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BBC stars' pay has been revealed in annual report.

mclem

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The other two present on Dancing With the Stars, and also present other programming for the BBC as part of their talent contracts - Craig doesn't so much as he still does quite a lot of stage choreography work and he's pretty busy with that.

Len, yes, but I don't think I've seen Bruno head all that much programming? I suppose he's been a Would I Lie To You guest.

She's on the list, she just doesn't do that much work any more for the BBC because she spends a lot of her time working for BT Sport (for no doubt a vastly higher hourly rate) and hence the "headline" figure is low enough the press didn't read down that far.

I suppose one factor that perverts my viewpoint is that for the sports I'm interested in, she tends to be there - Olympic coverage being particularly fresh-in-mind.

Wonder if she might be low enough to be off the list in a non-Olympic year?
 

MudoSkills

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Best paid actor is a man who has been on the same show for 30 years and still couldn't act his way out a of a wet paper bag.

Fantastic.
 

JonnyDBrit

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Times have changed, we have on-demand services making those projects possible now. There is a ton of choice already in entertainment. While I also enjoy some BBC shows, they should be either funded independent (as is being done through their Worldwide service already) or just go commercial. I see no reason to have taxpayers fund entertainment in the current tv landscape anymore.

Well for a start most of those on-demand services aren't rooted in a British context, talent pool, or even target demographic. And yes I am going to invoke the argument of a British context for the British Broadcasting Corporation. Netflix is not gonna provide content like Coast - a series dedicated to the British coastline, not just a general marine based documentary (and much of Netflix's catalogue in that regard is lifted from the BBC anyway) - as it just doesn't fit for them.

As a public service, it has duties to the public, and leniency from existing systems, that other broadcasters and services simply do not. No, Netflix and Amazon Prime are not good enough substitutes, no matter how much you try to put things in abstract.
 

mclem

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Best paid actor is a man who has been on the same show for 30 years and still couldn't act his way out a of a wet paper bag.

To be fair, there's clearly a longevity factor in there, given that Ian Beale's right up there too!
 

RedSparrows

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Well for a start most of those on-demand services aren't rooted in a British context, talent pool, or even target demographic. And yes I am going to invoke the argument of a British context for the British Broadcasting Corporation. Netflix is not gonna provide content like Coast - a series dedicated to the British coastline, not just a general marine based documentary (and much of Netflix's catalogue in that regard is lifted from the BBC anyway) - as it just doesn't fit for them.

As a public service, it has duties to the public, and leniency from existing systems, that other broadcasters and services simply do not. No, Netflix and Amazon Prime are not good enough substitutes, no matter how much you try to put things in abstract.

Netflix produce a shit load of cool stuff, but yeah, hello ever more US-centric television if the BBC is dismantled etc. BBC Four and 6 Music alone are worth my £75 or whatever I play split with my GF, and Sky can get tae fuck.
 

RangerX

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Dec 12, 2011
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Nicky Campbell makes between 400-450k! I like the guy but I don't even know that many people who listen to him or watch him on the big questions.
 

mclem

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He took over the BBC's most popular radio slot and increased the audience share, he basically has carte blanche now even if Top Gear was a disaster.

Actually, I wonder what Terry got during his R2 Breakfast heyday, on that note?
 

Mindwipe

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Len, yes, but I don't think I've seen Bruno head all that much programming? I suppose he's been a Would I Lie To You guest.

He turns up to the opening of a book on panel and game shows!

:)

(One other thing that isn't taken account of in these figures is that people who are paid by the BBC are sometimes hired out to commercial indies and the money recouped, but that sort of arrangement is too complicated for these lists and ignored despite the fact it makes people significantly better value for money. That may (may, I dunno, also may be excluded) be one of the reasons for Linekar, as he works MOTD for NBC too.

Presenter contracts are weird and bespoke things, and often the business relationships underpinning them are too complicated to really judge. Which is one of the reasons the BBC never released these figures historically TBH.
 

ClosingADoor

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You literally claimed that UK Comedy was being made by on-demand services now so there was no need for any public service funding.

They aren't. None have been made in recent times. You're entitled to your own opinions, not your own facts.
It was a bit unclear. I meant that we do not need government funded entertainment shows anymore, since we have a lot of options already, including on-demand that is investing in quality shows lately and does experimenting. So with that added to the commercial broadcasters, I see little need for public tv to fulfill this role.

If none have been made by not even the BBC, then I also don't get the complaint, since if even they aren't making it, there seems to be little demand for it at the moment.

