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Are "Themed Months" more damaging or helpful to their causes?

DeafTourette

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Since you evidently didn’t read my comment before responding to it, I’ll ask you the question again in the hopes that you will actually try to respond to it this time.

What specific topics about african-american history do you feel aren’t adequately covered?
*The Black Panther Party and their influence/impact beyond California
*influential black artists and scientists (we learn about Einstein, Edison, Pollack, etc)
*the Harlem Renaissance (in my class, we didn't learn ANYTHING about it until our senior year and that was in literature class)
*The after effects of the abolition of slavery and the descent into the Jim Crow laws, Black codes and redlining
*The crack epidemic and the toughening of law enforcement in the black community; disparity in sentencing (crack vs cocaine)

I can't think of anything right now but those are things that would go a long way into fleshing out American history a bit more ... Maybe from 7th grade on...


I didn’t say that it was needed. I said that racial tension, divide, and hatred can (and often does) lead to racism.
If you have any sort of counterpoint to that I’d like to hear it.

My counterpoint is that those things are the RESULT of racism, not the cause. Racism existed in this country long before current PC, SJW, etc stuff came about. The seeds for current racism were sowed long before all of that. It was passed down from parent to child... It was the result of redlining and segregation... It was the result of reservations and gerrymandering... It was the result AND cause of Jim Crow laws and Black codes...

The things you mentioned exist today because this country has NEVER dealt with it's issues honestly. So now we have prejudice, racism and bigotry on every side and I don't know how WE can combat it except to teach our kids to be better than we were. To look at their fellow humans as human, no matter what they look like. To have respect for each life they see or even don't see.

1. No one said you thought that.
2. That subset probably isn’t as big as you want it to be.
That's the thing... I don't WANT it to be big. As a practicing Christian, I want there to be peace.

But you can't have peace until you deal with the ills plaguing us as people (humans)

And I added that part because that's what eventually gets said in these threads talking about race and racism, i.e. "You think all white people are racist!"

The only way we'll have that peace is in the New World... Because we've messed this one up ROYALLY!
 

Whitesnake

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*The Black Panther Party and their influence/impact beyond California
*influential black artists and scientists (we learn about Einstein, Edison, Pollack, etc)
*the Harlem Renaissance (in my class, we didn't learn ANYTHING about it until our senior year and that was in literature class)
*The after effects of the abolition of slavery and the descent into the Jim Crow laws, Black codes and redlining
*The crack epidemic and the toughening of law enforcement in the black community; disparity in sentencing (crack vs cocaine)

I can't think of anything right now but those are things that would go a long way into fleshing out American history a bit more ... Maybe from 7th grade on...
  • I was taught about the Black Panthers
  • What are some black american scientists/inventors that are on the same level of influence as Einstein or Tesla?
  • I wasn’t taught about any artistic movement. If you think they should be taught, that’s fine, but don’t pretend that’s a racial issue.
  • We learned about all of those things. Where did you go to school and when? Are you a backwater boomer? Because nowadays those topics in that period of history are commonly taught.
  • In terms of historical racism by police, we were taught about stop-and-search and about Rodney King. As for the crack epidemic... why would they teach about that?
My counterpoint is that those things are the RESULT of racism, not the cause. Racism existed in this country long before current PC, SJW, etc stuff came about. The seeds for current racism were sowed long before all of that. It was passed down from parent to child... It was the result of redlining and segregation... It was the result of reservations and gerrymandering... It was the result AND cause of Jim Crow laws and Black codes...

The things you mentioned exist today because this country has NEVER dealt with it's issues honestly. So now we have prejudice, racism and bigotry on every side and I don't know how WE can combat it except to teach our kids to be better than we were. To look at their fellow humans as human, no matter what they look like. To have respect for each life they see or even don't see.
So you don’t think people telling each other “(such and such race) is the cause of all of our problems” might cause people to develop racist ideologies? You don’t think low-middleclass black people telling each other “it’s all whitey’s fault” might lead to racism and racial tension? You don’t think that low-middleclass white people telling each other “It’s the blacks’ fault” might do the same?

Obviously history plays a part in it, no one said otherwise. But to claim that there are no modern problems that may lead to people to be prejudiced is just looney.

If you genuinely believe that, there is nothing I can tell you, as I am not qualified to teach you the basic fundamental concepts of Cause and Effect that you lack.
 
