Baby, It's Cold Outside won't be played on some radio stations, including CBC

Oct 21, 2018
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#52

A corresponding HuffPost article on the film more directly says that the roundup of recent tweets and criticisms of “Rudolph” were posted in jest (“humorous observations”). But that didn’t stop others from seeing the video as an unwarranted attack from liberals.
Donald Trump Jr., for example, drew much attention to the video when he shared it Thursday with the caption, “Liberalism is a disease.”

I love when conserva-shits fall for a troll.
 
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#53

A corresponding HuffPost article on the film more directly says that the roundup of recent tweets and criticisms of “Rudolph” were posted in jest (“humorous observations”). But that didn’t stop others from seeing the video as an unwarranted attack from liberals.
Donald Trump Jr., for example, drew much attention to the video when he shared it Thursday with the caption, “Liberalism is a disease.”

I love when conserva-shits fall for a troll.
Lol, the trolling.

Yeah, it caused one of the original actors to publicly come out and set the record straight.


On Sunday, one of the original voice actors from “Rudolph” attempted to set the record straight on claims that the film is problematic.


In a video sent to TMZ, Corinne Conley, the voice of “Dolly for Sue” who lived on the “Island of Misfit Toys,” said the film is more relevant now than ever given the increase in bullying incidents of late. But it’s important to note, she said, that the bullying is “reconciled” in “Rudolph,” teaching viewers a lesson at the end of the story.


“I just can’t imagine it affecting anyone in a negative way. They must be like Scrooge,” she added, referring to Ebenezer Scrooge, the protagonist of “A Christmas Carol.” “Tell them to watch ‘Scrooge.’ ”

 
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#54
Song isn’t rapey, it’s just not very good.

Yet radio stations will play every rap song about doing pills, smacking hoes, and killing people...

Makes sense.
Think there’s a lot of stations that play both 70 year old Christmas songs and the gangster rap with the ganbanging and the pants sagging and the hippity hopping and the don’t stopping, do you?
 
Oct 21, 2018
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#55
Lol, the trolling.

Yeah, it caused one of the original actors to publicly come out and set the record straight.


On Sunday, one of the original voice actors from “Rudolph” attempted to set the record straight on claims that the film is problematic.


In a video sent to TMZ, Corinne Conley, the voice of “Dolly for Sue” who lived on the “Island of Misfit Toys,” said the film is more relevant now than ever given the increase in bullying incidents of late. But it’s important to note, she said, that the bullying is “reconciled” in “Rudolph,” teaching viewers a lesson at the end of the story.


“I just can’t imagine it affecting anyone in a negative way. They must be like Scrooge,” she added, referring to Ebenezer Scrooge, the protagonist of “A Christmas Carol.” “Tell them to watch ‘Scrooge.’ ”

I’ll keep this in my mind
Song isn’t rapey, it’s just not very good.



Think there’s a lot of stations that play both 70 year old Christmas songs and the gangster rap with the ganbanging and the pants sagging and the hippity hopping and the don’t stopping, do you?
every company that does what I don’t like is in cahoots!
 
Feb 21, 2018
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#57
What gonna go next? Rudolph The Red Nosed Reindeer?
Actually....

Reindeer Boobs Are the New NSFW Holiday Trend You Need in Your Life

Meet reindeer boobs, the oh-so-flattering and photogenic look that’s three-parts cozy, one-part nippy, and 100-percent guaranteed to make at least one person uncomfortably clear their throat (what up, grandma). Because the look involves taking your favorite—or actually probably least favorite—holiday sweater, cutting a hole in it, pulling your exposed breast through the hole, and then decorating your boob to like a reindeer.







Yes, I know, your first thought is probably, “Oh my god; I get to play with googly eyes and glitter?!” and I’m here to tell you YES! The world—and your boob—is your oyster, and you can decorate and display your nips however you want, whether that’s with sparkly pompoms, stick-on jewels, a crocheted nipple cover (which is dedication, honestly), and, of course, some felt ears.
 
Dec 3, 2018
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#59
I've never liked that song, and always found it creepy. The guy just keeps badgering the woman until she finally gives in.

It doesn't seem especially empowering to me, either. It's just another reminder of the good old double standard that still exists to a degree.
 
Oct 24, 2017
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#61
I've never liked that song, and always found it creepy. The guy just keeps badgering the woman until she finally gives in.

