Can we really end racism if we don't address the root causes of racism?

mckmas8808

Member
May 24, 2005
40,251
3,196
1,320
No I'm just saying racism isn't something that just comes out of thin air. Like people said the 90's were a relatively racially harmonious period, and most of the people alive then are still around now. Did a lot of them just suddenly decide to become racists? No of course not. So why does it seem like there's a lot more racial animosity now?

The bolded is SUPER false. The economy during that time was exploding to amazing levels of good, so we as a country talked about it a lot less. Just remember that the Rodney King beating and the O.J. trial both happened in the early to mid-90s and race was all over tv about those two things.
 
Last edited:
Jun 15, 2018
36
21
100
I know this will be a controversial take on the subject, but I wonder why throughout history, people have always tried to "stop" racism in very simplistic ways. They would just say "don't be racist", or "racism is bad". But racism is a very complex issue with many causes and roots in many things. It's like telling people who hate pitbulls to just "stop hating pitbulls". Why not try to address why these people hate pitbulls in the first place?

We are living in a world where 99% of people are educated enough to know that humans all share the same physiology and DNA. So why does racism still exist? It certainly isn't just out of ignorance, right? So I don't see how helpful it is to just call racists "dumb" or "ignorant".

Of course there will still be a very small percentage of idiots and losers that hate other races no matter what, but my topic isn't about those people. I'm addressing the much more typical "racist" sentiments and attitudes. IMHO the causes for "hating" a certain race seems to boil down to these factors:

1. The perception that they are somehow detrimental to society (causing violence, crime, taking jobs, etc).
2. The perception that they are unable to integrate into a culture
3. The perception that they are given special treatment

So why don't people want to address what could be causing such perceptions? I think it would be much more helpful than just simply telling people to be "more tolerant" or "less hateful". Because I believe that humans are not inherently racist, but it's societal factors that creates race related hatred. There are many countries in the world where racism simply isn't an issue (like Japan for example).
One man's perception is another man's fact.
 

Catphish

Gold Member
Jan 13, 2017
1,563
1,698
400
Chicago, IL, USA
As long as the populace has their heads buried in media, it will never change.

For-profit media has one goal and one goal only: to sell copy. Whether that comes from physical sales, ratings, or clicks, they just want the eyeballs and that sweet ad revenue. And they will get what they want, because they excel at making you think something is important when it really isn't. That something is threatening when it really isn't. That something is horribly broken when it really isn't. It is my contention that media is pushing this racial bullshit, because it sells like a motherfucker, and it keeps us divided.

Conflict creates opportunity for profit.

If we used our daily interactions with people to extrapolate our world view, as opposed to the endless cavalcade of shit-stirring nonsense we can't seem to get enough of from TV and the internet, I think we would find that things aren't as bad as the Mouths are making it seem.

Of course there are problems and injustices in the world. But absorbing as many of them as we can just so we can argue about them ad nauseum doesn't help a fucking thing.

We need to focus our attention on our own lives, and our own spheres of influence, where it belongs, not on every single crisis piece coming out of WaPo or Fox so we can regurgitate it on the internet and yell, "See? You're wrong and I'm right! Told you so!"

Then, we will only see what's in front of us. The person, the humanity. Not the myriad fucking manufactured boogeymen that serve only to CREATE THE VERY CRISIS THEY'RE CLAIMING TO INFORM YOU ABOUT.
 

pramod

Member
Oct 24, 2017
1,542
1,225
290
The bolded is SUPER false. The economy during that time was exploding to amazing levels of good, so we as a country talked about it a lot less. Just remember that the Rodney King beating and the O.J. trial both happened in the early to mid-90s and race was all over tv about those two things.
Yeah but all I remember are those two things. These days it feels like theres a new major race crisis every week.
 