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oagboghi2

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Apr 15, 2018
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*The Black Panther Party and their influence/impact beyond California
*influential black artists and scientists (we learn about Einstein, Edison, Pollack, etc)
*the Harlem Renaissance (in my class, we didn't learn ANYTHING about it until our senior year and that was in literature class)
*The after effects of the abolition of slavery and the descent into the Jim Crow laws, Black codes and redlining
*The crack epidemic and the toughening of law enforcement in the black community; disparity in sentencing (crack vs cocaine)
Outside of the after effects of slavery and jim crow example, i don't think a school should be forced to teach those things. You know, there are other things quite frankly more important in America history than crack and harlem poets. If you gave me a choice between that and say understanding world waar 2 and the cold war for example, I'll pick the latter
 

DeafTourette

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Apr 23, 2018
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  • I was taught about the Black Panthers
  • What are some black american scientists/inventors that are on the same level of influence as Einstein or Tesla?
  • I wasn’t taught about any artistic movement. If you think they should be taught, that’s fine, but don’t pretend that’s a racial issue.
  • We learned about all of those things. Where did you go to school and when? Are you a backwater boomer? Because nowadays those topics in that period of history are commonly taught.
  • In terms of historical racism by police, we were taught about stop-and-search and about Rodney King. As for the crack epidemic... why would they teach about that?


So you don’t think people telling each other “(such and such race) is the cause of all of our problems” might cause people to develop racist ideologies? You don’t think low-middleclass black people telling each other “it’s all whitey’s fault” might lead to racism and racial tension? You don’t think that low-middleclass white people telling each other “It’s the blacks’ fault” might do the same?

Obviously history plays a part in it, no one said otherwise. But to claim that there are no modern problems that may lead to people to be prejudiced is just looney.

If you genuinely believe that, there is nothing I can tell you, as I am not qualified to teach you the basic fundamental concepts of Cause and Effect that you lack.
1. I grew up in Mississippi in the 70s and 80s, so maybe my school experience is WAY behind. But we didn't learn about ANY of the stuff you did ... Except for the Harlem Renaissance in the 12th grade (1991-92).

2. Black scientists and inventors?... After 4th grade (because my 5th grade teacher didn't delve into too much slavery era history), we didn't learn much about GWC again. Others could be:

Madame CJ Walker -Hair straightening and care products and the first black millionaire
Patricia Bath - cataract treatments
Lewis Howard Latimer
Fredrick McKinley
Wayne Pickette - the father of the microprocessor

3. The Harlem Renaissance was an artistic movement. It wasn't JUST poetry, music and books... It was a movement! There's so much more to the Harlem Renaissance than just what you think you know about it. Or even what *I* know about it.

4. The crack epidemic is a sore spot in black American history. That time in America (the 1980s) saw a lot of despair in the black communities... Low employment, little money staying in the community, gang violence increasing, etc. The crack epidemic was unique because it didn't just affect the families but entire neighborhoods. It wasn't until the late 80s and early 90s that things started getting better for the communities affected by the epidemic. Unfortunately, we're still feeling the effects of that period of time in small and large ways. I feel that that is an important aspect of black American history that should be covered.

5. Yes, those things are causes of racism and the problems they present. I didn't say they weren't. However, Obama didn't bring back racism because it never went away (yes, there a lot of people who seem to think this... Black, white, etc). The only reason it seems to be on a rise is because we know more about incidents faster and more frequently thanks to the internet. It existed during Bush Jr, Clinton, Bush Sr., Reagan, etc... Humans have a long way to go!

All you have to do is ask me something... I don't think racism is SOLELY on the heels of white people as anyone can be racist/prejudiced. It's what we allow ourselves to learn or not learn that will make things better or worse. We owe it to each other to learn to be better and teach our kids the same.
 

Schrödinger's cat

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Dec 15, 2011
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Article said:
On Wednesday, Marvel star and Boston native Chris Evans also gave the group a piece of his mind.

Brad Pitt has made it clear to the small group of Boston men planning a "Straight Pride" parade they must stop using the actor's name and likeness for their purposes, a source close to the star confirmed to The Hollywood Reporter.

Super Happy Fun America, an apparently serious group "on behalf of the straight community,” was using Pitt's name and image, calling him its mascot for the agenda. "Congratulations to Mr. Pitt for being the face of this important civil rights movement," its site reads.