It doesn't seem especially empowering to me, either. It's just another reminder of the good old double standard that still exists to a degree.
No it is a playfully back and forth an the only reason why she does not want to stay with him are the social standards at the time. In the end SHE decides on her own and does not care what others might think about her. And all for the person she loves.
 
Likes: hargwood
Oct 21, 2018
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#63
Why are you so aggressive all the time?
I’m a very upset person deeply affected by years of mental and physical abuse by both personal circumstance, and societal disenfrancement.

I also get really mad when teachers pull trans students out of bathrooms while they are on the toilet
 
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#64
I’m a very upset person deeply affected by years of mental and physical abuse by both personal circumstance, and societal disenfrancement.

I also get really mad when teachers pull trans students out of bathrooms while they are on the toilet

I don't know what I expected but I didn't think it was going to get so real.
 
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Dec 3, 2018
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#65
No it is a playfully back and forth an the only reason why she does not want to stay with him are the social standards at the time. In the end SHE decides on her own and does not care what others might think about her. And all for the person she loves.
I've already read other people's interpretations of the song. I shared mine. I've been hearing the damned song every year since it was recorded. I didn't like it then, and I don't like it now. I've always found it creepy. I don't like pushy people who won't take no for an answer, and don't have much respect for people who lack the self-awareness/backbone to stand their ground and not allow themselves to be cajoled into something they don't want to do.

You are, of course, entitled to your own interpretation and opinion, as am I. If that creepy song is never broadcast again, I won't miss it.
 
Oct 24, 2017
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#66
I've already read other people's interpretations of the song. I shared mine. I've been hearing the damned song every year since it was recorded. I didn't like it then, and I don't like it now. I've always found it creepy. I don't like pushy people who won't take no for an answer, and don't have much respect for people who lack the self-awareness/backbone to stand their ground and not allow themselves to be cajoled into something they don't want to do.

You are, of course, entitled to your own interpretation and opinion, as am I. If that creepy song is never broadcast again, I won't miss it.
There is nothing pushy about it. You can even hear it in their voices. It is a playfully back and forth like a couple does. And they have the utterly respect they or better she is just still bound by social norms back in the day. That is the only pressure she has to endure. She NEVER wanted not to stay at his place.

You interpretation is based on shitty ideologies that want to see everything as problematic and evil.
 
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#68
Maybe my understanding of English language is completely off, afterall, it is not my native language, but if I read the text, it appears to me as a battle inside the woman singer who actually wants to stay, but at the same time thinks about responsibilities the society and her environment puts on her. I mean, OK, it could be seen as her looking for excuses to go, if you just take a few lines of it, but in particular the "what's in the drink" line suggests that she wants to stay, emotionally, yet thinks it would be more rational to leave, similarly the "maybe just a cigarette more". The man's part in the song may be a bit clumsy, but I imagine it is supposed to be a romantic meeting between a young developing couple, so it is actually more realistic than a less clumsy way of talking. I cannot see the harassment or rape connections here.
 
Jun 20, 2018
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#69
Maybe my understanding of English language is completely off, afterall, it is not my native language, but if I read the text, it appears to me as a battle inside the woman singer who actually wants to stay, but at the same time thinks about responsibilities the society and her environment puts on her. I mean, OK, it could be seen as her looking for excuses to go, if you just take a few lines of it, but in particular the "what's in the drink" line suggests that she wants to stay, emotionally, yet thinks it would be more rational to leave, similarly the "maybe just a cigarette more". The man's part in the song may be a bit clumsy, but I imagine it is supposed to be a romantic meeting between a young developing couple, so it is actually more realistic than a less clumsy way of talking. I cannot see the harassment or rape connections here.
This whole "lets now check the lyrics maybe there is something to it" thing is a fallacy on its own because if it actually would matter you wouldn't even have rap anymore lol
 
Dec 3, 2018
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#71
There is nothing pushy about it. You can even hear it in their voices. It is a playfully back and forth like a couple does. And they have the utterly respect they or better she is just still bound by social norms back in the day. That is the only pressure she has to endure. She NEVER wanted not to stay at his place.

You interpretation is based on shitty ideologies that want to see everything as problematic and evil.
Good to know. Clearly, you have me all figured out. Whatever would I do without you to 'splain the cultural conditions around a song I grew up with and point out my shitty evil-seeking ideologies?

PS - I don't give a flying fuck about ideologies. I just know how the song has always affected me. There's nothing that you or anyone else can say that's going to change that.
 
