CREATINEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE

triplestation

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Dec 23, 2008
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i'm new to CREATINE and what i've learned is this:

it's affordable

people typically get around 1 gram from a typical normal diet, virtually NONE from a vegan diet..

and through creatine supplements about 5 GRAMS

TO GET 5 GRAMS OF CREATINE YOU'D NEED TO EAT A FUCKING 3 POUND STEAK

it's about the closest thing to steroids you can get, and that shit turns you into a sexual tyrannosaurus

makes you stronger and your muscles denser

THOUGHTS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 🤬🤬🤬
 
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TrainedRage

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Feb 3, 2018
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WEBMD...



How Safe Is Creatine?

Just because creatine is natural, doesn't necessarily mean that it is safe. Supplements aren't held to the same standards by the FDA as medications, which means you can't always know exactly what's in your supplement, or in what amounts.


Researchers still don't know the long-term effects of taking creatine supplements, especially in young people. Adolescents who take creatine often do so without their doctor's advice, which can cause them to take more than the recommended dose.


Although most healthy people can take it with no problem, creatine can, in rare cases, have adverse effects, particularly when used in excess. Side effects can include:



Certain drugs, including diabetes medications, anti-inflammatories like ibuprofen and naproxen, and diuretics, can have dangerous interactions with creatine. Taking the stimulants caffeine and ephedra with creatine can increase the risk of side effects.


Creatine isn't recommended for people with kidney or liver disease, or diabetes. Others who should avoid taking it are children under age 18 and women who are pregnant or nursing. Also don't use creatine if you are taking any medication or supplement that could affect your blood sugar, because creatine may also affect blood sugar levels.

If you do take creatine, drink enough water to prevent dehydration.

No matter how healthy you are, let your doctor know before you take creatine or any other supplement.

------------------------

Nah I will just eat meat and lift. I think it is safer now than it has been tho. Do you.
 
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NeoGiffer

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Nov 29, 2018
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i'm new to CREATINE and what i've learned is this:

it's affordable

people typically get around 1 gram from a typical normal diet, virtually NONE from a vegan diet..

and through creatine supplements about 5 GRAMS

TO GET 5 GRAMS OF CREATINE YOU'D NEED TO EAT A FUCKING 3 POUND STEAK

it's about the closest thing to steroids you can get, and that shit turns you into a sexual tyrannosaurus

makes you stronger and your muscles denser

THOUGHTS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 🤬🤬🤬
 

Kamina

Golden Boy
Jun 2, 2013
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Took it for some time. It stores water in the muscles making them bigger while supporting your power during training. However, i really hated swallowing these crystals, so i stopped.
 

DeafTourette

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Apr 23, 2018
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I took it before for almost a year while on P90X (that's how old I am) in my 30s. I got SWOLE! I lost some fat, gained muscle... but I still had the water weight (in the belly)... But I was more cut and I could feign thinness better ... But I lacked motivation to keep going. I need to get back into training (especially with the SynerStretch I used to be on... I could drop into a split on a dime... No warm-up needed).
 
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GorillaChilla

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Jun 26, 2019
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Creatine is safe, cheap and effective.
Another drug that is effective but more expensive is Ibutamoren.
 

Larogue

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Oct 24, 2005
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Careful with the blood pressure if you are 30+

I used to take it when I was younger, but can't now, as it rises my blood pressure through it's water retention effect.
 
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MrTickles

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Feb 22, 2018
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It can lead to hair loss but yeah creatine is legit.
Not proven. It is thought that simply going to the gym and training heavy increases testosterone by 15-20% and that causes hairloss in men with the genetic male pattern boldness.

i'm new to CREATINE and what i've learned is this:

it's affordable

people typically get around 1 gram from a typical normal diet, virtually NONE from a vegan diet..

and through creatine supplements about 5 GRAMS

TO GET 5 GRAMS OF CREATINE YOU'D NEED TO EAT A FUCKING 3 POUND STEAK

it's about the closest thing to steroids you can get, and that shit turns you into a sexual tyrannosaurus

makes you stronger and your muscles denser

THOUGHTS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 🤬🤬🤬
It's pretty much necessary if you want to see any gains naturally. All atheletes take it. It's great. All positives, no negatives outside of purposely overdosing and damaging your liver/kidneys. If you have diabetes or suffer from high blood pressure, keep the dosage very low (3-5 grams per day).

Creatine has too many benefits to list, but the key one is it helps your muscles retain water. And muscles filled with water are happy muscles. When super saturated they heal much quicker, they're stronger so you lift more so you can grow them more etc. This enables much more frequent and higher intensity training, which leads to increased testosterone production, which builds additional muscle, etc.

