• Hey, guest user. Hope you're enjoying NeoGAF! Have you considered registering for an account? Come join us and add your take to the daily discourse.

Cornell University votes to change name of English department to "the department of literatures in English" in order to combat structural racism

EviLore

Expansive Ellipses
Staff Member
May 30, 2004
27,581
61,140
2,395


"
The English department at Cornell University has voted to change its name in an effort to distinguish English the language from English the nationality.

The department at the Ivy League university in New York voted to change its name to “the department of literatures in English” during its first faculty meeting of the fall semester earlier this month, the student-led Cornell Daily Sun reported Wednesday.

The change would help to eliminate the “conflation of English as a language and English as a nationality,”
English professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies Kate McCullough told the newspaper.

The proposal, co-written by English professor Carole Boyce-Davies, was spurred by the wave of racial and political unrest following the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Ms. Boyce-Davies told the Daily Sun.

“Faculty around the country — not just faculty of color, but faculty in general — began to look at the institution to see how we can help advance a discourse that challenges structural forms of racism which get reproduced in students and in teaching over and over again,” Ms. Boyce-Davies said.

“What surprised us was the fact that so many of the White faculty of the English department signed on — we were amazed,” she added. “By the time we were ready to officially take it to the department as a whole, we had over 75 percent of the faculty signed on.”

Ms. Boyce-Davies said English professor and department chair Caroline Levine signed the proposal without hesitation.

“I think leadership matters,” Ms. Levine told the paper. “This isn’t just us doing a symbolic gesture, this is in keeping with the University’s call to have us really rethink our everyday practices around racism.”

According to the Daily Sun, a significant majority of the department approved the change, and they are now awaiting approval from college administration.
"


 

Zefah

Gold Member
Jan 7, 2007
41,434
17,610
1,585
That’s the dumbest thing I’ve ever seen, and I’ve seen cucks on this website defend Biden.
Check out what's on the ballot for 2020 here in Washington state!



If adopted, Charter Amendment No. 3 would replace references in the Preamble, Section 260 and Section 800 of the charter from "citizen" to "public," "member of the public" or "resident."
The Preamble lists the purposes for the charter.
If Charter Amendment No. 3 is adopted, the reference to "effective citizen participation" in the Preamble would be changed to "effective public participation."
Section 260 concerns the office of citizen complaints. If adopted, Charter Amendment No. 3 would change this to the office of public complaints and the reference to complaints by a "citizen of the county" would be changed to a "member of the public."
Section 800 concerns charter review and amendment. If adopted, Charter Amendment No. 3 would change the reference for appointments to the charter review commission from “citizens” to “residents” and refer to it as a “resident commission” rather than a “citizen commission.”
 

EviLore

Expansive Ellipses
Staff Member
May 30, 2004
27,581
61,140
2,395
The two ladies spearheading this at Cornell are below. Quick, guess what their specialties are.

One's a Gender/Queer Studies Marxist focused on "queering our understanding of time" and the other is an African Studies Marxist.


"
I hold a joint appointment in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and English. My book, Regions of Identity: The Construction of America in Women's Fiction, 1885-1914 (Stanford University Press, 1999) examines the contribution of women's fictions to cultural discourses of national identity and offers a comparative analysis of the impact of race, gender, ethnicity, sexuality and region in this fiction.

I am currently completing a book manuscript, tentatively titled Never On Time, But Always in Time: Queer Temporalities and Narrative Form, that is working at the intersections among gender, sexuality, ethnicity and diaspora in twentieth- and twenty-first century queer fiction. Queer studies has seen an explosion in the past two decades of work on queer temporality; critics have explored whatqueer time might mean and do, producing critiques of the ways that structures of time, routinized and rendered “natural,” do ideological work in theservice of both the state and the heteronuclear family, and suggesting that queering our understanding of time can help us envision temporal modesbeyond the time of capitalism or the bourgeois family. Against this backdrop, my book project examines the multiple functions of queer temporality in contemporary US fiction, exploring the way in which attempts to represent queer time both enable and demand reworkings of narrative form. In examining queer subjects who grapple with exile, diaspora, transnational migration and even mundane family dissolution, this project considers the status of thequeered body’s senses, desires, and histories in a group of texts that deploy the body as a vehicle for the enactment of queer temporality. Taken together, these texts move well beyond simply revealing the heteronormative stakes and ramifications of normative temporality (though they do this, too); they are also uninterested in simply rejecting History or replacing it with a celebratory queer History. In deviating from conventional temporality—both at thelevel of the story and the level of the form—these texts produce a topo-temporal opening for something else, an alternative experience of the past, present, or future and a body’s queered relationship to one or all.

