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Coronavirus Global Pandemic |OT| Wuhan!! Got You All In Check

Sakura

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There was always "too much of" something, that had been eliminated by mass vaccinations.
The ability of that "something" to mutate is crucial here, and C19 isn't one of the too flexible types.
What are some of these viruses wiped out by mass vaccinations? Smallpox? Polio? Neither had nearly as many cases in a single year as Coronavirus (though they were much worse viruses). They are also very different viruses. Coronavirus may mutate slower than the influenza virus, but it still mutates much faster than Smallpox (which is a DNA virus) or Polio. Not to mention more cases of coronavirus = more chance to mutate.

And we have no idea how long immunity will last either. In diseases that have been eradicated, immunity from vaccines lasts for years, even lifetime for some. The jury is still out on how long coronavirus immunity will last.
 

arkhamguy123

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Seasonal virus jabs are made against a family of easily mutating viruses.
Since they mutate a lot, there is a wild variety of them.
Typical jabs contains a cocktail aimed at a handful of those viruses, that are expected to be the "most popular" in a given year.

C19 is very different. It doesn't mutate so wildly. We could kill it for good, as with SARS/MERS.
Well said. I will say it is disheartening to see infection rates hit the winter surge peak. And it feels very cognitively dissonant as the USA and the UK are crushing it with vaccines and having infection rates drop far off from the winter peak. Save for a few states. And other countries around the globe have it more or less beat. It really kind of is India and Brazil driving all that up right now to my knowledge. I anticipate a January-feburary falling off a cliff drop off of cases worldwide in the May-June or June-July range. Every wave ends after all.
 
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arkhamguy123

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Also when countries with slower vaccine rollouts get it together we as a society need to have a serious talk about what point do we stop giving a shit about cases. After deaths and hospitalizations subside and if cases still persist what happens. And yeah yeah I know I know "long covid" "more than just life and death." Trust me I know. Both of those reasons are why I haven't caught the virus and cause I've been on lockdown for over a year now. But as the years go on I don't see any alternative if cases just keep hitting but deaths and severe disease are down.
 

llien

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Neither had nearly as many cases in a single year as Coronavirus
But they were still massive.
Between 1868 and 1907, there were approximately 4.7 million deaths from smallpox in India.
In 1849 nearly 13% of all Calcutta deaths were due to smallpox.

Ability to mutate is the key and everything I heard was hinting at it not mutating that much.

On the vaccine protection side: for any practical purposes, about 1 year of near immunity that current vaccines provide is more than adequate to eradicate C19.
 

Jezbollah

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A small bump in the road - but given most of April here was focused on second doses from pooled vaccines, shouldn't be any dramas.
 
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Sakura

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But they were still massive.
Between 1868 and 1907, there were approximately 4.7 million deaths from smallpox in India.
In 1849 nearly 13% of all Calcutta deaths were due to smallpox.

Ability to mutate is the key and everything I heard was hinting at it not mutating that much.

On the vaccine protection side: for any practical purposes, about 1 year of near immunity that current vaccines provide is more than adequate to eradicate C19.
As I said, smallpox is a DNA virus. It has a MUCH lower mutation rate compared to something like covid-19. Even then, it took many years to eradicate it.
We have had over 100 million cases of coronavirus in a single year. Real number of infections is much higher. A vaccine that only lasted 1 year would not be more than adequate to eradicate it.
Very few widespread viruses that spread person to person have actually been wiped out by vaccines.
In any case, my original post was about giving reasons why yearly vaccinations might be a thing, I'm not saying that they will be. It is impossible to know at this point.
 
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arkhamguy123

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As I said, smallpox is a DNA virus. It has a MUCH lower mutation rate compared to something like covid-19. Even then, it took many years to eradicate it.
We have had over 100 million cases of coronavirus in a single year. Real number of infections is much higher. A vaccine that only lasted 1 year would not be more than adequate to eradicate it.
Very few widespread viruses that spread person to person have actually been wiped out by vaccines.
In any case, my original post was about giving reasons why yearly vaccinations might be a thing, I'm not saying that they will be. It is impossible to know at this point.
It'll become a seasonal endemic thing. We'll enjoy life like normal from like February to October then we'll have to get shots and be aware a risk of catching rona is out there. But as far as transforming society it won't do shit after the pandemic ends. Hell idiots didn't that even care DURING the pandemic. Will experience no change after cases collapse this year.
 
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Gp1

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Sep 17, 2019
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The Chilean Government released their estimated data on the Chinese Coronavac vaccine efficacy on their population, after more than 10 millions doses. So this isn't the same as the phase 3 clinical trial data.

The numbers are:
67% efficacy on prevent symptoms
85% to prevent hospitalizations
89% against severe cases which requires treatment in ICU;
80% against deaths.

Not bad at all.

source: in portuguese
 
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Game Analyst

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Video: Johan Giesecke one year on: did Sweden succeed?

