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|OT| British Election mega-thread - 12th December 2019 : Let's try again, again.

Steve.1981

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Oct 6, 2015
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Is this the most suitable thread for a guy to moan and groan about what the hell has happened to the Labour party?

Because I really do wonder what the hell has happened to the Labour party.

I'm from a small, relatively poor, working class town in Scotland. I was raised to be a Labour supporter by my red hot Labour dad, who was raised to be a Labour supporter by my red hot Labour Grandpa. These days I struggle to find anybody in my real world, day to day existence who doesn't have a sad story to tell about how they've finally given up on what was supposed to be the party of the working man.

At the election last year, neither my dad nor me voted. It seemed like there was nobody speaking for us. We both agreed that comrade Corbyn was out of the question. I was shocked to hear the old man actually wondering if he should vote Tory, shocked that was how bad things had got. He decided against it in the end because he said my Papa would turn in his grave, but good God he seriously considered it!

What's happened to Labour. Are Keir Starmer and Rebecca Long Bailey really the best they can offer us? Jesus wept.
 

Greedings

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May 23, 2016
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The way labour voters find it repulsive to vote for tories is a crazy level of brain washing.
 

hariseldon

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Aug 22, 2018
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Steve.1981 Steve.1981 Absolutely spot on place for it - I've done enough of it. Similar to you I was brought up in a working class family that had ALWAYS voted Labour. In some ways that's kinda the problem (as Greedings Greedings alludes to - I'll come to your point shortly). The thing is I was always brought up with the idea that us working class need to stick together. I could never wrap my head around working class people voting Tory (slugs voting for salt to use the popular analogy). Thatcher and her vicious cabinet hated us, fought the unions to take away our rights, took away free school milk, and was generally held to be evil. The rule was that the rich voted Tory and the poor voted Labour, and it was ever thus. Then Blair happened. He pulled in the middle class vote and for the left that was a wonderful thing. He was able to put enormous investment into the NHS by focusing on actually winning elections, which he did by broadening the party to take in more people. He didn't know it however but he was setting up the disaster we see today.

The middle-class colonised the Labour party, but this also allowed the Labour Party to colonise the middle class. Talk of working class struggle left them out, they needed their own struggle, their own oppression, and that birthed identity politics in its modern form. Now Jemima and Tarquin are far more likely to be lefties than Tories, but that means the working class have been booted out of their home. The Tories, sensing an opportunity, have taken them in, don't call them deplorable, share their inherent social conservatism and have formed a new coalition. I think Tories working with the working class might just be the start of something new. Meanwhile, all the best talent has left Labour, either purged by Momentum or leaving sensing the party was no longer for them. That, in short, is the death of the working class left in the UK.

Greedings Greedings - I alluded to it earlier but Labour was always the party of the poor - the worker's party, hence the name Labour. The Tories traditionally hated us, from Thatcher the milk-snatcher through Cameron's austerity. There's a real aversion to voting Tory because of that, but the fact that people managed to despite that really shows how far Labour have fallen. I had more to say on the topic but got distracted by something else and now can't remember what I was going to say!
 

Greedings

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May 23, 2016
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I get the history behind it, but to effectively brainwash a section of the population in to voting for one party, and being disgusted at the thought of voting for another, is an amazing electoral strategy. Even worse that Labour hasn't been a party for the working classes since the early 1990's. That's a generation ago. People need to move on.

Not saying they should vote tory, but man, if Labour aren't looking out for your best interests, maybe a string of high profile electoral defeats will make them change their strategy (again lol).
 

DV27

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Jun 14, 2010
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Corbyn and the Momentum acolytes have done damage to the Labour party that will last a long time.

It should be no surprise that when people are being introspective and looking for the kind of talent that they need, it cannot be found.
 
