something, with real goals and solutions to achieve social change. Now most of the protest we see in the media are merely social media outrage with no goals or even purpose outside of retaliation against personal slights and grievances and virtue signaling.
 
Apr 23, 2018
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deaftourette.com
#9
Shutting down freeways is just a quick way to get the working class to hate you. Owning a trucking company I have lost thousands of dollars due to random shutdowns around the country since 2015 which by extension impacts my employees.
That's part of the point... The sit ins during the 60s civil rights era hurt the pockets of companies that were being protested ... Even hurt the pockets of those not even connected .. when the desired change happened, the protests stopped ... Same with the Montgomery bus boycott of the 1950s...

It's not supposed to be convenient for you because it DEFINITELY isn't convenient for the people protesting. They risk getting arrested, hurt or killed (and yes, that's happened).

The civil Rights movement TRAINED their protesters... To not wince or flinch when being taunted... Something VERY different to today because no one has the patience anymore and aren't trying to be as stoic... The civil Rights movement lasted for more than. 10 years!

This is why Occupy WallStreet was a failure... They didn't affect the pockets of those they protested and were FAR enough away that those they protested didn't see them.
 
Jun 20, 2018
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#10
The yellow jacket ones in France went on for weeks. And they were, by definition, working class people. If you care about something you make it work. In their case they scheduled weekends.
More like two and a half months and it didnt stop it is still going on every weekend, most big media just stopped reporting on it in hopes it dies down and to give macron a opening to use pretty disgusting tactics of mass arrests... with predictable results.
 
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Aug 3, 2010
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In a cave outside of Whooville.
#11
People love bringing up the civil rights protests and other protests from the past when they talk about current ones, but they're not the same. Women legally had no right to vote. Black people legally had to sit in the back of a bus, couldn't go into businesses, couldn't use certain water fountains, ect. There were specific, actual goals for the protesters and they were noble.

A lot of these protests today make no sense. Sometimes it's a group of people just standing in the street saying we elected the wrong president. What's the goal? Re-doing the entire election process? No one knows why the fuck they're out there in their pink hats. They just wanted pictures for their Instagram accounts.

Or it's a group of black people stopping cars on the freeway from getting to the airport. And the goal? We need a law that says police can't shoot black people no matter what the situation was? There's no clear goal once again.

Remember Occupy Wall Street? A large group of people erected tents and sat outside as long as possible yelling into megaphones without any clear indication of what the hell they wanted. As far as I'm concerned, it was the birth of the SJW movement and the tactics haven't changed.
 
Apr 23, 2018
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deaftourette.com
#12
People love bringing up the civil rights protests and other protests from the past when they talk about current ones, but they're not the same. Women legally had no right to vote. Black people legally had to sit in the back of a bus, couldn't go into businesses, couldn't use certain water fountains, ect. There were specific, actual goals for the protesters and they were noble.

A lot of these protests today make no sense. Sometimes it's a group of people just standing in the street saying we elected the wrong president. What's the goal? Re-doing the entire election process? No one knows why the fuck they're out there in their pink hats. They just wanted pictures for their Instagram accounts.

Or it's a group of black people stopping cars on the freeway from getting to the airport. And the goal? We need a law that says police can't shoot black people no matter what the situation was? There's no clear goal once again.

Remember Occupy Wall Street? A large group of people erected tents and sat outside as long as possible yelling into megaphones without any clear indication of what the hell they wanted. As far as I'm concerned, it was the birth of the SJW movement and the tactics haven't changed.
That was my point in bringing up the CRM... Most of these protesters don't have a goal nor a plan to affect the change they purport to want. Occupy Wall Street was a great example (which I mentioned first)... What was the goal? How would they achieve the goal?

The CRM was effective because they brought SYMPATHY to their cause... By showing the WORLD the violence and injustice they regularly faced ON LIVE TELEVISION... but even then, a lot of people said they were trouble makers.

BLM needed a better vision to get everyone on their side because too many said (and say) that they're trouble makers... Irrespective of what it is they are looking to change .. granted ... some of what they fought for came to pass... Body Cams, citizen oversight... not all cities or states adopted these things ... But it's a start.
 
Aug 3, 2010
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In a cave outside of Whooville.
#13
^Yeah I hope you didn't think I was referencing you there. I just see it all the time when someone criticizes the modern pointless protests. There are always people chiming in with something like, "How do you think women got the right to vote?" And it's so annoying to me because those protests in the past were so necessary and so perfectly executed that comparing them to today's protests is infuriating.
 
Likes: DeafTourette