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American Muslims growing more liberal, Pew survey shows

ponpo

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Aug 22, 2011
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CNN
Pew Research

(CNN)American Muslims are growing more religiously and socially liberal, with the number who say society should accept homosexuality nearly doubling during the past decade, according to a major new survey.

Conducted by the Pew Research Center, the survey of 1,001 American Muslims depicts a community in tumult, with the vast majority disapproving of President Donald Trump and worrying about the direction of the country. Even so, many remain hopeful about their future in the United States, the survey found, despite persistent anxiety about Islamic extremism and religious discrimination.

The wide-ranging survey, which was released on Wednesday, solicited opinions on everything from religious practices and politics to terrorism and social values. In addition, Pew found that the American Muslim population has been rising steadily for a decade, adding about 100,000 people per year. An estimated 3.35 million Muslims now live in the United States, just 1% of the overall population.

But the study's most significant findings may be religious and social, not political.

In 2007, just 27% of American Muslims said society should approve of homosexuality. This year, more than half (52%) said the same, a leap that surprised even scholars who study Islam in America. Likewise, 10 years ago, 57% of American Muslims said there is more than one way to interpret Islamic teachings. In 2017, 64% agreed.

Asked about the essentials of the faith, an overwhelming percentage of Muslims, like Christians, said believing in God was most important. But issues like working for social justice (69%) and protecting the environment (62%) also scored high in the list of essentials for American Muslims.

There's some debate among scholars about whether American Muslims' increasing liberalism on issues like homosexuality is the result of recent immigrants' assimilation to mainstream American values or the rise of native-born millennials, who, like their non-Muslim peers, are more tolerant of the LGBT community.

But while millennial Muslims are more likely than foreign-born Muslims to say homosexuality should be accepted (60% vs. 49%), both groups saw an increase of more than 20 percentage points in the last decade, Pew found.

Muslim women are more likely than men to say it is harder to be a Muslim in the United States today (57% vs. 43%); much more likely to say Trump angers them (54% to 37%); and significantly less likely to believe that Americans are friendly towards Muslims (44% vs. 65%).

That's probably because American Muslim women, particularly those who wear a hijab, are more readily recognized as Muslims and thus potentially subject to discrimination, experts said.

Since the 9/11 attacks, a number of conservative commentators have condemned American Muslims for not denouncing terrorism strongly enough. In fact, Pew found that not only are Muslim-Americans increasingly anxious about Islamic extremism, they are also more likely than other Americans to say that violence can never be justified.

More than 8 in 10 American Muslims said they were at least somewhat concerned about global extremism in the name of Islam, a 10 percentage point increase from 2011, when Pew conducted a similar study.

Nearly 3 in 4 said there is little if any support for extremism among American Muslims. Just 6% said there is a great deal of support for it, and 11% said there is a "fair amount."

Likewise, more than 75% of American Muslims say violence can never be justified to further a religious, social or political cause. That's compared to 59% of Americans overall who said the same.

Getting DNS issues with Pew so can't get other images to post but:

 

Daria

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Oct 3, 2013
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i'm not surprised. half of our country is turning left and every right-wing policy affects American Muslims
 

orochi91

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Jan 10, 2014
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Right-wing politics has become an existential threat to Muslims in the West, to be frank.

The further they keep shifting to the left and aligning with the Left-wing policies, the better it will be for them in the long-run.

The Left actually tends to give a shit about them and their rights.
 

ponpo

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Aug 22, 2011
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i'm not surprised. half of our country is turning left and every right-wing policy affects American Muslims

I don't know about that. What right-wing policy would make US muslims be more accepting of homosexuality when it is presumably a religious doctrine issue for most?
 

Cerium

Member
Mar 25, 2015
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Well conservatives actually want them dead or deported so that would follow logically.
 

ezrarh

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Apr 22, 2007
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That's awesome.

Modernization is the best and most effective way to stamp out radical Islam.