Dec 25, 2018
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Steve.1981 Steve.1981 Absolutely spot on place for it - I've done enough of it. Similar to you I was brought up in a working class family that had ALWAYS voted Labour. In some ways that's kinda the problem (as Greedings Greedings alludes to - I'll come to your point shortly). The thing is I was always brought up with the idea that us working class need to stick together. I could never wrap my head around working class people voting Tory (slugs voting for salt to use the popular analogy). Thatcher and her vicious cabinet hated us, fought the unions to take away our rights, took away free school milk, and was generally held to be evil. The rule was that the rich voted Tory and the poor voted Labour, and it was ever thus. Then Blair happened. He pulled in the middle class vote and for the left that was a wonderful thing. He was able to put enormous investment into the NHS by focusing on actually winning elections, which he did by broadening the party to take in more people. He didn't know it however but he was setting up the disaster we see today.

The middle-class colonised the Labour party, but this also allowed the Labour Party to colonise the middle class. Talk of working class struggle left them out, they needed their own struggle, their own oppression, and that birthed identity politics in its modern form. Now Jemima and Tarquin are far more likely to be lefties than Tories, but that means the working class have been booted out of their home. The Tories, sensing an opportunity, have taken them in, don't call them deplorable, share their inherent social conservatism and have formed a new coalition. I think Tories working with the working class might just be the start of something new. Meanwhile, all the best talent has left Labour, either purged by Momentum or leaving sensing the party was no longer for them. That, in short, is the death of the working class left in the UK.

Greedings Greedings - I alluded to it earlier but Labour was always the party of the poor - the worker's party, hence the name Labour. The Tories traditionally hated us, from Thatcher the milk-snatcher through Cameron's austerity. There's a real aversion to voting Tory because of that, but the fact that people managed to despite that really shows how far Labour have fallen. I had more to say on the topic but got distracted by something else and now can't remember what I was going to say!
Tony Blair is also the one to criticise the current Labour party by not seeing what he did with them in the first place.

My family votes Labour, but I vote Green as I align more to their views, but it is sad to see how Labour have become this weird non-identical thingamijig that no one can understand that they would rather vote in Boris (I could never do that myself).

Labour, at least my impression of it, were supposed to give us back the Workers Rights amongst sharing the Tax across all of the sectors, but talking to a Tutor of mine, I actually saw a little bit of why the Tories invest so much in London (because the wealth is spread across the Nation systematically through businesses) but I do tend to disagree the way it does work, although being told that the Stock Market braces for a crash when Labour shoot most of the Taxes elsewhere, I did get a lot of sense on why people vote for each side depending on how well you do for yourself.

If the Tories can work with the working class, then that would be a miracle, but I sadly don't trust any of the Cabinet or Boris for it to happen and the ones that will suffer are the ones who got into power in the North (who are likely going to be more genuine and represent the North better) and the Voters who put their trust in the Tories.

Labours problem seems to be catering to a niche voter base that falsely represents the masses. Lib Dems have done the exact same and now you see them scrambling to what they identify as, as well!
 

Kazza

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Oct 6, 2018
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Labour is really fucked if even a black anti-racist campaigner with decades of experience can no longer pass their purity test:


A pioneering anti-racism campaigner, Mr Phillips, 66, now faces expulsion from the party for alleged prejudice against Muslims. He first alerted Britain to the problem of Islamophobia in the 1990s but is now being investigated for public statements that include expressing concerns about Pakistani Muslim men sexually abusing children in northern towns such as Rotherham.

Comments by Mr Phillips about the failure by some Muslims to wear poppies for Remembrance Sunday and the sympathy shown by a substantial proportion in an opinion poll towards the “motives” of the Charlie-Hebdo killers also form part of the complaint.

Who the fuck isn't concerned about Pakistani Muslim men sexually abusing children in northern towns such as Rotherham? Silly question, the Labour party and the police, of course...

I think the so-called TERFs will be the next to be expelled. Starmer doesn't strike me as one of the crazy ones. I wonder if he can hold it all together. As a hetro, white, male I really don't fancy his chances.
 

sahlberg

Gold Member
Oct 27, 2017
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Labour is really fucked if even a black anti-racist campaigner with decades of experience can no longer pass their purity test:





Who the fuck isn't concerned about Pakistani Muslim men sexually abusing children in northern towns such as Rotherham? Silly question, the Labour party and the police, of course...

