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Binary Domain trailer and screens (Sega - Yakuza Team - PS360)

Pooya

Member
Aug 12, 2009
19,861
0
970

Official Site
http://www.binarydomaingame.jp/

Trailer
http://www.famitsu.com/news/201012/01036402.html
http://www.binarydomaingame.jp/html/trailer.html
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1NNRsaXq4LQ
thanks Speedymanic for the youtube link.

SEGA is pleased to announce Binary Domain, an original squad-based shooter by Toshihiro Nagoshi, the creator behind some of SEGA’s most well-known video game franchises, including the critically acclaimed Yakuza series. Binary Domain puts players in the middle of a fast-paced and intense battle for humanity in robot-invaded 2080 Tokyo. Fighting through the derelict lower levels of the city, players control an international peace-keeping squad that soon starts to question their surroundings and the choices they are making. Are the robots becoming more human, or are humans becoming more like machines?

Message from Toshihiro Nagoshi

Nagoshi-san has provided a description in his own words, that speaks to the overall game design and philosophy behind Binary Domain. Please read on:

Usually games have a simple theme, but if we aim to maximize the appeal of a game as interactive entertainment, we need to develop more sophisticated themes that tie into every aspect of the game. I have made many attempts to link a game heavy in drama to a highly enjoyable and immersive gameplay experience and with Binary Domain every setting and mechanic in the game is designed to revolve around “Life”.

To further visualize this idea, I started to create “Binary Domain”. The core concept of this game from the beginning is life; the project code name from the start was in fact “Inochi”, which means “life” in Japanese. The most distinctive way of differentiating a creature from a machine is “life”. However, we also know that machines can be given a form of life when created by man. Is it possible that the differentiation is becoming less clear and machines are actually becoming more like humans?

One of the key elements of this is the pursuit of strong and differentiated human AND robot AI. Aiming to have the world’s best AI was essential to bring a true realisation of the concept of life to the players, through the story and the action within the gameplay. The inclusion of online modes has allowed us to transform the game from a mere battle field into a field of survival.

Additionally, the game is set in Tokyo in the year 2080. This was important to realise the theme of life as it’s where we (the development team) are actually living as we tell the story of this drama. I decided to combine this with a deep human drama with science fiction, despite most science fiction games being cold and clinical.

Finally, and best of all, I am working with the Yakuza team who are all excited to take on this new challenge and we are hoping that the technique and pride developed on the Yakuza series will move up to a new level.

That’s all I can tell you now, but I’m sure the game will amaze you in the near future more than you could imagine.

Don’t miss it!

Toshihiro Nagoshi
Screenshots:











for more info about the game visit this thread
http://www.neogaf.com/forum/showthread.php?t=414325
 

Femmeworth

Banned
Aug 4, 2006
29,841
0
0
Texas
Token Black Guy: "Wake up, fool!"

Oh no it gets worse. "Let the good times roll."

Edit: Okay, the end of the trailer is just... :lol
 

Blimblim

The Inside Track
Jun 8, 2004
17,966
15
1,750
Wow, that was really average. Reminds me somehow of Quantum Theory, and that's *not* a good thing.
 

Ninja Moomin

Banned
Dec 8, 2008
3,131
0
0
oh god.... sometimes these japanese interpretations of what they see as western gamers wanting is just embarrassing...

to the point of almost being a caricature of the real thing.... except they are serious.


if a western developer tried to release a game with a veneer of 'japan-game-ness' over there they'd say we'd completely missed the cultural reference points of the real thing. well, the same is true vice versa - ostensibly all the elements are there but the soul is missing.

why are japanese dev so hell bent on poorly replicating games that western developers know inside out and ignoring their own strengths? i can't see much of a future for them if they don't start playing to their strengths


or.... are they becoming irrelevant? when was the last third party japanese game a huge blockbuster in the west anyway?
 

geebee

Banned
Dec 5, 2008
2,733
0
0
San Jose, CA
steamcommunity.com
Not looking good. Isnt this whole "w=What makes a human a human?" theme being addressed in the latest Deus Ex? The concept is interesting and I'd like to see it more in games.. but when the presentation is this generic, why bother?
 