YIKES

Member
Aug 17, 2018
75
39
150
Not a good look
The bolded is SUPER false. The economy during that time was exploding to amazing levels of good, so we as a country talked about it a lot less. Just remember that the Rodney King beating and the O.J. trial both happened in the early to mid-90s and race was all over tv about those two things.
I agree with him in that the 90's seemed to have been a live-and-let-live era, people just left each other alone and the media wasn't all-in on creating an adverserial culture.
 

synchronicity

Member
Dec 16, 2011
1,942
709
530
People will dislike or hate others for all sorts of petty reasons. All racism and hatred is rooted in fear, and fear is not going away. The best anyone can do is to not hate those who harbor hatred. Having compassion for those without it may seem counter-intuitive, but the road to peace has no anger, vengeance or bitterness.
 

DeafTourette

Member
Apr 23, 2018
992
648
240
deaftourette.com
Yeah but all I remember are those two things. These days it feels like theres a new major race crisis every week.
Because racism was ignored except for a few instances like the Asian lady killing the little girl at that store in LA. Also,NOW we have cell phone cameras and the internet. We barely had an internet in the 90s.
 

DeafTourette

Member
Apr 23, 2018
992
648
240
deaftourette.com
Ignoring racists and racism won't make them go away. Ignoring them makes them stronger because they build their numbers up as long as you ignore them and no one is looking.

We can't police thoughts (thankfully) but we can teach ACCURATE history and LISTEN to each other.
 

Whataburger

Milk Connoisseur
Feb 2, 2018
3,485
1,994
395
People will dislike or hate others for all sorts of petty reasons. All racism and hatred is rooted in fear, and fear is not going away. The best anyone can do is to not hate those who harbor hatred. Having compassion for those without it may seem counter-intuitive, but the road to peace has no anger, vengeance or bitterness.
Sadly the last person that said that was shot to death and since then nobody has tried to follow in his footsteps. Ultimately giving into hate and a you vs us mentality.
 

Super Mario

Member
Nov 12, 2016
805
858
250
"Racism" is largely an issue created by the left to stir up political support. Racism isn't nearly as big as it is made to be. A look at human psychology will tell you that humans are tribal beings. With that said, humans don't like cultures they don't understand. It can get "better," but will never go away.

Racism would mean to hate people based off of their ethnicity/skin color. Is that REALLY why some don't like minorities? There are some perceptions that may or may not be true. How do they go away? Do we just put up a big love hashtag? What is the best evidence we have of racism in the media? Edited videos of black people being shot by cops while resisting. It's really a shame that there's so many people who don't see what is really going on there. We were definitely on a better path to understanding. We have gone completely the wrong way with no solution in sight.
 
Last edited:

Zog

Member
Oct 24, 2017
2,181
1,126
225
If you realistically want to reduce racism you need to start ignoring race and stop dividing people into groups based on race and treat people as individuals but equal. Funny thing is, being colorblind is considered racism today and we wonder why things aren't getting better.
 
Last edited:

Coffe Time

Member
Feb 19, 2018
198
95
170
Racism has been used as a tool by Republicans to appeal to disenfranchised white voters. It's persisting today because of decades of coded language that has been built into society and people often dont think about it. I'm sure many people here are familiar with this concept:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_strategy
This has been implemented in various ways, but the biggest most effective use was the push for the war on drugs which put this fake problem in the forefront of many American minds as their top concerns. "Inner city crime and drugs are as problem. Welfare is being taken advantage of by "welfare queens"." And who does this affect more than anyone else? Black people. This was so much on the public mind, democrats started adopting the platform of what to do about this war on drugs instead of not taking part at all.
Lee Atwater, a popular Republican strategist discussed the strategy himself in this infamous interview I'm sure many of you are aware of:
Suffice to say, the country is so entrenched in racism, its not going to be easy to not be racist. It requires a whole overhaul of our political system and a changing of the political thought.
 

mckmas8808

Member
May 24, 2005
40,251
3,196
1,320
If you realistically want to reduce racism you need to start ignoring race and stop dividing people into groups based on race and treat people as individuals but equal. Funny thing is, being colorblind is considered racism today and we wonder why things aren't getting better.
Why would I want people to not realize that I'm a black man? Should I expect people to ignore that I'm an English speaking person? Should I expect people to not realize that I'm a man? Race is an identifier of who you biologically are. The same as someone with blue eyes, is a person with blue eyes. Should we act like we don't recognize that this person has blue eyes? Should I act like they were brown eyes?