Oct 24, 2017
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#72
Good to know. Clearly, you have me all figured out. Whatever would I do without you to 'splain the cultural conditions around a song I grew up with and point out my shitty evil-seeking ideologies?

PS - I don't give a flying fuck about ideologies. I just know how the song has always affected me. There's nothing that you or anyone else can say that's going to change that.
The important thing is the cultural aspect when this song was written. Not when you grew up with. You need the context to material you listen, watch or read to understand the meaning etc. Actually this song was very progressive and empowerment for women during this time.

If you want to accept it or not of course it is your decision but you growing up with under which influences etc. is not really important neither are mine.
 
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Dec 3, 2018
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#73
The important thing is the cultural aspect when this song was written. Not when you grew up with. You need the context to material you listen, watch or read to understand the meaning etc. Actually this song was very progressive and empowerment for women during this time.

If you want to accept it or not of course it is your decision but you growing up with under which influences etc. is not really important neither are mine.
You somehow seemed to have missed the part where I said that I remember when the song was first recorded and released. I was alive at that time, and living in that culture. It was neither progressive nor empowering, but did illustrate the double standard that existed at the time and still does to a degree today. Oh, and that women are pushovers who don't know their own minds and just need some convincing.

But again, you are of course free to think what you like. I'm done here.
 
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#74
You somehow seemed to have missed the part where I said that I remember when the song was first recorded and released. I was alive at that time, and living in that culture.
It was played / released 1949 for the first time, 69 years ago, adding a couple of years, because you remember that time, you are at least 77. That means you are retired. We have found the person who has to make all the missing OTs :).
 
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Oct 24, 2017
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#75
You somehow seemed to have missed the part where I said that I remember when the song was first recorded and released. I was alive at that time, and living in that culture. It was neither progressive nor empowering, but did illustrate the double standard that existed at the time and still does to a degree today. Oh, and that women are pushovers who don't know their own minds and just need some convincing.

But again, you are of course free to think what you like. I'm done here.
Wait so you are over 70 already? Apologize if this is really the case. This song was first recorded in 1944. I hope you know this.

During the 1940s, when Hollywood celebrities attended parties, they were expected to perform. In 1944, Frank Loesser wrote "Baby, It's Cold Outside" for his wife, Lynn Garland, and himself to sing at a housewarming party in New York City at the Navarro Hotel. They sang the song to indicate to guests that it was time to leave. Loesser often introduced himself as the "evil of two Loessers" because of the role he played in the song.[1]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baby,_It's_Cold_Outside#cite_note-SLoesser-1
 
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Jun 13, 2017
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#77
You somehow seemed to have missed the part where I said that I remember when the song was first recorded and released. I was alive at that time, and living in that culture. It was neither progressive nor empowering, but did illustrate the double standard that existed at the time and still does to a degree today. Oh, and that women are pushovers who don't know their own minds and just need some convincing.

But again, you are of course free to think what you like. I'm done here.

A film made in 1949 has a musical that shows both the man trying to convince the woman to stay and then a woman trying to get a man to stay, I think they knew it had nothing to do with rape, and everything to do with how others would see it.
 
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Dec 3, 2018
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#78
Yes, I'm old and retired. I also know when the song was recorded.

Your kind apology is accepted and appreciated.

As for thread abandonment, I was actually expecting I'd be done here, thus the comment. Since a few of you addressed me, I'm responding.
 
Dec 3, 2018
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#79
Please pardon the double post. I'd added this to the previous post, but by the time I'd finished, the 5-minute timer had elapsed:

Edit: I'm not sure why people continue to insist on "educating" me. I'm very aware of the origins of the song. My feelings about it/opinion of it are not uninformed, and not something I just invented. I've held them for a very long time and, despite having read and considered all of the other prior comments in this thread - and others, in other places - they haven't changed and aren't changing.

That's really all I have to say about this topic.
 
Dec 3, 2018
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#83
Or just friendly ribbing since that paragraph was ripe for picking.
If you say so, I'll take your word for it.

I still don't much like it. I feel like what's going on may be an attempt to re-interpret the song and justify it (and get back at/make fun of those damned feminists/SJWs). I also acknowledge that other people my age and older might have a different take on it than I do. As I said in the beginning, I only know how I personally (and my parents and siblings) felt about it, and we all thought it was creepy. Shrug.
 
Dec 3, 2013
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#85
If you say so, I'll take your word for it.