Grimmy

Banned
Sep 8, 2005
3,025
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0
I'm impressed at how many cliches they were able to squeeze in in such a short trailer!
 

Ninja Scooter

Member
Jun 7, 2004
123,715
6
0
The 2 main dudes getting into a fight was kinda funny. Outside of that it, the design would have looked outdated and generic 10 years ago. It looks like something you'd see in an advertisement for some Art Institute in the back of an old issue of Next Generation magazine, or on the box for some 3D card from 1996.
 

Takao

Banned
Mar 19, 2009
50,997
0
0
Toronto, Canada


Dude who slaps people around is totally Sam Worthington or any other generic lead of this generation. SEGA totally hoped to get the Terminator license, failed, and decided to go with this.
 
Here's some great quotes about the game's goals.

AndriaSang said:
The reason Nagoshi decided to stick with Japan is because of the game's goal of delivering a rich, human drama. He believes that as a person born and raised in Japan, it's easier to make drama if the game is set in Japan. Also, he feels that having a Japanese staff would be meaningless if, due to the game targeting the world market, you end up making all the world settings and cinematic ares of the game oriented to overseas players.
AndriaSang said:
The central element to the story is a battle between humans and robots. Nagoshi would not give a reason for the fight, but did say that at this point in history the world's basic industry is driven by robots. Robots have permeated human life deeply.

Asked what kind of story we can expect for the game, Nagoshi said the fundamental theme will be a reexamination of "life." The game will ask the question, what exactly is life? Nagoshi feels that "life," while a concept that's known by everyone, is still difficult to understand.
AndriaSang said:
Closing off the interview, Nagoshi emphasized that the game's top priority is to deliver a heated drama that shows rich ties between characters. The various game systems that are being put to use in the game are simply a method for showing that rich drama.

The terminology used by Nagoshi in his comments on drama isn't too far removed from when he speaks at a high level about the Yakuza series. Although Yakuza and Binary Domain have different settings and approaches, the basic desire to deliver a heated message to users is shared between the two games, explained Nagoshi.
Source: http://www.andriasang.com/e/blog/2010/12/01/binary_domain/
 

Giolon

Member
Dec 5, 2008
8,002
20
975
Bay Area, CA
www.radiantcg.com
NinjaFusion said:
oh god.... sometimes these japanese interpretations of what they see as western gamers wanting is just embarrassing...

to the point of almost being a caricature of the real thing.... except they are serious.


if a western developer tried to release a game with a veneer of 'japan-game-ness' over there they'd say we'd completely missed the cultural reference points of the real thing. well, the same is true vice versa - ostensibly all the elements are there but the soul is missing.

why are japanese dev so hell bent on poorly replicating games that western developers know inside out and ignoring their own strengths? i can't see much of a future for them if they don't start playing to their strengths
Give this junior a promotion!
 

hamchan

Member
Jan 4, 2009
31,497
0
0
Sydney, Australia
Yeah doesn't look that good. Replace them all with Yakuza characters and it'll be better.

Black guy reminds me of the heavy from TF2.

They really think this appeals to the West?
 

Pooya

Member
Aug 12, 2009
19,861
0
970
Press release

http://blogs.sega.com/usa/2010/12/01/sega-announces-binary-domain/
SEGA is pleased to announce Binary Domain, an original squad-based shooter by Toshihiro Nagoshi, the creator behind some of SEGA’s most well-known video game franchises, including the critically acclaimed Yakuza series. Binary Domain puts players in the middle of a fast-paced and intense battle for humanity in robot-invaded 2080 Tokyo. Fighting through the derelict lower levels of the city, players control an international peace-keeping squad that soon starts to question their surroundings and the choices they are making. Are the robots becoming more human, or are humans becoming more like machines?