The answer can't be to erase one of the clearest identifiers of a person's skin color or facial features. It's super easy to recognize someone is white, but then wonder who they are as a person next. The same way I'd recognize Tom Cruise as a white guy that's also short. Makes no sense to fake it and act like I can't tell how short Tom Cruise is.
 

llien

Gold Member
Feb 1, 2017
4,416
1,702
475
Racism isn't an issue in Japan? It only isn't an issue because there are so few there that aren't Japanese.
Because it is technically impossible to BECOME Japanese, you can only be born Japanese.
The laws, which, cough, hardly result from loving non-Japanese... :)
 
Last edited:

Whataburger

Milk Connoisseur
Feb 2, 2018
3,485
1,994
395
Because it is technically impossible to BECOME Japanese, you can only be born Japanese.
The laws, which, cough, hardly result from loving non-Japanese... :)


Moral of the story? Never choose Nep over Vert.
 

Blood Borne

Member
Oct 30, 2017
998
915
225
Racism is a non issue. People are so determined to push this idea that racism is ubiquitous and is affecting people from achieving their goals. This is demonstrably false. I’m proof of it. I’m an immigrant from West Africa.

Racism does not prevent you from going to school, going to the library and studying hard, not committing crime, being a law abiding citizen, treating your fellow man with respect and courtesy, exercising, treating your girlfriend with respect, not abandoning her and your child, etc. All the aforementioned are personal responsibilities/values and externalities such as racism doesn’t prevent you from doing it.

Racism is a cop out for people who afraid to admit their failures and shortcomings.
 

mckmas8808

Member
May 24, 2005
40,251
3,196
1,320
Why do you want people to judge you by your race?
No not "judge" me. But recognize it. Just because you realize I'm black, doesn't mean you have to make a judgement one way or another. It's the exact same thing you'll do if you were talking to a woman with blonde hair. You'd "see" she has blonde hair. And that's it! Nothing more, nothing less.
 

Zog

Member
Oct 24, 2017
2,181
1,126
225
No not "judge" me. But recognize it. Just because you realize I'm black, doesn't mean you have to make a judgement one way or another. It's the exact same thing you'll do if you were talking to a woman with blonde hair. You'd "see" she has blonde hair. And that's it! Nothing more, nothing less.
You wouldn't even know that I 'realized you are black' if I don't acknowledge it or treat you differently so why do you want me to 'realize it'. Do you want to be treated differently because you are black?
 

DeafTourette

Member
Apr 23, 2018
992
648
240
deaftourette.com
You wouldn't even know that I 'realized you are black' if I don't acknowledge it or treat you differently so why do you want me to 'realize it'. Do you want to be treated differently because you are black?
I think what he's saying is what I would say ...

Recognize that I'm black and that I have a culture within a culture but treat me the same as you would those who are white. Just like I treat everyone with basic respect but recognize that they aren't black and we have some cultural differences.
 

Zog

Member
Oct 24, 2017
2,181
1,126
225
I think what he's saying is what I would say ...

Recognize that I'm black and that I have a culture within a culture but treat me the same as you would those who are white. Just like I treat everyone with basic respect but recognize that they aren't black and we have some cultural differences.
Recognize without action or acknowledgement?
 

DeafTourette

Member
Apr 23, 2018
992
648
240
deaftourette.com
Racism is a non issue. People are so determined to push this idea that racism is ubiquitous and is affecting people from achieving their goals. This is demonstrably false. I’m proof of it. I’m an immigrant from West Africa.

Racism does not prevent you from going to school, going to the library and studying hard, not committing crime, being a law abiding citizen, treating your fellow man with respect and courtesy, exercising, treating your girlfriend with respect, not abandoning her and your child, etc. All the aforementioned are personal responsibilities/values and externalities such as racism doesn’t prevent you from doing it.