Took it years ago when I had roommates and ended up getting into vicious shouting matches with the one who really annoyed me. Before the creatine, I just tolerated him. The increased testosterone/aggression was real.

This has nothing to do with creatine directly. You were hitting the gym more effectively and this spiked you T-levels leading to increased aggression.

Without creatine I can do 3 sessions in the gym per week maximum and it almost kills me after a month. Sore as fuck, depleted, hurting. With creatine I can do 5 sessions for months, the party just keeps going and going.
 
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iorek21

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Feb 6, 2017
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Creatine is safe, as far as I know, it gives you a great boost not only during training but in other activities as well (yep, sex included). It will make you more thirsty tho, so don't forget to drink a lot of water.

The quantity you should take daily can be calculated like that:

Your Weight (KG) x 0.6/10

Taking more than that is a waste of product, your body will discard it.

I recommend using Universal Creatine, it's one of the best cost/benefit out there
 

iconmasterX

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Jan 27, 2018
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The "E" is silent. The preferred spelling would be

CREATIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINE
 

Ahjumbie

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Mar 26, 2013
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I used to take it when I was serious about bodybulding . I would cycle it (kinda like steroids) like 2 months on 1 month off not including the loading period. It worked for me , I guess I'm a responder, but it wasn't to like any great degree. I was able to get a rep or 2 extra , kickin' cussin' spittin' n' bitchin', but still a rep or 2 more.

I love how cheap it is because of how effective it is until I found out it's basically the crud that's left over from the whey protein process that they take and clean and synth this stuff from but still great.
 

CurryPanda

Formerly 'CyberPanda' formerly ‘CurryPanda’
Mar 4, 2019
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Creatine monohydrate

What is it?
A nonessential dietary element found in meat and fish (particularly herring, salmon, and tuna). Creatine can boost muscle mass and improve performance in weight lifting and other similar kinds of high-intensity exercise. It can also increase strength gains and aid in muscle recovery. Brands include GNC Pro Performance Creatine Monohydrate and NOW Sports Creatine Monohydrate Powder.



What you need to know:
  • The ingredient hasn’t been proven safe or effective in children or adolescents. Due to the unknown risks, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons advises that children and adolescents shouldn’t take creatine supplements.

  • Long-term studies in all age groups are needed, although creatine is probably safe when used by adults in reasonable amounts.

  • Adults should consume no more than 5 grams per day of supplemental creatine, according to a risk assessment published in 2006 in the journal Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology. Higher amounts have been linked to kidney damage, although the evidence isn’t conclusive.

  • Not everybody responds to the ingredient in the same way. People who have naturally higher stores of creatine in their muscles tend to not get an effect from supplementation.



Supplements Can Make You Sick

Dietary supplements are not regulated the same way as medications. This lack of oversight puts consumers' health at risk.

By Jeneen Interlandi
July 27, 2016

Calvin Jimmy Lee-White was tiny. He was born on Oct. 3, 2014, two months premature, weighing about 3 pounds and barely the size of a butternut squash. There are standards of care for treating infants that fragile, and as an attorney for the baby’s family later acknowledged, doctors at Yale-New Haven Hospital in Connecticut followed them. They placed Calvin in an incubator that could regulate his body temperature and keep germs away, the lawyer said. And they administered surfactant drugs, which help promote crucial lung development in premature infants. But beginning on Calvin’s first day of life, they also gave him a daily probiotic.

Probiotics are powders, liquids, or pills made up of live bacteria thought to help maintain the body’s natural balance of gut microorganisms. Some neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) have been giving them to preemies in recent years based on evidence that they can help ward off deadly intestinal disease.
Some doctors are concerned about that trend. Because probiotics can be classified as dietary supplements, they don’t have to be held to the same regulatory standards as prescription or even over-the-counter drugs. Manufacturers don’t have to secure Food and Drug Administration approval to sell their products, and their facilities aren’t policed the same way as pharmaceutical companies.

But the NICU at Yale-New Haven chose what looked to be a safe product. It was made by a large, seemingly reputable company, marketed specifically for infants and children, and available at drugstores across the country.

Calvin struggled anyway. His abdomen developed bulges, and surgeryrevealed that his intestines were overrun by a rare fungus. The infection spread quickly from his gut to his blood vessels, where it caused multiple blockages, and then into his aorta, where it caused a clot.
On Oct. 11, at just 8 days old, baby Calvin died. Government officials then launched a mournful investigation. Where did the fungus come from? And how did it get into this premature baby’s tiny body?