Message from Toshihiro Nagoshi

Nagoshi-san has provided a description in his own words, that speaks to the overall game design and philosophy behind Binary Domain. Please read on:

Usually games have a simple theme, but if we aim to maximize the appeal of a game as interactive entertainment, we need to develop more sophisticated themes that tie into every aspect of the game. I have made many attempts to link a game heavy in drama to a highly enjoyable and immersive gameplay experience and with Binary Domain every setting and mechanic in the game is designed to revolve around “Life”.

To further visualize this idea, I started to create “Binary Domain”. The core concept of this game from the beginning is life; the project code name from the start was in fact “Inochi”, which means “life” in Japanese. The most distinctive way of differentiating a creature from a machine is “life”. However, we also know that machines can be given a form of life when created by man. Is it possible that the differentiation is becoming less clear and machines are actually becoming more like humans?

One of the key elements of this is the pursuit of strong and differentiated human AND robot AI. Aiming to have the world’s best AI was essential to bring a true realisation of the concept of life to the players, through the story and the action within the gameplay. The inclusion of online modes has allowed us to transform the game from a mere battle field into a field of survival.

Additionally, the game is set in Tokyo in the year 2080. This was important to realise the theme of life as it’s where we (the development team) are actually living as we tell the story of this drama. I decided to combine this with a deep human drama with science fiction, despite most science fiction games being cold and clinical.

Finally, and best of all, I am working with the Yakuza team who are all excited to take on this new challenge and we are hoping that the technique and pride developed on the Yakuza series will move up to a new level.

That’s all I can tell you now, but I’m sure the game will amaze you in the near future more than you could imagine.

Don’t miss it!

Toshihiro Nagoshi
 
Aug 27, 2009
10,999
0
0
Ninja Scooter said:
Outside of that it, the design would have looked outdated and generic 10 years ago. It looks like something you'd see in an advertisement for some Art Institute in the back of an old issue of Next Generation magazine, or on the box for some 3D card from 1996.
No surprises there, Yakuza games are also quite old-fashioned and almost archaic in their basic design.
 

Azure Dream

Member
Oct 30, 2004
18,051
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39
It took until the last 15 seconds to get vaguely interesting. That and the in-fighting I guess. The graphics seemed technically good (if they're actually real-time), but the animation was really awful in spots and didn't seem to sync up with what was happening, the tone couldn't decide if it was completely generic or derivative (no shame in stealing a Terminator moment I guess... and using it twice in the same 4 minute trailer...), the enemy robots looked like they're supposed to intentionally be a play on the green "army men" toys, which made them hard to take serious, and they didn't show the characters using or doing one thing that looked unique or interesting. Unless we can do mid-air cinematic ammo exchanges?

On a side note, I really didn't understand why the other two seemed suitably armed, and the girl was running around with a single tiny handgun with barely any ammo. Plot could explain it, but it looked silly and useless here.


Edit: So this is supposed to be focused on the A.I. and human drama. Well, that trailer did a terrible job at showing off both, then.
 

ZealousD

Makes world leading predictions like "The sun will rise tomorrow"
Apr 17, 2007
29,342
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This looks lik...zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
 

hiro4

Member
Dec 8, 2008
1,961
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0
I was kinda expecting the baby having red eyes like the machines.
So I was kinda surprised at the legs.

Still it looks too much pre-alpha to me.
 

Castor Krieg

Banned
Dec 5, 2007
7,983
0
0
Warsaw
REMEMBER CITADEL said:
What happened, Japan, what happened?
Someone brainwashed Japanese devs into thinking "international" game = generic as shit, sneezefest. Makes you wonder if they even look at the games made in the West.

Really, this game will get 6/10 or 7/10 as every GAME FOR INTERNATIONAL AUDIENCE before that.