Racism is a cop out for people who afraid to admit their failures and shortcomings.
I am raising my son, who's almost 18, and have been there since before he was born. I have never committed a crime. The library was my second home.

But racism exists in this country. I've been called the N-word and denied a job, after being told over the phone that I've got it, when I showed up for my interview (didn't get to even take it).

Glad you've never experienced it.
 

Zog

Member
Oct 24, 2017
2,181
1,126
225
But racism exists in this country. I've been called the N-word and denied a job, after being told over the phone that I've got it, when I showed up for my interview (didn't get to even take it).
That's because someone 'recognized' you by your race and treated you differently.
 

DeepEnigma

Member
Dec 3, 2013
19,695
14,521
585
Why would I want people to not realize that I'm a black man? Should I expect people to ignore that I'm an English speaking person? Should I expect people to not realize that I'm a man? Race is an identifier of who you biologically are. The same as someone with blue eyes, is a person with blue eyes. Should we act like we don't recognize that this person has blue eyes? Should I act like they were brown eyes?

The answer can't be to erase one of the clearest identifiers of a person's skin color or facial features. It's super easy to recognize someone is white, but then wonder who they are as a person next. The same way I'd recognize Tom Cruise as a white guy that's also short. Makes no sense to fake it and act like I can't tell how short Tom Cruise is.
From my understanding, and this was when I first heard "color blind" decades ago, is that it is not used because one does not recognize your ethnicity or race, it is that those who say they are "color blind" do not define who you are by those attributes, but rather, define you by your character.

Morgan Freeman had a good interview on it.
 

DunDunDunpachi

Patient MembeR
Apr 18, 2018
9,028
15,310
665
USA
dunpachi.com
I am raising my son, who's almost 18, and have been there since before he was born. I have never committed a crime. The library was my second home.

But racism exists in this country. I've been called the N-word and denied a job, after being told over the phone that I've got it, when I showed up for my interview (didn't get to even take it).

Glad you've never experienced it.
I'm sorry to hear about that. Did you report that employer and sue their pants off? We do have laws in place to help with this sort of thing.

There will always be racists, but I do agree with the sentiment in this thread that we don't have as big of a racism (as in, systemic racism) problem as people would like to believe. When you can be kicked off your show (Roseanne), fired from your own company (Papa John), lose your cooking brand (Paula Deen), lose your position as host (Don Imus), and elect a black president twice in a row, just to name a few big cases, it tells me that society responds very harshly towards racism.

Then you have Twitter mobs and Antifa who have no problem going after anyone they perceive to be racists: doxxing, vandalism, marches, protests, job loss, public humiliation, and violence follow in their wake. Then there's the news cycle which very openly denounces racism and will hunt people down and insinuate they are racists based on comments or past behavior. Above and beyond our laws against racism, we have very negative social reactions to examples of racism.

What are the racists themselves doing, though? Not much of anything. I'd say they are getting rooted out of society pretty openly. In fact, we're calling things "racist" that have never before been considered racist, just like we're calling things "violence" that have never before been considered violence.

The notion that we aren't responding harshly enough to racism really scares me. What's the next escalation if this isn't harsh enough?
 
Last edited:

Catphish

Gold Member
Jan 13, 2017
1,563
1,698
400
Chicago, IL, USA
Racism is a non issue. People are so determined to push this idea that racism is ubiquitous and is affecting people from achieving their goals. This is demonstrably false. I’m proof of it. I’m an immigrant from West Africa.

Racism does not prevent you from going to school, going to the library and studying hard, not committing crime, being a law abiding citizen, treating your fellow man with respect and courtesy, exercising, treating your girlfriend with respect, not abandoning her and your child, etc. All the aforementioned are personal responsibilities/values and externalities such as racism doesn’t prevent you from doing it.

Racism is a cop out for people who afraid to admit their failures and shortcomings.
I think I love you, West African Man.
 