Muslims in the US tend to be way more educated than the average Muslim throughout the rest of the world. Muslims in the US have higher level of schooling than Christians on average as well. So while this is good news from my perspective, it doesn't say anything about Muslims in other countries.
 

RinsFury

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Jun 2, 2016
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Not surprising. Islamophobia is one of the core beliefs of the Right, they would like to see all the muslim men, women, and children deported, or worse.
 

shockthrill

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Apr 6, 2017
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It seems like American Muslims tend to be more socially/religiously liberal compared to European Muslims, why is this?
 
Dec 2, 2014
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People adapt pretty well. If your surroundings are pleasant and inclusive the people will be like that too. Just takes time.
 
Jul 18, 2016
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Muslims in the US tend to be way more educated than the average Muslim throughout the rest of the world. Muslims in the US have higher level of schooling than Christians on average as well. So while this is good news from my perspective, it doesn't say anything about Muslims in other countries.
These Muslims are not an isolated bloc. Ideas come back and forth between them and family, friends...in their countries of origin. Money flows back too, and the example of succesful liberal Muslims is surely fuel for democratic and liberal ideals in other Muslim majority countries.
It seems like American Muslims tend to be more socially/religiously liberal compared to European Muslims, why is this?
European countries are geographically much closer to the north of Africa and the Middle East, even Pakistan, and there are cultural links due to colonialism. Spain, France, Morocco and Algeria, even Tunisia, see a lot of back and forth movement of people because tjey are very close.
So, between the cultural links and the cheaper travel and proximity, there are MANY more Muslims (in proportion) in Western Europe. Around a 5% of the population.
It's simply easier and cheaper to come here, whereas in the US there is a selection barrier that favours the rich/qualified/well off.
Here in Europe, Moroccans and Algerians and Tunisians are somewhat akin to Mexicans in the US, only they are Muslims too. So, they are victims of racism.
 

MrHoot

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Apr 20, 2014
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Yeah, it's almost like societal influences in the long run will be more proeminent as people are social beings by nature.
 

Sunster

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Aug 28, 2015
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It seems like American Muslims tend to be more socially/religiously liberal compared to European Muslims, why is this?

when you hear about Muslims here they are usually 2nd generation, they grew up here. and when you hear about Muslims in Europe you are usually hearing about 1st generation immigrants.
 

shockthrill

Banned
Apr 6, 2017
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when you hear about Muslims here they are usually 2nd generation, they grew up here. and when you hear about Muslims in Europe you are usually hearing about 1st generation immigrants.

even then, Millenial Muslims in Europe still tend to be conservative compared to American counterparts
 

Sunster

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Aug 28, 2015
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even then, Millenial Muslims in Europe still tend to be conservative compared to American counterparts

2nd generation millenial Muslims? or just millenials? If the former, I'm gonna need a source on that or I just don't believe it.
 

shockthrill

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Apr 6, 2017
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2nd generation millenial Muslims? or just millenials? If the former, I'm gonna need a source on that or I just don't believe it.

i think alot of it has to do with integration

american muslims are better integrated in society, their isn't enclaves as much as they are in europe
 

FZZ

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Jun 5, 2013
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Shout outs to my uncle who got my entire family to be Democrats the moment they stepped on US soil because he knew Republicans never cared about minority rights

He's been a Democrat since the late 70s

I am 90% sure my family would be right wing if it wasn't for him, even my own parents are backwards on a few issues -_-
 

Quixzlizx

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Jul 6, 2006
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when you hear about Muslims here they are usually 2nd generation, they grew up here. and when you hear about Muslims in Europe you are usually hearing about 1st generation immigrants.

That doesn't sound right. Haven't a good percentage of the ISIS-sympathizing attackers in Europe been native-born?
 