The group made headlines recently when it sought a permit for a parade in Boston out of spite for June being Pride Month for the LGBTQ community.
Emphasis mine.

Yay diversity.
Yay inclusivity.
Yay equality.

Right?

Article said:
On Wednesday, Marvel star and Boston native Chris Evans also gave the group a piece of his mind.

"Wow! Cool initiative, fellas!! Just a thought, instead of ‘Straight Pride’ parade, how about this: The ‘desperately trying to bury our own gay thoughts by being homophobic because no one taught us how to access our emotions as children’ parade? Whatta ya think? Too on the nose??" Evans tweeted to his more than 12.2 million followers. The actor added, "Wow, the number gay/straight pride parade false equivalencies are disappointing. ... Instead of going immediately to anger(which is actually just fear of what you don’t understand)take a moment to search for empathy and growth."
Oh my.

Article said:
When asked about the "Straight Pride" parade, Boston Mayor Marty Walsh, a Democrat, declined to specifically address it, but instead focused on LGBTQ pride in a statement to The Washington Post, saying, “Every year, Boston hosts our annual Pride Week, where our city comes together to celebrate the diversity, strength and acceptance of our LGBTQ community. This is a special week that represents Boston’s values of love and inclusion, which are unwavering. I encourage everyone to join us in celebration this Saturday for the Pride Parade and in the fight for progress and equality for all.”
Emphasis mine.

Are some more equal than others?
 

Cybrwzrd

Anime waifu panty shots are basically the same thing as paintings of the french baroque masters, if you think about it.
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No as a member of the majority you are not allowed to feel pride, just guilt over your privilege.
So are you telling me the only way I can be proud of who I am is by making myself into some sort of minority?
 

Teletraan1

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I think these themed months of celebration are just implemented as some sort atonement for the sins of the past. All of the groups that get a whole month are victims of some societal oppression. It is just high order virtue signaling.

If any group deserves a whole month to be celebrated it is veterans and those who gave their lives in WW1&2. Without them the world would be a radically different place. As it stands they only get a few days out of the year to be celebrated.

Nobody twerking on a cop car has accomplished 1/1000000000 of what someone who helped defeat the Nazi's has. In recent years It rarely seems to be a celebration of who actually struggled to get to the point where there are no discriminatory laws on the books and now seems like a showcase of selfishness to promote fake oppression by a coddled generation.
 

Whitesnake

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What are white people issues even?
Whether or not sunburn is a form of Environmental Racism.

The comment you responded to was pretty obviously a joke.

For a real answer in South Africa white people are having their property taken from them without warning or reason by the government, and are also being killed for their skin color. For western issues specific to white people, there’s this whole “privilege” narrative that is akin to original sin. While that may not be oppression, I would imagine people would still run with this whole “white people need to do this and that” or “white people should feel guilty about this and that” even if true equality were to be reached.
 
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Schrödinger's cat

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A sobering, and savage, take:


Article said:
The only sense of ‘pride’ I ever felt at being gay came from knowing my forefathers included cultural icons like Oscar Wilde, Quentin Crisp, and Freddie Mercury. Today we’re left with sexless 3D printout Pete Buttigieg, drag-queen story-time in elementary schools, chemically castrated ‘transgender children,’ and an entire generation of privileged little brats addicted to fantasy oppression porn, boycotting chicken sandwiches, and hauling elderly bakers into the Supreme Court. Time to put it away, guys. That’s nothing to be proud of.

As you watch naked, leathery old men with nipple rings waddle down the street, testicles knocking at their knees, or third-rate drag monsters expose their buttholes to crowds of children, just remember that this is not the behavior of an honorable — or even rebellious — people. Everyone knows it, but no one is allowed to say it. It’s hardly even Pride in the Biblical sense. In Christianity, Pride is the first sin, and the most deadly. Pride got Satan expelled from Heaven and Adam and Eve cast out of Paradise. Today’s gay Pride is just corny and mildly uncomfortable.
 

brap

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Jan 9, 2018
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Oh for God's sake, I already want this damned month over with.

I'm here, I'm queer, and I just want to fucking go to work like a normal adult without any of this ginned-up drama.
OMG you're queer??? That's so amazing dude. I am an LGBTQIA+ ally and I will always be here for you! RAINBOW POWER!!
 
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