Baby, It's Cold Outside won't be played on some radio stations, including CBC

Oct 24, 2017
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White women are fighting battles against sexism from white men, and black women are fighting battles against sexism from black men, but people like you ignore those black women liberals because it doesn’t fit your narrative. We are constantly criticizing how sexist rap and black men are to us.
Who is we and who even cares about it? I have not seen any video how sexist rap music is because if they do this they will create a outrage from black twitter and co which they do not want. It is much easier to blame withe people for everything these days.

None or less many people find nothing sexist in this song. It is quite the opposite (Not all agree on the empowerment but many do) So comparing this to rap in which they call women bitches and whores does not even work here.
 
Oct 21, 2018
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Who is we and who even cares about it? I have not seen any video how sexist rap music is because if they do this they will create a outrage from black twitter and co which they do not want. It is much easier to blame withe people for everything these days.

None or less many people find nothing sexist in this song. It is quite the opposite (Not all agree on the empowerment but many do) So comparing this to rap in which they call women bitches and whores does not even work here.

https://www.billboard.com/amp/artic...ter-rant-sexism-female-rappers-russ-interview

https://www.newsweek.com/sexual-harassment-hollywood-eve-rapper-hip-hop-692966?amp=1

Try again.
 
Dec 3, 2013
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I do not think he is arguing against people speaking out, I think he is saying some of those very people who pioneer getting this song removed, do not dare attempt it to certain rap songs and the like. In fact, they probably twerk to them drunk on their Hypnotic, lol.

Hell, anecdotal, but I would bet we know a lot of girls who are decree "feminists" yet lose their shit when "this my jam" comes on the radio from the newest hip-hop hotness degrading women.

A friend of mine is just like this. Feminist who would probably speak out about this holiday song (jump on the bandwagon), but man, when Juvenile's 'Back that azz up' comes up on the playlist, she loses her shit. Partially my fault since it is still one of the dopest beats still till this day.
 
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Likes: Dunki
Oct 21, 2018
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I do not think he is arguing against people speaking out, I think he is saying some of those very people who pioneer getting this song removed, do not dare attempt it to certain rap songs and the like. In fact, they probably twerk to them drunk on their Hypnotic, lol.

Hell, anecdotal, but I would bet we know a lot of girls who are decree "feminists" yet lose their shit when "this my jam" comes on the radio from the newest hip-hop hotness degrading women.

A friend of mine is just like this. Feminist who would probably speak out about this holiday song (jump on the bandwagon), but man, when Juvenile's 'Back that azz up' comes up on the playlist, she loses her shit. Partially my fault since it is still one of the dopest beats still till this day.
As a black woman, I’m perfectly willing to speak out against the patronizing bigotry of low expectations, and the ignoring of the abuse again black women by white liberals, including white women. For example, we hate Lena Dunham. We call her white liberal’s Kanye.
 
Likes: DeepEnigma
I want to respect how people feel and if the song does creep people out and bring up negative life experiences then I’m glad those people won’t have to hear the song as much.

I don’t think the intention of the song was to be predatory. That being said, I can see how by today’s standards and in today’s context it can definitely appear that way.

I’m the kind of naive idiot who thinks “we can make everyone happy,” and I’d like to think there’s some middle ground here somewhere though I’m not sure where it is.


Off topic here but I can’t help but think of this scene every time the rap music comparisons come up:

 
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Aug 30, 2018
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I want to respect how people feel and if the song does creep people out and bring up negative life experiences then I’m glad those people won’t have to hear the song as much.

I don’t think the intention of the song was to be predatory. That being said, I can see how by today’s standards and in today’s context it can definitely appear that way.

I’m the kind of naive idiot who thinks “we can make everyone happy,” and I’d like to think there’s some middle ground here somewhere though I’m not sure where it is.


Off topic here but I can’t help but think of this scene every time the rap music comparisons come up:

The song is a staple in Christmas playlists. It's likely 99% of people have positive feeling about the song, so why erase it to please a small minority of complainers?
 
Nov 13, 2016
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I'm offended by the endless tide of Michael Buble and Justin Bieber songs on the radio this time of year, but I just change the channel or turn the radio off when they come on.