I still don't much like it. I feel like what's going on may be an attempt to re-interpret the song and justify it (and get back at/make fun of those damned feminists/SJWs). I also acknowledge that other people my age and older might have a different take on it than I do. As I said in the beginning, I only know how I personally (and my parents and siblings) felt about it, and we all thought it was creepy. Shrug.
And that is precisely what is being said about those viewing the song through the modern lens of society.

It will always be "creepy" in both the era it came out (since how a woman conducted herself in society was a thing), and, how one views it through the lens of today with their interpretation.
 
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Oct 24, 2017
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#89
Yeah, I expected as much here.

Apparently, one can't have a well-formed, carefully considered opinion without being accused of something by the peanut gallery.
The problem is that no one even believed you are 70+ years old. Especially when you talk more like a young adult. I am sorry but I have never seen some old person talking like that. kind of refreshing. So yes given your age I can respect your opinion and move on. I am sorry for attacking you.
 
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Oct 21, 2018
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#91
This is dumb, but what people need to understand is that the people call for things like this will never be satisfied. They will keep looking for things that can be viewed as unsavory and keep erasing parts of American culture.
Well there are a lot of really shitty parts of American history not that I have that much of a problem with the song being played
 
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#93
And that is precisely what is being said about those viewing the song through the modern lens of society.

It will always be "creepy" in both the era it came out (since how a woman conducted herself in society was a thing), and, how one views it through the lens of today with their interpretation.
The reason I find it creepy has nothing to do with the woman's conduct or social expectations, but the man's. He badgers and badgers and badgers her until she gives in. It feeds/fed certain stereotypes of both parties, neither of which are very complimentary. And it exemplifies the good old "no means yes" trope, which benefits no one.

How one interprets it depends, I think, on one's assumptions going in.

If one assumes that the woman really wants to stay, then social expectations are blamed for her initial reluctance.

If one assumes that she meant what she said in the first place (no), it comes across as him continuing to push until she relents.
 
Dec 3, 2013
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#94
The reason I find it creepy has nothing to do with the woman's conduct or social expectations, but the man's. He badgers and badgers and badgers her until she gives in. It feeds/fed certain stereotypes of both parties, neither of which are very complimentary. And it exemplifies the good old "no means yes" trope, which benefits no one.

How one interprets it depends, I think, on one's assumptions going in.

If one assumes that the woman really wants to stay, then social expectations are blamed for her initial reluctance.

If one assumes that she meant what she said in the first place (no), it comes across as him continuing to push until she relents.
And that is precisely why we are having this discussion. It is all a matter of perspective.

The hypocrisy is quite apt though, considering what other forms of music/lyrics is being played by these very airwave owners.
 
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Oct 21, 2018
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#95
And that is precisely why we are having this discussion. It is all a matter of perspective.

The hypocrisy is quite apt though, considering what other forms of music/lyrics is being played by these very airwave owners.
If you make a rule about no fighting in the house on Christmas does it make you a hypocrite if you fight every other day? These are all Christmas music channels.
 
Dec 3, 2013
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#97
If you make a rule about no fighting in the house on Christmas does it make you a hypocrite if you fight every other day? These are all Christmas music channels.
What are you talking about? These are not all "Christmas Channels". They are just playing holiday music this time of year. Especially the Cleveland WDOK-FM which calls itself "adult contemporary", owned by CBS (just like most of the radio stations in the US). Hell, they (CBS) even hosted Howard Stern of all people until he left due to FCC pressures (not due to CBS).

Edit: I bet you they play this song with zero issues though on that "adult contemporary" station...

 
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Oct 21, 2018
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#99
I read your reply 3 times and I have no clue what you're talking about. Can you try again?
White women are fighting battles against sexism from white men, and black women are fighting battles against sexism from black men, but people like you ignore those black women liberals because it doesn’t fit your narrative. We are constantly criticizing how sexist rap and black men are to us.
 
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White women are fighting battles against sexism from white men, and black women are fighting battles against sexism from black men, but people like you ignore those black women liberals because it doesn’t fit your narrative. We are constantly criticizing how sexist rap and black men are to us.
Got it. Thanks for that, TayTay. Keep fighting that fight!

It's not that your fight doesn't fit the narrative. The image was a parody of the absurdilty of the reaction to a classic Christmas song, while some of those same people have no problem with aggressive and actually misogynistic rap songs.