I think the so-called TERFs will be the next to be expelled. Starmer doesn't strike me as one of the crazy ones. I wonder if he can hold it all together. As a hetro, white, male I really don't fancy his chances.
Trevor Phillips. We hereby welcome you as our newest member in the most diverse movement ever: white people.
I hope you will like it here with your peers of all skin colors and every ethnicity.

You are now a white man. Probably heterosexual too.
 
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hariseldon

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Aug 22, 2018
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Here's what Trevor had to say on the matter:

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/trevor-phillips-how-i-fell-victim-to-labours-inquisition-9gg9qjk8f

Posting in full because paywall.

Trevor Phillips: How I fell victim to Labour’s inquisition
The party’s investigation of me for alleged Islamophobia shows it’s becoming an authoritarian cult


Tyranny is often represented as the pounding of a fist on the door in the middle of the night. In fact, in my short time as chairman of the free speech charity Index on Censorship, I have learnt that many people living under authoritarian regimes first encounter it in the dry language of a bureaucrat’s warning: recant, repent, denounce your fellow deviants and you may save your livelihood. Your soul may, just, escape damnation.

When I glanced at the 11-page letter sent to me recently by the Labour Party, the phrase “administrative suspension” grabbed my attention. These words signal banishment from a community that I have inhabited for decades: friends, colleagues, even family may be compelled to shun me. Significantly, my indictment concerns matters of faith, doctrine and dissent. It is written, not in the language of a democratic, open political movement but in the cold-eyed, accusatory prose of the zealot. In essence, after more than 30 years of promoting the Labour cause, I am accused of heresy, and threatened with excommunication.

Last year a cross-party parliamentary group proposed that “Islamophobia” should be defined in broad terms as a “kind of racism” hostile to “Muslimness”. In a pamphlet for the Policy Exchange think tank, I responded that Islam is not owned by any ethnic group and that Muslims are not a race. Worse, the undefined concept “Muslimness” implies that all adherents agree on doctrine, dress and behaviours: it’s the far-left equivalent of the racist cliché “they all look the same to me”. It was therefore only a matter of time before this “definition” would lead to the persecution of dissidents. But I never imagined that I would be one of its first victims.

Labour’s threat to expel me has been drawn up in secret and my fate will be decided in absentia. I am forbidden from repeating the charges but I can reflect on what is not alleged. There is no suggestion I have done anything unlawful or offended any individual. All my “sins” can be seen by anyone who can use Google.

It doesn’t take much effort to accuse anyone who has tried, like me, to expose the poison in identity politics. Each year, an Iranian-backed, LGBT-hating extremist group publishes a list of alleged “Islamophobes”. It has featured Barack Obama, the journalist Yasmin Alibhai-Brown, the slain staff of Charlie Hebdo — and me. Peter Tatchell, the human rights campaigner, joked that he was offended at being left out.

My 2016 essay “Race and Faith: The Deafening Silence” observed that many men involved in the grooming and sexual abuse of children in towns such as Rotherham, as exposed by The Times, came from Pakistani-Muslim backgrounds. This was branded prejudice by some — but surely honest journalism, unburdened by fear of causing offence, should be beyond contention? And even though I described Enoch Powell’s “Rivers of Blood” speech in the same essay as “a ghastly testament to the power of unbridled free speech”, I was accused of racism by some for merely mentioning his name.

Readers will appreciate my perplexity. I am a person of colour, with a family heritage of Fulani and Mandinka Muslims going back 1,000 years until ripped apart by transatlantic slavery. Some of my relatives have made the return journey to embrace Islam. It also seems peculiar to make an example of someone who introduced the term “Islamophobia” to British politics by commissioning the Runnymede Trust’s 1997 report on the issue; and who then, as head of the Commission for Racial Equality, worked closely with Labour on the Racial and Religious Hatred Act 2006 that protects Muslims from incitement.

No one inside or outside the Labour Party has ever suggested that I have broken any rules. I have never been “no-platformed”. In the final week of the 2019 election campaign, I even celebrated the 40th anniversary of the Sickle Cell Society alongside one of Jeremy Corbyn’s closest allies, Dawn Butler. She has known me for decades — would she really have agreed to appear on stage with a bigot?