Living in a free society means getting confronted with things you don't agree with. We should learn to develop a shield for those times.
 
Well there are a lot of really shitty parts of American history not that I have that much of a problem with the song being played

True but if we cleanse everything that can be perceived or has some aspects we have progressed past the loss will be greater than the gain.

You have said yourself that black woman have spoken out against their depiction in rap. Would you be ok with the removal of early works too edit out misogyny from the history of the genre?
 
Oct 21, 2018
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True but if we cleanse everything that can be perceived or has some aspects we have progressed past the loss will be greater than the gain.

You have said yourself that black woman have spoken out against their depiction in rap. Would you be ok with the removal of early works too edit out misogyny from the history of the genre?
You got me there.
 
May 16, 2005
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Lul, hope they don’t play any rap songs either.

Apart from that, how did this song become a holiday song in the US? It’s not particularly catchy and seems to have little to do with the holiday season at all. As a german, I never ever heard of it until now.
 
Dec 3, 2018
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The problem is that no one even believed you are 70+ years old. Especially when you talk more like a young adult. I am sorry but I have never seen some old person talking like that. kind of refreshing. So yes given your age I can respect your opinion and move on. I am sorry for attacking you.
I'm not quite sure how someone my age is expected to write. I'm fairly educated, and worked in a professional field. I was a geek before it was cool - I remember my delight at seeing my very first video game (Pac-Man) at a college reunion, and was middle-aged when I got my first computer (a Commodore 64). I'm still in pretty good shape (all things considered), and am able to manage the arthritis pain for the most part, though I might be seeking a knee replacement soon.

Anyway, it was kind of you to apologize.
 
Likes: Dunki
Aug 30, 2018
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Guys there’s plenty of sexist music that isn’t rap.

Why the emphasis on that genre I wonder
Because it's the genre with the most egregious examples of sexism and violence. Case in point...

"So we could never be a couple hun / F*ck love / All I got for hoes is hard d*ck and bubblegum." - Big L

"Bitches ain't sh*t but hoes and tricks / Lick on these nuts and suck the d*ck." - Snoop Dogg

"Once again I gotta punch a bitch in her sh*t / I'm icy bitch, don't look at my wrist / Because if you do, I might blind you bitch." - Jasper Dolphin of Odd Future

"My little sister's birthday / She'll remember me / For a gift I had ten of my boys take her virginity." - Bizarre
 
Dec 3, 2018
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And that is precisely why we are having this discussion. It is all a matter of perspective.

The hypocrisy is quite apt though, considering what other forms of music/lyrics is being played by these very airwave owners.
I'm not terribly inclined to accuse others of hypocrisy, since I don't know the criteria used to establish their playlists. There are a lot of songs denied airtime, and really only a few out of the huge population of recorded music that is ever played. I would agree that there are a lot of songs on the airwaves that are offensive/insulting. I also remember Meatloaf's Paradise By The Dashboard Lights, which some people didn't much like when it was released, and for similar reasons.

The other thing we need to remember is that different stations have different audiences/demographics. I don't listen to rap, though I enjoy R&B. The best thing any radio station can do is try to appeal to their target audience in whatever way works for them.
 
Likes: DeepEnigma
Oct 24, 2017
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I'm not quite sure how someone my age is expected to write. I'm fairly educated, and worked in a professional field. I was a geek before it was cool - I remember my delight at seeing my very first video game (Pac-Man) at a college reunion, and was middle-aged when I got my first computer (a Commodore 64). I'm still in pretty good shape (all things considered), and am able to manage the arthritis pain for the most part, though I might be seeking a knee replacement soon.

Anyway, it was kind of you to apologize.
The normal 70+ yeah olds I know at least in Germany would not take with a more modern language and definitions. It is a new thing for me and therefore refreshing^^
I also wish you the best of health especially with age it can get really tough I see it now with my mother who is almost 70 now.
 