One year ago, an interview with Professor Johan Giesecke of Sweden began to go viral on YouTube. It was early in the pandemic, and he was the most senior voice (as a former state epidemiologist of Sweden, Chief Scientist at the European Centre of Disease Control and advisor to the Director General of the WHO) to come out forcefully against lockdowns. He promised to come back in a year to review the evidence — and with typical Swedish punctuality, here he is.





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Guileless

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Jun 7, 2004
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Ontario enters harder lockdown, police get more powers as COVID cases soar​


TORONTO/OTTAWA (Reuters) -The Canadian province of Ontario expanded and extended a stay at home order on Friday and said police will be given new powers to stop and question people who leave home as expert advisors warned that new cases of COVID-19 will continue to soar, overwhelming hospitals.
 

ManaByte

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Ontario enters harder lockdown, police get more powers as COVID cases soar​


TORONTO/OTTAWA (Reuters) -The Canadian province of Ontario expanded and extended a stay at home order on Friday and said police will be given new powers to stop and question people who leave home as expert advisors warned that new cases of COVID-19 will continue to soar, overwhelming hospitals.
 
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llien

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Very few widespread viruses that spread person to person have actually been wiped out by vaccines.
All viruses with major impact that we have managed to develop vaccines against, have been wiped out.

C19 was reported as "slowly mutating" virus a number of times.
Biontech-Pfizer / Moderna vaccine have shown 70%+ effectivenes against all known mutations, even AZ has shown 50%.
So we have vaccines that are effective even against mutations of it.


Regarding jabs that last 1 year => protection lasting for one year makes it conceavable logistically to boost immunity of the population even if it takes more than a year to finish it off (as it stands, it will definitely take at least a year to get vaccine production capacity to the levels needed to be able to vaccinate entire planet within 1 year)

In any case, my original post was about giving reasons why yearly vaccinations might be a thing, I'm not saying that they will be. It is impossible to know at this point.
My point was that it is rather unlikely that we will need jabs once a year forever, but it's very likely we'd need one in 1 year, as pandemic won't be over yet.
 
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llien

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Video: Johan Giesecke one year on: did Sweden succeed?

It depends on whom you compare them to, actually.
There are neightbors (I think it was Denmark or Norway) with 0% spike of deaths vs Sweden's 11%.

On the other hand, there are countries like UK or Italy, with 15% and 18% spikes accordingly, that did much worse despite lockdowns.
 

Jezbollah

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We looking at the same numbers? I see sub 400 deaths and sub 45k cases.

The UK's numbers were 1882 cases, and 10 deaths yesterday. Scale that up to population difference (x4.8) then that would equal 9033 new cases, 48 deaths.

Given that the gap between the UK and the US for at least one dose per capita is currently 9% (48% vs 39% - although for most of this month the UK's focus has been on second jabs) then you can see why I might raise an eyebrow at 45k/400 as being something to celebrate. Unless there's a serious lag effect for the US I (probably) haven't appreciated.
 
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arkhamguy123

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The UK's numbers were 1882 cases, and 10 deaths yesterday. Scale that up to population difference (x4.8) then that would equal 9033 new cases, 48 deaths.

Given that the gap between the UK and the US for at least one dose per capita is currently 9% (48% vs 39% - although for most of this month the UK's focus has been on second jabs) then you can see why I might raise an eyebrow at 45k/400 as being something to celebrate. Unless there's a serious lag effect for the US I (probably) haven't appreciated.
Forgetting one thing. More of the USA is wide open than the UK and the USA has a greater population of virus flaunting shitheads. I'd say all things considering our numbers are fine.
 

Jezbollah

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Forgetting one thing. More of the USA is wide open than the UK and the USA has a greater population of virus flaunting shitheads. I'd say all things considering our numbers are fine.

One thing I forgot to consider but remembered now is that the approach for the vaccine in the UK is focused on the more vulnerable age groups - it seems more open to all demographics in the US - this will of course have an impact on the figures!
 
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Bluntman

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Just got the blood clot AstraZeneca jab. As far as I can tell, this vaccine is sort of finished in continental Europe.

My doctor put on Facebook that they've got 20 jabs of Astra left in town on a first come first served basis. I asked her how come she put this on Facebook, and she told me that they made at least 200 phone calls and everybody discarded this vaccine.

So because of this non-existant blood clot stupidity I got the vaccine before someone that should've got it instead (I'm 33 and healthy as a clam). Not that I care, I want to go to a pub as soon possible (obviously I'll wait the 3 weeks period for it to work).
 
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Rbk_3

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Just got the blood clot AstraZeneca jab. As far as I can tell, this vaccine is sort of finished in continental Europe.

My doctor put on Facebook that they've got 20 jabs of Astra left in town on a first come first served basis. I asked her how come she put this on Facebook, and she told me that they made at least 200 phone calls and everybody discarded this vaccine.