A part of this project was recently published as “The complexity of loss itself’: Comics Form and Fun Home’s Queer Reparative Temporality,” in American Literature in June 2018. The article appeared in a special issue on queer comics, edited by Darieck Scott and Ramzi Fawaz.
"


"
Carole Boyce Davies is a professor of English and Africana Studies. She has held distinguished professorships at a number of institutions, including the Herskovits Professor of African Studies and Professor of Comparative Literary Studies and African American Studies at Northwestern University. She is the author of Black Women, Writing and Identity: Migrations of the Subject (Routledge, 1994) and Left of Karl Marx: The Political Life of Black Communist Claudia Jones (Duke University Press, 2008). In addition to numerous scholarly articles, Boyce Davies has also published the following critical anthologies: Ngambika: Studies of Women in African Literature (Africa World Press, 1986); Out of the Kumbla: Caribbean Women and Literature (Africa World Press, 1990); and a two-volume collection of critical and creative writing entitled Moving Beyond Boundaries (New York University Press, 1995): International Dimensions of Black Women’s Writing (volume 1), and Black Women’s Diasporas (volume 2). She is co-editor with Ali Mazrui and Isidore Okpewho of The African Diaspora: African Origins and New World Identities (Indiana University Press, 1999) and Decolonizing the Academy: African Diaspora Studies (Africa World Press, 2003). She is general editor of the three-volume, The Encyclopedia of the African Diaspora (Oxford: ABC-CLIO, 2008), and of Claudia Jones: Beyond Containment: Autobiography, Essays, Poetry (Banbury: Ayebia, 2011). Her most recent monograph is Caribbean Spaces: Escape Routes from Twilight Zones (Illinois, 2013) and a children’s book, Walking (EducaVision, 2016).
"
 

LordCBH

Member
Jun 4, 2020
942
2,330
380
Check out what's on the ballot for 2020 here in Washington state!



If adopted, Charter Amendment No. 3 would replace references in the Preamble, Section 260 and Section 800 of the charter from "citizen" to "public," "member of the public" or "resident."
The Preamble lists the purposes for the charter.
If Charter Amendment No. 3 is adopted, the reference to "effective citizen participation" in the Preamble would be changed to "effective public participation."
Section 260 concerns the office of citizen complaints. If adopted, Charter Amendment No. 3 would change this to the office of public complaints and the reference to complaints by a "citizen of the county" would be changed to a "member of the public."
Section 800 concerns charter review and amendment. If adopted, Charter Amendment No. 3 would change the reference for appointments to the charter review commission from “citizens” to “residents” and refer to it as a “resident commission” rather than a “citizen commission.”
what the fuck. How can they just say “ok we’re changing this document because fuck you”?
 

Stilton Disco

Member
Aug 22, 2014
6,693
6,804
780
England
Arbitrarily changing language works to make conversations and sharing of ideas more difficult, and further polarises both sides of the political isle, as they can no longer communicate and share ideas.

Additionally, making innocent, universally understood words and phrases into 'offence traps' that non believers will fall into, allows an easy angle of attack against those non believers, that quickly exposes them and ostricises them from any discourse, while falsely labeling them as bigots whose ideas must be ignored.
 

BadBurger

Gold Member
Nov 6, 2019
1,555
2,177
505
"The department of literatures in English" sounds like what "English Department" would be translated to from a non-romance language.

One, I fail to see any racism in the term, structural or otherwise. Second, when someone says "I am an English major" or "I am an English teacher", everyone knows what they mean, even if trying to define it precisely may lead to an amorphous answer depending upon who you ask. An education in English also covers more than just literary studies.

Eh.