Sunster

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Aug 28, 2015
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i think alot of it has to do with integration

american muslims are better integrated in society, their isn't enclaves as much as they are in europe

There are enclaves here though. Deerborn, Michigan for example. A peaceful all American city with a very large Muslim population. I don't think the issues Muslim immigrants in Europe can be simplified to Muslims living near each other. I think it's more complicated than that.

That doesn't sound right. Haven't a good percentage of the ISIS-sympathizing attackers in Europe been native-born?

yes but we hear about immigrants 99.9% of the time. like i said the issues Muslims in Europe have are complicated and I do not have the answers.
 
Oct 2, 2013
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when you hear about Muslims here they are usually 2nd generation, they grew up here. and when you hear about Muslims in Europe you are usually hearing about 1st generation immigrants.

There's also an economic side to this. American first-generation muslims tend to be more highly educated (IIRC muslims are more likely to hold tiertary education degrees then native-borns are), while in Europe they tend to make up the more lower-class immigrants due to proximity and the land connection.
 

Sunster

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Aug 28, 2015
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There's also an economic side to this. American first-generation muslims tend to be more highly educated (IIRC muslims are more likely to hold tiertary education degrees then native-borns are), while in Europe they tend to make up the more lower-class immigrants dude to proximity and the land connection.

yes poverty is great path to radicalization it seems like.
 

Toxi

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May 29, 2013
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I don't know about that. What right-wing policy would make US muslims be more accepting of homosexuality when it is presumably a religious doctrine issue for most?
If you push a demographic towards a political affiliation, they don't just assimilate the ideas that originally attracted them.

For example, people who move to the political right solely because of gun control or abortion tend to also start accepting the right's other economic and social ideas. "Single issue voters" who don't somewhat agree with the majority of the positions of their political affiliation are rare.

When asked the same question in 2014 by Pew, Southern Baptists showed far less growth. This isn't just because they are religious, it's also because Southern Baptists are more likely to be listening to political voices that condemn homosexuality.
 

psyfi

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May 21, 2016
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that might be the only good news to come from the past nine months

I don't know about that. What right-wing policy would make US muslims be more accepting of homosexuality when it is presumably a religious doctrine issue for most?
Huh? Are Muslims significantly more homophobic than Christians? This strikes me as a strange question.
 

ponpo

( ≖‿≖)
Aug 22, 2011
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Tsukuba, Japan
If you push a demographic towards a political affiliation, they don't just assimilate the ideas that originally attracted them.

For example, people who move to the political right solely because of gun control or abortion tend to also start accepting the right's other economic and social ideas. "Single issue voters" who don't somewhat agree with the majority of the positions of their political affiliation are rare.

When asked the same question in 2014 by Pew, Southern Baptists showed far less growth. This isn't just because they are religious, it's also because Southern Baptists are more likely to be listening to political voices that condemn homosexuality.

Makes sense.
 

Xe4

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Aug 1, 2014
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It's definitely good news, although hardly surprising. If it was the opposite, in fact, I would be very surprised (and worried).
 

Mr. Giggles

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Dec 23, 2014
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Yep.

Canadian mooslem here, My community is very liberal and a lot of it is thanks to Harper.

Thing is none of us ever had a problem with him and would also probably have voted for him but the Moment he started his "HERE COME BROWN PEOPLE" Campaign almost everyone in my community started leaning more left.
 

Toxi

Banned
May 29, 2013
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Wonder how those numbers compare to Evangelicals.
Depends on which Evangelicals. See this Pew 2014 survey of American Christian groups on homosexuality. Granted, that was 3 years ago so numbers have changed.

On average...
Most Mormons and evangelical Protestants still say homosexuality should be discouraged by society – in line with the teachings of many of their churches – but 36% of both groups say it should be accepted. Among Mormons, there was a 12-point increase (from 24% to 36%) in acceptance since 2007, and among evangelicals there was a 10-point rise (from 26% to 36%). Jehovah’s Witnesses remain perhaps the most opposed of any U.S religious tradition toward homosexuality, with just 16% saying it should be accepted by society.