So what accounts for this extraordinary turn of events? Some will see it as payback by Corbynistas for public criticisms I made of the leadership’s failure to tackle antisemitism in the party. Another possibility is that it’s an attempt to scare the Equality and Human Rights Commission, which I used to lead and which is investigating Labour’s handling of antisemitism. Weaponising Islamophobia to attack political opponents may seem like clever tactics but trying to intimidate a legally independent organisation is pure political gangsterism. Perhaps someone in Labour HQ has been reading up on the Inquisition’s methods; in 1578, one official defined its purpose thus: “That others may become terrified and weaned away from the evils they would commit.”

I accept that I may not share all the views of Labour’s current leader or even of the majority of members. But I have never belonged to any other party and I have stuck by it through thick and thin. If this is how Labour treats its own family, how might it treat its real opponents if it ever gains power again? It would be a tragedy if, at the very moment we most need a robust and effective opposition, our nation had to endure the spectacle of a great party collapsing into a brutish, authoritarian cult.
 
Oct 15, 2019
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Tony Blair is also the one to criticise the current Labour party by not seeing what he did with them in the first place.

My family votes Labour, but I vote Green as I align more to their views, but it is sad to see how Labour have become this weird non-identical thingamijig that no one can understand that they would rather vote in Boris (I could never do that myself).

Labour, at least my impression of it, were supposed to give us back the Workers Rights amongst sharing the Tax across all of the sectors, but talking to a Tutor of mine, I actually saw a little bit of why the Tories invest so much in London (because the wealth is spread across the Nation systematically through businesses) but I do tend to disagree the way it does work, although being told that the Stock Market braces for a crash when Labour shoot most of the Taxes elsewhere, I did get a lot of sense on why people vote for each side depending on how well you do for yourself.

If the Tories can work with the working class, then that would be a miracle, but I sadly don't trust any of the Cabinet or Boris for it to happen and the ones that will suffer are the ones who got into power in the North (who are likely going to be more genuine and represent the North better) and the Voters who put their trust in the Tories.

Labours problem seems to be catering to a niche voter base that falsely represents the masses. Lib Dems have done the exact same and now you see them scrambling to what they identify as, as well!
Cant say I know the intricacies of the political situation over there, being American and all, but I think I understand how the Tories are going to court the working class vote. They're likely going to try and leverage the Brexit situation to create favorable conditions for industry.

From how I understand it, the North is heavily industrialized and tends to vote Labour. At the highest level, all industry cares about is turning a profit. It is the one interest they will never fail to act towards. If it looks like that pursuit is going to fail, industry will pressure the worker despite knowing doing so will likely put people in power against their interests. While that instability is obviously a major concern, profit and the survival of the business comes first.

That is where the crux of most reasonable conflict between industry and the worker emerges. If the Tories can create favorable trade conditions in the wake of Brexit, industry will happily take the growth without needing to anger the worker. Some companies will get greedy and try to double dip, but I'd like to think most would have the sense to save that ill will for when times are worse.

Basically I believe that the opportunity to restructure international trade will lead to conditions bettering for the average worker in the short term. That should mean the chances for Tories to retain their seats should be high, so long as the prosperity lasts. The moment that will make or break it for the Tories in the long term is if they support the worker when prosperity begins to fade. I dont know if fear of identity politics gaining a foothold will be enough of a stick to make that change.
 

Steve.1981

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Oct 6, 2015
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I know my feelings about voting Labour did basically come from a kind of brain-washing. But I do think that original sentiment, way back when, did come from a necessary place. Labour was the party of the working man and we needed it.

Everything's changing now though. I voted SNP a couple of times and I'm not allergic to voting Tory. I would consider it these days. But I do still wish we could have Labour back on our side like it used to be.

But here we go... Someone else is mentioning the grooming gangs. Trevor Phillips no less! Fuck it. Silence him too! Silence everybody!
 
Dec 25, 2018
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The guy mentions that Labour is becoming an Authoritarian Party but both them and the Tories have always been Authoritarian?

It is sad to see hin being silenced when he mentions the bad eggs in the Muslim Community of Rotherham and shows just how regressive and bigoted Labour as a party is.
 