You think the BBC should literally just do news, current affairs and documentaries. Presumably because you secretly feel that would quickly bring about their demise as they would lose most of thier viewers.

They were created on the proviso that they would Inform, Educate and Entertain, and that hasn't changed. If you don't like it, don't pay for it.
I do indeed think that any public broadcaster should limit itself to those things and have adequate funding to fulfill that role. Fine to disagree of course, just stating my opinion on public tv like this.

Netflix produce a shit load of cool stuff, but yeah, hello ever more US-centric television if the BBC is dismantled etc. BBC Four and 6 Music alone are worth my £75 or whatever I play split with my GF, and Sky can get tae fuck.
Netflix has more and more international subscribers. I expect their productions to follow that trend.
 

tomtom94

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Actually, I wonder what Terry got during his R2 Breakfast heyday, on that note?

At one point it was leaked that he earned £800k a year for that slot, plus before he retired he was getting £150k per Eurovision. So quite a bit cheaper than Evans.

Wogan said:
If you do the maths, factoring in my eight million listeners, I cost the BBC about 2p a fortnight. I think I'm cheap at the price'

This could apply to so many of the people on this list.
 

MudoSkills

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I'd also like to highlight Naga Munchetty, doing pretty well at £150k-£200k for reading an autocue and not having any personality.
 

mclem

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He turns up to the opening of a book on panel and game shows!

:)

(One other thing that isn't taken account of in these figures is that people who are paid by the BBC are sometimes hired out to commercial indies and the money recouped, but that sort of arrangement is too complicated for these lists and ignored despite the fact it makes people significantly better value for money. That may (may, I dunno, also may be excluded) be one of the reasons for Linekar, as he works MOTD for NBC too.

That's a very good point - I think there's situations where other countries have had our (no longer BBC, but historically so) F1 commentary, too.

On which note, ever so slightly surprised Aggers is the only TMS person to make the grade, despite (or perhaps *because of*?) the sheer international reach of the cricket coverage.

One other thing that strikes me while I'm wittering on is how few people appear in the sports list; sure, there's the headline big-number figures, and that's fair enough, but there's really not *that* many around the lower regions. Lots of people bubbling under?
 

mclem

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At one point it was leaked that he earned £800k a year for that slot, plus before he retired he was getting £150k per Eurovision. So quite a bit cheaper than Evans.

Actually about on a par with Norton, which rather makes sense.

I'd also like to highlight Naga Munchetty, doing pretty well at £150k-£200k for reading an autocue and not having any personality.

Worth highlighting that she'd have got a paycheck for that year's Strictly as well (as, presumably, would Tameka Empson)
 

faridmon

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Good of them for earning so much. Some of them are reallly good at what they are doing and I don't mind them earning that much.

The only thing that pisses me off is ow much Alan Shearer makes for just spouting nonsense
 

Browny

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Aug 27, 2013
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I'm glad Mark Radcliffe is getting paid. He was a huge part of my music life growing up, and I'm still listening to old shows of his as well as his 6 Music show.
 

Preezy

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This bashing of Alan Shearer is so 2015. He's really upped his punditry game in recent years, gone are the days of "if they score a goal and stop the other team scoring, they'll win!".
 

mclem

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I'm glad Mark Radcliffe is getting paid. He was a huge part of my music life growing up, and I'm still listening to old shows of his as well as his 6 Music show.
But not Maconie, interestingly.
 

Daffy Duck

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Tim Roth on 150- 199k? Wut?

I'd also like to highlight Naga Munchetty, doing pretty well at £150k-£200k for reading an autocue and not having any personality.

God, I hate seeing and hearing her on BBC Breakfast in the morning. Like you say, she is just wooden.

This bashing of Alan Shearer is so 2015. He's really upped his punditry game in recent years, gone are the days of "if they score a goal and stop the other team scoring, they'll win!".

Agreed, I have no real complaints about anything football related on the BBC, aside from Jonathan Pearce on MoTD.
 

Mascot

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Pay bracket: £400,000 - £449,999
Alan Shearer


Jesus wept. He's the worst pundit in the known universe. The dictionary definition of boring.

I'd also like to highlight Naga Munchetty, doing pretty well at £150k-£200k for reading an autocue and not having any personality.
Come on..! Condescending smugness is a personality trait.
 
Jun 26, 2012
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This bashing of Alan Shearer is so 2015. He's really upped his punditry game in recent years, gone are the days of "if they score a goal and stop the other team scoring, they'll win!".