DeepEnigma

Member
Dec 3, 2013
19,695
14,521
585
Racism is a non issue. People are so determined to push this idea that racism is ubiquitous and is affecting people from achieving their goals. This is demonstrably false. I’m proof of it. I’m an immigrant from West Africa.

Racism does not prevent you from going to school, going to the library and studying hard, not committing crime, being a law abiding citizen, treating your fellow man with respect and courtesy, exercising, treating your girlfriend with respect, not abandoning her and your child, etc. All the aforementioned are personal responsibilities/values and externalities such as racism doesn’t prevent you from doing it.

Racism is a cop out for people who afraid to admit their failures and shortcomings.
“You are personally responsible for becoming more ethical than the society you grew up in.”

Eliezer Yudkowsky
 

mckmas8808

Member
May 24, 2005
40,251
3,196
1,320
Recognize without action or acknowledgement?
Yes. Exactly.

From my understanding, and this was when I first heard "color blind" decades ago, is that it is not used because one does not recognize your ethnicity or race, it is that those who say they are "color blind" do not define who you are by those attributes, but rather, define you by your character.

Morgan Freeman had a good interview on it.
That might be how Morgan feels about the "color blind" term. But many I've heard say it act like they honestly didn't notice if a person was black or brown. It sounded so silly.
 

DeepEnigma

Member
Dec 3, 2013
19,695
14,521
585
That might be how Morgan feels about the "color blind" term. But many I've heard say it act like they honestly didn't notice if a person was black or brown. It sounded so silly.
That is how a lot of us from when the word came about on up until the current IdPol divide have always known it. Those who you describe, are just silly changing things to suit a world-view, like a lot of common words they are doing to, today. People need to educate rather than be a revisionist based on feelings.

Color blindness, in sociology, is a concept describing the ideal of a society where racial classifications do not limit a person's opportunities, as well as the kind of deliberately race-neutral governmental policies said to promote the goal of racial equality. This ideal was important to the Civil Rights Movement and international anti-racist movements of the 1950s and 1960s.[1]

The goal of 1960s civil-rights legislation in the United States was to remove racial discrimination and so establish a race-neutral standard. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s central hope was that people would someday be judged by "the content of their character" rather than "the color of their skins".[2] Whether this process has truly resulted in a color-blind U.S. society, or whether color-blind policies provide the best means of achieving racial equality, remains controversial.[1]
Racial color blindness reflects an ideal society in which skin color is insignificant. The ideal was most forcefully articulated in the context of the Civil Rights Movement and International Anti-racist movements of the 1950s and 1960s.[3]Advocates for color blindness argue that persons should be judged not by their skin color but rather by "the content of their character", in the words of Martin Luther King Jr.[3] Color-blind ideology is based on tenets of non-discrimination, due process of law, equal protection under the law, and equal opportunities regardless of race, ideas which have strongly influenced Western liberalism in the post-World War II period.[4]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_blindness_(race)

This is pretty much how I have always viewed it. Then again, I was educated at a different time where facts/meaning of words still mattered compared to now.
 
Last edited:

mckmas8808

Member
May 24, 2005
40,251
3,196
1,320
Help me understand why you want to me to recognize your skin color but not acknowledge it nor treat you any differently due to it.
I'm not sure how tall you are, but if you met a 7-foot guy, would you realize that an abnormally tall guy was standing in front of you?
 

Zog

Member
Oct 24, 2017
2,181
1,126
225
I'm not sure how tall you are, but if you met a 7-foot guy, would you realize that an abnormally tall guy was standing in front of you?
Being black is not abnormal. I wouldn't treat a 7 foot guy better or worse because of his height.

Let me try to explain it to you this way. I have no use for recognizing your skin color therefore I give it no consideration at all. There is just nothing game changing about your skin color to make me care about your skin color. You tell me I should 'recognize' but you can't tell me why.
 

mckmas8808

Member
May 24, 2005
40,251
3,196
1,320
Being black is not abnormal. I wouldn't treat a 7 foot guy better or worse because of his height.