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Greedings

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May 23, 2016
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The Labour party is lost.

There needs to be something to fill the gap. Currently we have the blue middle class, slightly left of centre party. The Red middle class left of centre party, and the yellow middle class left of centre party.

If you're not represented by one of those, you're probably not alone. I've always voted Tory, but if a more serious conservative party emerged, I'd vote for them.
I'm also sure that if a serious party representing working class people started to come up, we'd see them get a ton of votes.
Maybe my history is a bit off, but wasn't Labour started by working class people, especially trade unionists, who decided to go in to politics? Now it's just middle class people NOT educated at Eton and Oxford.
 

Gashtronomy

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Apr 19, 2019
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The Labour party is lost.

There needs to be something to fill the gap. Currently we have the blue middle class, slightly left of centre party. The Red middle class left of centre party, and the yellow middle class left of centre party.

If you're not represented by one of those, you're probably not alone. I've always voted Tory, but if a more serious conservative party emerged, I'd vote for them.
I'm also sure that if a serious party representing working class people started to come up, we'd see them get a ton of votes.
Maybe my history is a bit off, but wasn't Labour started by working class people, especially trade unionists, who decided to go in to politics? Now it's just middle class people NOT educated at Eton and Oxford.

Labour have moved from representing the working classes, for fair pay for fair work, to an authoritarian leftist regime that would make Stalin proud. They don't care about the poor, they just HATE the rich.
 

Greedings

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Labour have moved from representing the working classes, for fair pay for fair work, to an authoritarian leftist regime that would make Stalin proud. They don't care about the poor, they just HATE the rich.
The funny thing is, most of them are rich! Just not mega rich billionaires. Certainly rich by any normal measure.
 
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Dr.D00p

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They're now nothing but a party run by a bunch of 6th form, student union types still trying to fight the class warfare of their youth who treat their traditional working class voters with contempt and view them as nothing more than a play thing for their social engineering experiments.
 

Stilton Disco

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They hate anyone richer than them. If they strip the mega rich of assets, they become the new elite and have all of the power.
It's that last word that I think is the real crux of the matter, and how identity politics has been able to sink its rot so deep into the party.

It's not about money or class anymore, because they're in the middle with both, instead it's power they want and power they see the whole world through the lens of. It's how once noble goals of equality and fairness have been twisted into hatered of the status quo and paranoia that everyone is out to get anyone that can threaten their 'groups' power bracket.

I think thats the real reason they show such open contempt for the working class.

Not only aren't the masses voting the way they want, but they're also part of the 'privelidged' strata of british society, even if in reality they're more often than not the least privileged people in the country, and thus they can be as rude about them as they like, because by their worldview they're only ever 'punching upwards'.
 
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Dec 25, 2018
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Labour being the worst of a bad lot is pretty striking given we used to see the Tories like this, but even they are not this dumb to start kicking out someone if they don't quite fit the peg.

Lib Dems are closer to Labour's ideals than Labour is now.

Although I would still think that the Greens are more traditional Labour with a more Environmentalist view on things (not everything I agree with of course but I feel like they represent me the best).

At this rate, UKIP should just fold and become the new Conservatives with real Right Winged Values.
 
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hariseldon

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Aug 22, 2018
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Labour being the worst of a bad lot is pretty striking given we used to see the Tories like this, but even they are not this dumb to start kicking out someone if they don't quite fit the peg.

Lib Dems are closer to Labour's ideals than Labour is now.

Although I would still think that the Greens are more traditional Labour with a more Environmentalist view on things (not everything I agree with of course but I feel like they represent me the best).

At this rate, UKIP should just fold and become the new Conservatives with real Right Winged Values.
UKIP are dead - Farage took the best talent to the Brexit party and now with mission accomplished that party lacks a purpose tbh.
 

hariseldon

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Budget response to coronavirus:
- Govt expects 20% of workers to be off at a time
- statutory sick pay paid from day 1 instead of 4, will also be available for all advised to self-isolate even if by 111. Self-employed no longer wait a week for benefits. Temporarily removing min income floor on univeral credit. 0.5bn of boost to welfare system.
- 500m hardship fund - local authorities can use to support vulnerable people in area.
- for businesses with <250 employees ssp cost will for up to 14 days be refunded by govt in full
- also allowing businesses to defer tax payments
- temporary corona business interruption loan scheme - 1.2bn earmarked for it
- shops, cinemas etc below a certain size business rate abolished for this year - this has been extended to other retail/leisure/hospitality business where valus is <150k
- fundamental review of business rates in Autumn
- for any small-business-rates relief-eligible company can have a £3k grant
- with other measures a £30bn fiscal stimulus to get the economy through this

In other news Rishi can't say conservative. He says conzervative instead.