Likes: FuddyDuddy
May 4, 2005
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If you make a rule about no fighting in the house on Christmas does it make you a hypocrite if you fight every other day? These are all Christmas music channels.
I think yes, it is hypocritical. Creating an artificial no-fighting room is creating unnecessary tensions and if you usually fight all the time, just not doing this over a stretch of three days for outside reasons will onyl escalate the base problems, because everyone just "collects" their frustrations. It would be preferrable to try to find solutions to the most common issues that lead to all the fighting.

Guys there’s plenty of sexist music that isn’t rap.

Why the emphasis on that genre I wonder
Two reasons for that:
1. Rap has a pretty strong tendency to offend with sexism and celebrating outlaw behaviour. It is not true for every song, but in recent time, the most egregious examples in popular culture are from rap. Of course, we have the far-right rock scene, but those songs and bands are hardly mainstream and are not played on the radio, so they would be off topic here.
2. Rap, as something perceived by US-oriented social justice activists as particularly identifying element for black culture has an elevated position among the same group where the complaints about this song is coming from.

Also, personally, I need to admit to a third point:
3. Rap is (next to Schlager) the genre I dispise the most, so I might also be biased against it.

@FuddyDuddy I have to concur with @Dunki: It is pretty refreshing to have someone your age stay mentally flexible, adapt to modern technology and keep up with ever-changing debates. I can only hope I can keep an open mind and keep up with modern debate forms when I approach your age.
 
Oct 21, 2018
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You guys are disingenuous in your deflections to rap, and I say this as someone who:

1. Has no problem with this Christmas song.
2. Criticizes rap frequently.

You only bring it up as a reaction, when you can call liberals hypocrites. You say nothing about all the black women fighting against sexism in hip hop. You say nothing about that being the real reason it doesn’t get talk about, is because the issues concerning black Woman do not get talked about.

You can be correct but still making a very poor argument people aren’t gonna listen to, if you keep framing it a certain way.

In other words, it sounds like concern trolling.
 
Jan 31, 2008
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Sometimes I include in my prayers a thanks to God for not being born a shitlib. It must really suck to walk around looking for shit to be offended by all the time.

The great irony of this is that these sexed-up generations, with the most libertine attitudes, are the least in touch with love, sex, and romance in their proper forms. By embracing depravity they make themselves eunuchs.
 
Feb 21, 2018
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Well the SJW's have something in common with the Muslim Brootherhood.

Zumwalt: How ‘Baby, It’s Cold Outside’ Triggered the Godfather of the Muslim Brotherhood

Qutb was an Egyptian educator who arrived in Greeley, Colorado, in 1948, at age 42, to study America’s educational system. Greeley was a small, religiously conservative town which, consistent with Muslim beliefs, prohibited alcohol. Reclusive Qutb – a lifetime bachelor – was invited to a church social to welcome him to the community. After dinner, the lights were turned down low and dancing music played for the young people. But when the then-popular song “Baby, It’s Cold Outside” played and dancers cozied up to their partners, Qutb wrote, he became enraged.

Qutb would later describe what he witnessed at the church social as follows:

The dance hall convulsed to the tunes on the gramophone and was full of bounding feet and seductive legs [keep in mind Qutb is describing women who were wearing the long dresses of the era – extending down to their ankles – claiming them to be “seductive.”] Arms circled waists, lips met lips, chests met chests, and the atmosphere was full of passion.
As an Islamist, Qutb strongly believed women should remain fully covered. Wearing sleeveless dresses of the 1940s, these women, much to Qutb’s shock, left the skin of their arms exposed. He believed they should act discreetly and remain separate and apart from males. While managing to contain his anger that evening, this then little-known Islamic activist used what he witnessed that evening to write about American hedonism and the need for Islam to save the world.

In 1953, after returning to Egypt, Qutb joined the Muslim Brotherhood. His prolific Islamic fundamentalist writings soon made him that organization’s “intellectual godfather.” As a pillar of the Islamist movement in Egypt and advocate of violent jihad, Qutb eventually became known as “the father of modern Islamist fundamentalism” and the foremost Islamic thinker of his time. However, his desperate efforts to make Egypt an Islamic society ruled by Islamic law resulted in President Gamal Abdel Nassar orderingQutb’s execution in 1966.