Let me try to explain it to you this way. I have no use for recognizing your skin color therefore I give it no consideration at all. There is just nothing game changing about your skin color to make me care about your skin color. You tell me I should 'recognize' but you can't tell me why.
I told you why. You aren't reading well enough. I know for a fact that you are lying right now. If you were in an elevator with 5 other black people, you'd notice. To fake it like you have no idea the race of a person is straight up wack.
 

Zog

Member
Oct 24, 2017
2,181
1,126
225
I told you why. You aren't reading well enough. I know for a fact that you are lying right now. If you were in an elevator with 5 other black people, you'd notice. To fake it like you have no idea the race of a person is straight up wack.
If you were one of the black people in the elevator, how would you know if I noticed or not if I didn't acknowledge it or act differently? Further, if I did notice, how would it benefit you or why would you care if I noticed your skin color or not.

Suppose you come in for an interview and I notice that you are black but I don't care and this changes nothing. Now suppose you come in for an interview and I don't notice that you are black and this also changes nothing. You see how noticing or recognizing is not useful in any way if it changes nothing?
 
Last edited:

Blood Borne

Member
Oct 30, 2017
998
915
225
I am raising my son, who's almost 18, and have been there since before he was born. I have never committed a crime. The library was my second home.

But racism exists in this country. I've been called the N-word and denied a job, after being told over the phone that I've got it, when I showed up for my interview (didn't get to even take it).

Glad you've never experienced it.
Could you please elaborate.
The interviewer called you the N word?
Also, what hard proof do you have that you were not given the job because of your race?

I came here with no tangible skills. I self taught myself Microsoft Excel and SQL via textbooks and YouTube, which gave me a decent job. Later on, I self taught myself python and golang and I’m now working in a startup in U.K.

My brother, sister and Mum have similar stories as well. Perseverance, hardwork and discipline has given us a good life. I’m sorry but no one can convince me that they have good skills and can’t find a job.
 

manfestival

Member
Nov 12, 2009
10,202
928
730
I like how racism here always starts and ends with white and black. This seems to be a topic about racism in general. Which would mean discussing the issue as a whole and not pigeonholing ourselves(I would assume).
Unfortunately racism is a global issue or rather... a mankind issue. I was once refused service with a friend of mine simply because he looked foreign and have him told to go back to my own country by a little kid, that I did not belong. These issues did not occur while in the United States or with white people.

Side note: Anime is evil.
 

mckmas8808

Member
May 24, 2005
40,251
3,196
1,320
If you were one of the black people in the elevator, how would you know if I noticed or not if I didn't acknowledge it or act differently? Further, if I did notice, how would it benefit you or why would you care if I noticed your skin color or not.

Suppose you come in for an interview and I notice that you are black but I don't care and this changes nothing. Now suppose you come in for an interview and I don't notice that you are black and this also changes nothing. You see how noticing or recognizing is not useful in any way if it changes nothing?
You don't understand how society works. Thanks for demonstrating that. People that acknowledge (if only mentally) but also accepts will people different then them tend to be more open to people that look like me. I don't trust people that act like they don't recognize something that's very obvious and clear.

If I was walking into a building and someone in a wheelchair got to the door 2 seconds after me, I'd slow down and hold the door for them and "make sure" they got in smoothly. I'd do that because I recognized that they were handicapped. If I pretended that they were able-bodied, then maybe that person struggles to get through the door more than they should have.
 

Zog

Member
Oct 24, 2017
2,181
1,126
225
You don't understand how society works. Thanks for demonstrating that. People that acknowledge (if only mentally) but also accepts will people different then them tend to be more open to people that look like me. I don't trust people that act like they don't recognize something that's very obvious and clear.
You are just looking for racism where there is none.
If I was walking into a building and someone in a wheelchair got to the door 2 seconds after me, I'd slow down and hold the door for them and "make sure" they got in smoothly. I'd do that because I recognized that they were handicapped. If I pretended that they were able-bodied, then maybe that person struggles to get through the door more than they should have.
Being black is not a handicap.
 