Freezing duties on booze

Fuel duty freeze remains

R&D investment increased to 22bn/year - highest as % of gdp in 40 years, higher than China, US and Japan.
- investment into nuclear fusion, space, electric vehicles
- building new research org modelled on ARPA

- freezing levy on electricity, increasing it on gas
- plastic packaging tax from Apr 22
- red diesel (hugely discounted diesel) - was 2.4bn tax break for pollution. Abolishing for most sectors. Will not take effect for 2 years. Won't apply to agriculture.
- doubling R&D fund for energy innovation
- cutting taxes on clean transport
- £500m to support roll-out of rapid-charge hubs
- 120m immediately available to repair defences damaged in winter floods, 200m to build better flood resilience where flooding is repeated, doubling flood defence budget.

- Planting a shitload of trees and investing in carbon capture storage clusters. Create jobs up North doing so.

Highest public investment since 1950s

Treasury will have offices in each country, new economic campus in the North, 22000 civil servants moved outside of London (that'll save some money on wages), extra 640m for Scottish govt, more for Wales and Ireland, £220m for cities.

New Metro mayors will get London-style funding settlements worth 4bn in addition to 1bn fund to invest in cities.

5bn fund to get gigabit broadband into hard to reach places.

Road and motorway enhancement to the tune of £27bn - 4000 miles of road. Plus 2.5bn pothole fund and investment in local roads.

Education - 3 year settlement for 7bn was already in place, adding a shitload of extra funding (can't type fast enough)
- 1.5bn into further education

Removing VAT from digital publications from 1st December for books, magazines, newspapers and academic journals.

12bn investment in affordable housing
Cutting interest rates on loans for local authorities to build housing
1.1bn to build 70000 homes in areas of high demand
400m fund for mayors to build on brownfield sites
Planning system to be updated
650m to get rough sleepers into accomodation
2% stamp duty surcharge for non-uk residents - should take out some of the ridiculous foreign ownership
new building safety fund 1bn to deal with unsafe building materials

increasing immigration health surcharge to £624
measures to deal with tax evasion/avoidance

measures to reduce tax burden on NHS staff

NHS spending already increased 34bn - adding another 6bn in this parliament.
 
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Dec 15, 2011
6,465
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Budget response to coronavirus:
- Govt expects 20% of workers to be off at a time
- statutory sick pay paid from day 1 instead of 4, will also be available for all advised to self-isolate even if by 111. Self-employed no longer wait a week for benefits. Temporarily removing min income floor on univeral credit. 0.5bn of boost to welfare system.
- 500m hardship fund - local authorities can use to support vulnerable people in area.
- for businesses with <250 employees ssp cost will for up to 14 days be refunded by govt in full
- also allowing businesses to defer tax payments
- temporary corona business interruption loan scheme - 1.2bn earmarked for it
- shops, cinemas etc below a certain size business rate abolished for this year - this has been extended to other retail/leisure/hospitality business where valus is <150k
- fundamental review of business rates in Autumn
- for any small-business-rates relief-eligible company can have a £3k grant
- with other measures a £30bn fiscal stimulus to get the economy through this
Is this taken from a source, or your own summary?

(Not trying to discredit you, I generally believe every word you say :messenger_smiling_hearts: .)
 

Geoff

Formerly 'Bullroarer'
Jun 21, 2011
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That's a solid budget in terms of the give-aways. I can't really complain because they are doing what everyone said the gov't should do. Borrowing like fuck while rates are low and investing in the economy. Is the level of debt manageable? Time will tell
 

Greedings

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May 23, 2016
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I have a weird feeling this is a post-Brexit stimulus package, being pushed under the guise of a pandemic aid fund.