He's better than he was, but he still can't extemporise to save his life. Once he runs out of pre-prepared things to say, he falls apart: "And, er... he really er... should do better there".

Still, at least Robbie Savage didn't make the list eh? I don't think the BBC would be able to survive that!
 

JonnyDBrit

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Netflix has more and more international subscribers. I expect their productions to follow that trend.

Until such is actually the case, there is no point putting the cart before the horse in claiming 'government funded entertainment is no longer necessary'. Even if it's not necessary, it's nice to have, considering the BBC put out Merlin three years before HBO put the world on a tv fantasy craze, which even in the aftermath of, few others have really tried to create similar content. Or how about Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell? That particular blend of historical fantasy is not one you will easily find elsewhere.
 

MontyBrown

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Oct 10, 2016
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Mayo making bank but no Kermode, poor dude.

Most of these are lower than I would expect to be honest.
 

Zaph

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Good, if commercial tv can do these programs, let them. Government paid tv should only be for things like news, so there is no commercial influence on news coverage.

If a show is popular, it might as well be on commercial tv.

Couldn't disagree more. BBC should be able to operate across all forms of programming, so long as there is a balance.

If the BBC only focused on "things like news" they never would have had the need to put 8 years of legal efforts into VoD content licensing for iPlayer - which laid the contractual framework now used throughout the industry for all-you-can-eat internet services. Nor would they have co-funded Rome which, while not a successful show, shattered the ceiling on television production - paving the way for epics like GoT to exist.

And that's just two examples from a legal/production angle - the cultural influences are far too numerous to list. To assume commercial TV would have eventually filled those gaps, or that there are no barriers left for the BBC to breakdown, is naive at best.
 

Mindwipe

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It was a bit unclear. I meant that we do not need government funded entertainment shows anymore, since we have a lot of options already, including on-demand that is investing in quality shows lately and does experimenting. So with that added to the commercial broadcasters, I see little need for public tv to fulfill this role.

So in summary

  • You're moving the goalposts to "entertainment" because your argument on comedy has sank without trace.
  • On-demand commissioning of UK content is infinitesimal and would in fact not produce a sustainable UK production sector at all if it weren't for the commissions done by the BBC.
  • You were wrong.

If none have been made by not even the BBC, then I also don't get the complaint, since if even they aren't making it, there seems to be little demand for it at the moment.

I explicitly excluded BBC commissions, because BBC commissions are obviously not a very good argument for scrapping the BBC.
 

Phamit

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Jul 24, 2013
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i make 3k a year

i spend it all on cheese

 

Mindwipe

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I don't understand Chris Evans.. I don't dislike him particularly but I really don't see the £2m+ appeal

2016 figures = includes Top Gear = turns out presenting the world's most popular show and the one that commands the biggest part of the BBC's commercial revenue is quite important.

Another thing that's not reflected in these figures - generally speaking presenters rights are bought out so you don't have to pay them residuals for repeats and international sales (though international sales may involve other deals, but not always). Actors never (ever) have that happen, Equity would throw a fit, so total cost of ownership of a programme is not reflected by the numbers.
 

ClosingADoor

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So in summary

  • You're moving the goalposts to "entertainment" because your argument on comedy has sank without trace.
  • On-demand commissioning of UK content is infinitesimal and would in fact not produce a sustainable UK production sector at all if it weren't for the commissions done by the BBC.
  • You were wrong.



I explicitly excluded BBC commissions, because BBC commissions are obviously not a very good argument for scrapping the BBC.
No, I am not moving anything, since my original argument was "Government paid tv should only be for things like news," etc.

That stands. You then brought up UK comedy. Well, if that is not being made, then there are reasons for that. Don't get the hostility about this.
 

JonnyDBrit

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Couldn't disagree more. BBC should be able to operate across all forms of programming, so long as there is a balance.

If the BBC only focused on "things like news" they never would have had the need to put 8 years of legal efforts into VoD content licensing for iPlayer - which laid the contractual framework now used throughout the industry for all-you-can-eat services. Nor would they have co-funded Rome which, while not a successful show, shattered the ceiling on television production - paving the way for epics like GoT to exist.

And that's just two examples from a legal/production angle - the cultural influences are far too numerous to list. To assume commercial TV would have eventually filled those gaps, or that there are no barriers left for the BBC to breakdown, is naive at best.

In fairness, the other half of that co-production was HBO, so they basically took what they had been comfortable with for a historical setting and transplanted that to a fantasy one.
 

Alienfan

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Graham Norton seems underpayed relative to the rest of the list. I thought it would be in the millions