DeafTourette

Member
Apr 23, 2018
992
648
240
deaftourette.com
Could you please elaborate.
The interviewer called you the N word?
Also, what hard proof do you have that you were not given the job because of your race?

I came here with no tangible skills. I self taught myself Microsoft Excel and SQL via textbooks and YouTube, which gave me a decent job. Later on, I self taught myself python and golang and I’m now working in a startup in U.K.

My brother, sister and Mum have similar stories as well. Perseverance, hardwork and discipline has given us a good life. I’m sorry but no one can convince me that they have good skills and can’t find a job.
No, the interviewer didn't call me that. It was someone who called me that in college. Broke my heart because at THAT time I didn't believe there was any racism anymore.

The only proof I have is what I said happened. You sound like a hand waver with that qualifier.

I have a job now, my own apt, etc.

Also, please don't tell me you're one of those "bootstrap" folks... No one gets through life ALONE
 

Blood Borne

Member
Oct 30, 2017
998
915
225
No, the interviewer didn't call me that. It was someone who called me that in college. Broke my heart because at THAT time I didn't believe there was any racism anymore.

The only proof I have is what I said happened. You sound like a hand waver with that qualifier.

I have a job now, my own apt, etc.

Also, please don't tell me you're one of those "bootstrap" folks... No one gets through life ALONE
Dude, I have had no government assistance. The only help rendered to me was my friend who allowed me to stay with him for almost two years. That’s the only help I’ve ever had.

You’re pretty much agreeing with me. Someone calling you a racial slur in college didn’t stop you from doing well today. A couple of months back, me and brother had a racial slur hurled at us at the traffic light, but again, how does that stop me from being a decent human being? Seriously how?

Also you can’t claim racism when you don’t have hard proof. But even if it was racism, you tried other places and eventually got a job. Just because someone calls you racial slur means you should start committing crimes, ignoring your responsibilities and not try to better yourself. People who do that are pathetic.

There loads of help, from affirmative action to free school to housing to almost everything, what other assistance does one need?
 

DeafTourette

Member
Apr 23, 2018
992
648
240
deaftourette.com
Dude, I have had no government assistance. The only help rendered to me was my friend who allowed me to stay with him for almost two years. That’s the only help I’ve ever had.

You’re pretty much agreeing with me. Someone calling you a racial slur in college didn’t stop you from doing well today. A couple of months back, me and brother had a racial slur hurled at us at the traffic light, but again, how does that stop me from being a decent human being? Seriously how?

Also you can’t claim racism when you don’t have hard proof. But even if it was racism, you tried other places and eventually got a job. Just because someone calls you racial slur means you should start committing crimes, ignoring your responsibilities and not try to better yourself. People who do that are pathetic.

There loads of help, from affirmative action to free school to housing to almost everything, what other assistance does one need?
Considering it was YEARS ago, no, I don't have proof enough for you.

And help... Help comes from friends, colleagues,family... Pointing you in the right direction, mentioning knowing someone whom you can talk with to get the ball rolling, even a boss who wants to help you make an extra buck... There's more ways to help but I am sleepy and on my way to work. Point is... In life NO ONE gets anywhere all by their lonesome. Not even the rich!

Also, since you're from/in another country and not from the US, my experiences will vary WILDLY from yours (poverty can make people do things to survive but it's more complicated than that). I live in a largely immigrant community and these folks are very law abiding (save for some instances)... But I also grew up in a very law abiding all black very low middle class/almost poverty neighborhood. So this reminds me of home.

I have had to use government assistance to make ends meet when I had no job (it's sometimes harder to get a job when you're deaf) and even when I did. I'm a parent so I had to have some help.

And being called a slur doesn't or shouldn't stop you from being a decent human being. It can make you angry and sad and try to get recompense (or even revenge) but that's neither here nor there. Point is, once or twice is nothing in the grand scheme of things. But if it happens A LOT... I can see it changing a person.