So because of this non-existant blood clot stupidity I got the vaccine before someone that should've got it instead (I'm 33 and healthy as a clam). Not that I care, I want to go to a pub as soon possible (obviously I'll wait the 3 weeks period for it to work).

In Ontario, it is down to 40 and older for the Astra one, so shit, it will probably be 30 and older soon and I am jumping on it right way also.
 
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Hulk_Smash

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The astra vaccine should go to 3rd world countries that desperately need it. Because if white northerners are going to be that fucking stupid, then they don’t deserve the extra vacc.
 
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Game Analyst

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Video: Priests speak out: vaccine passports would be un-Christian (4/20/21)

Over the weekend, a group of over 1,200 church leaders from a range of denominations sent an open letter to the Prime Minister. It warned that vaccine passports raised serious ethical concerns and risked creating a ‘surveillance state’ that would ‘bring about the end of liberal democracy as we know it’. We spoke to two of the original signatories — Rev Dr. William Philip, of the Tron church in Glasgow, and Rev Dr. Jamie Franklin, curator of St. George in the Meadow in Nottingham. In this interview, both offered a scathing assessment of the concept of vaccine passports and explained why they could not support it.

// Timecodes //
00:21 - Intro
01:11 - Why write the letter?
02:35 - Who signed it?
05:09 - Church closures
06:41 - Spiritual vs physical health
09:19 - Separation of church and state
10:14 - Vaccine passports
13:21 - What it means to be human
15:39 - Inevitability of death
19:04 - Christian ethical dilemmas with science
21:10 - Science as a new religion

 

Jezbollah

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The astra vaccine should go to 3rd world countries that desperately need it. Because if white northerners are going to be that fucking stupid, then they don’t deserve the extra vacc.

The funny thing is that I've seen a few reports of the EU about to authorise the Johnson & Johnson vaccine - that has the same issue, and odds of causing blood clots as Astrazenica. But of course, the EU haven't been shown up as incompetant when it comes to the J&J procurement so it's safe enough. lol

As for the AZ stock that EU countries don't want, people will be lining up around the block to buy it. Those same idiots won't have any objection to sell it if it means they can recoup their money. And as for the third world countries? Well the EU have already blocked as sizeable shipment for COVAX from Astrazenica. I doubt they'll want those countries to get any stock if it means they cant have warehouses of vaccines they dont want to use.
 
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Bluntman

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The funny thing is that I've seen a few reports of the EU about to authorise the Johnson & Johnson vaccine - that has the same issue, and odds of causing blood clots as Astrazenica. But of course, the EU haven't been shown up as incompetant when it comes to the J&J procurement so it's safe enough. lol

As for the AZ stock that EU countries don't want, people will be lining up around the block to buy it. Those same idiots won't have any objection to sell it if it means they can recoup their money. And as for the third world countries? Well the EU have already blocked as sizeable shipment for COVAX from Astrazenica. I doubt they'll want those countries to get any stock if it means they cant have warehouses of vaccines they dont want to use.

The EU already authorised the J&J vaccine (or Janssen, as we call it here), actually the first package arrived to Hungary last week, a staggering number of exactly 26.600 doses. But then J&J stopped the shipments because of the investigation in the US.

And there are already talks that the EU won't extend the contract with AstraZeneca and J&J beyond the vaccines already ordered.

As usual, the European Union politics is a world of utter incompetence and shitshow.
 
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12Goblins

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Yet, even after his own infection, Nugent isn't about to change his stance on COVID-19, especially when it comes to vaccines," Nugent says. "Nobody knows what's in it. If you can't even honestly answer our questions of exactly what's in it and why are you testing it on human beings and forcing it on people in such a short period of time."

wut
 

Batiman

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Feb 11, 2020
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Yet, even after his own infection, Nugent isn't about to change his stance on COVID-19, especially when it comes to vaccines," Nugent says. "Nobody knows what's in it. If you can't even honestly answer our questions of exactly what's in it and why are you testing it on human beings and forcing it on people in such a short period of time."

wut
Can’t stand this idiot but hope he’s alright
 

SlimySnake

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Was a little nauseous after Pfizer 2 but popped a couple extra strength Tylenol and it passed. Hopefully that’s it for a reaction.
when did it kick in? im going to a baseball game the same day im getting my second shot, and thinking of delaying it. dont know if i can make the 2 hour drive back all nauseas.
 

llien

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India stops exporting AZ (the only C19 vaccine they were exporting) amid surge in cases.

The funny thing is that I've seen a few reports of the EU about to authorise the Johnson & Johnson vaccine
As they did with AZ, which is, wait for it, IS STILL AUTHORIZED.

And, oh boy, UK itself suddenly discovered dead young people and stopped administering AZ jabs to them.
 
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