£30b is a shit load of money, especially compared to what other countries are doing.
 

hariseldon

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Aug 22, 2018
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I have a weird feeling this is a post-Brexit stimulus package, being pushed under the guise of a pandemic aid fund.

£30b is a shit load of money, especially compared to what other countries are doing.
There was always a big stimulus planned. The big thing though is it's a go at reshaping the economy. Just look at what they're investing in. It's a big deal tbh.
 

Gashtronomy

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Apr 19, 2019
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The investing in tech and R&D in renewables is what will help put Britain back on the map.

We have, for centuries, led the way in technological advancement and i'm glad to see the Tories going balls to the wall to get us back on track.

Moving civil servants out of London and creating offices up Norff and in each Country is a very cool move. It brings the Union back together through closer ties and moves dosh out of London, while saving a few quid!

Cheers for the billions for the roads as well, they're in a shit state at the moment.

Solid budget overall. Maybe one of the best in decades?
 

Kazza

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Oct 6, 2018
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I have a weird feeling this is a post-Brexit stimulus package, being pushed under the guise of a pandemic aid fund.

£30b is a shit load of money, especially compared to what other countries are doing.
Italy has already allocated similar sums, although their situation is more serious at present:



Hmm, a lot of extra spending in this budget. If they would be willing to put party politics aside for a moment, LAbour should be quite happy with this:

 

Steve.1981

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Oct 6, 2015
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The billions for roads is the big one for me.

In the name of sweet baby jesus, somebody, please tear up all the speed humps and fill in the bloody potholes.
 
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hariseldon

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Aug 22, 2018
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Crosspost from coronavirus thread:


So the British government wants herd immunity and suddenly we're eugenicists (because one special advisor hire turned out to be a nut and was promptly gotten rid of).. what is wrong with people? It's on the same level as the mob that attacked a paediatrician thinking the word meant paedophile.
 

Geoff

Formerly 'Bullroarer'
Jun 21, 2011
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The investing in tech and R&D in renewables is what will help put Britain back on the map.

We have, for centuries, led the way in technological advancement and i'm glad to see the Tories going balls to the wall to get us back on track.

Moving civil servants out of London and creating offices up Norff and in each Country is a very cool move. It brings the Union back together through closer ties and moves dosh out of London, while saving a few quid!

Cheers for the billions for the roads as well, they're in a shit state at the moment.

Solid budget overall. Maybe one of the best in decades?
Time will tell. It's a big gamble on rates and on GDP being boosted by the spending.

But I can't complain. It's the sort of budget I (and many people who aren't on the right) have been advocating for since austerity began. I don't think caution was going to work in post-brexit Britain. I was fundamentally opposed to leaving but now it's happening, we've got to be bold or we're fucked.

Plus tunnel under stonehenge on the A303 should really decrease driving time to London for me (at the cost of a great view).
 

DunDunDunpachi

Patient MembeR
Apr 18, 2018
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Good budget for Rishi and his first too.

Good call for massive investment in the roads, it's bloody well needed driving on Britians roads today is like that kids face at school, ya know the one that has tons of spots. I'm always dodging left and right thinking of my poor suspension and tyres.
A fellow pothole-dodger from Michigan, USA salutes you.
 
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GamingKaiju

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Oct 24, 2014
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So Brit Gaf do you think Corbyn would have handled the Chinese Flu outbreak any better than BoJo?

Personally, No I think BoJo is doing everything he can and Corbyn would have flapped it big time
 
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funkygunther

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Dec 22, 2018
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Of course he would have flubbed it, none of that cabinet looked like they could deal with any crisis whatsoever. Their brand of socialism relied on comfort.

However, we’re seeing now how nationalised industries could have saved the government having to bail out businesses, expect supermarkets to coordinate and consolidate their supply chains and saved having the health secretary ask nicely for ICUs if, you know, you guys have any spare or something.

So Corbyn, elected a couple of months ago, would have just as well/badly as Boris but had he been given some time to go full Red we’d probably be more miserable generally, but this crisis would have been handled better.