Unproven Treatments

The answer is that the probiotic was contaminated. The FDA tested unopened containers from the same batch of probiotic given to Calvin and discovered the same fungus that had infected his intestines. Certain lots of the product—ABC Dophilus Powder, made by the supplement manufacturer Solgar—were recalled from pharmacies and drugstores across the U.S.
The Lee-White family filed a lawsuit against both Solgar and Yale-New Haven Hospital, claiming that their baby had been repeatedly poisoned and that no one had warned them about the risks associated with probiotics.

“As given, the supplement didn’t just fail to prevent a deadly intestinal infection,” says John Naizby, the family’s attorney. “The supplement actually caused a deadly intestinal infection.” Solgar told Consumer Reports via email that it conducted a thorough investigation in cooperation with the FDA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and found no contaminants at any point in its own supply chain. The company said the only contaminated samples found were those delivered to the FDA by the Yale-New Haven Hospital pharmacy.

The hospital declined to comment for this article. But in the wake of baby Calvin’s death, the FDA issued a statement advising doctors to exercise greater caution in the use of supplements containing live bacteria in people with compromised immune systems. Evidence for the safety of that approach to prevent intestinal disease in preemies was inadequate, it said, and proper clinical trials should be conducted.

The problem stretches well beyond one tainted probiotic. Dietary supplements—vitamins, minerals, herbs, botanicals, and a growing list of other “natural” substances—have migrated from the vitamin aisle into the mainstream medical establishment. Hospitals are not only including supplements in their formularies (their lists of approved medication), they’re also opening their own specialty supplement shops on-site and online. Some doctors are doing the same. According to a Gallup survey of 200 physicians, 94 percent now recommend vitamins or minerals to some of their patients; 45 percent have recommended herbal supplements as well. And 7 percent are not only recommending supplements but actually selling them in their offices.

Consumers are buying those products in droves. According to the Nutrition Business Journal, supplement sales have increased by 81 percent in the past decade. The uptick is easy to understand: Supplements are easier to get than prescription drugs, and they carry the aura of being more natural and thus safer. Their labels often promise to address health issues for which there are few easy solutions. Want a smaller waistline? There’s garcinia cambogia for that. Bigger muscles? Try creatine. Better sex? Yohimbe. How about giving your brain a boost? Omega-3 fatty acids. Or your energy level? Ginseng.

It’s tough to say what portion of those products pose a risk to consumers. A 2013 report from the Government Accountability Office (GAO) found that from 2008 through 2011, the FDA received 6,307 reports of health problems from dietary supplements, including 92 deaths, hundreds of life-threatening conditions, and more than 1,000 serious injuries or illnesses. The GAO suggests that due to underreporting, the real number of incidents may be far greater.

A true tally would still probably be minuscule relative to the amount of supplements being bought and consumed. But there’s no reliable way to tell whether any given supplement is safe. And the fact remains that dietary supplements—which your doctor may recommend and may sit right alongside trusted over-the-counter medications or just across from the prescription drug counter—aren’t being regulated the same way as drugs.
“Not only are the advertised ingredients of some supplements potentially dangerous,” says Pieter Cohen, M.D., an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School who has studied supplements extensively and written many papers on the issue, “but because of the way they’re regulated, you often have no idea what you’re actually ingesting.”


More at this link:

 
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Samsomite

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Oct 24, 2018
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More at this link:

Why would something that you can get from meat make you sick? 🤔

Are you one of those people against vaccination and drugs as well?
 

triplestation

Member
Dec 23, 2008
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Why would something that you can get from meat make you sick? 🤔

Are you one of those people against vaccination and drugs as well?
PERHAPS a relatively low amount of naturally occurring creatine is the way that it is for a reason !!!!!
 

Tesseract

Crushed by Thanos
Dec 7, 2008
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my general rule is don't eat shit fighter pilots don't eat

after that YOLO
 
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MrTickles

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Feb 22, 2018
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No thanks, I'd rather just eat healthy and train hard.

So you need creatine. Supplementing it is part of a healthy diet. The reason most people don't walk around with 100% creatine phosphate muscle saturation is because <80% is generally enough for everyday tasks and allows your muscles to operate at 90% efficiency. But for that extra rep or three that makes all the gain difference, being at 100% is amazing. Very few people naturally have close to 100% so creatine supplementation does nothing for them. Going from 70-80 to 100% is completely harmless.
 
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Aug 26, 2018
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I used it before. Creatine pretty much makes space for your body to store more water than before hence you look/get bigger. Like any suplement of that kind, you need to work out heavily otherwise results are minimal. Creatine doesnt get you shredded AT ALL, its the opposite. Lets your body grow but if you just do regular heavy lifting and no cardio, you will look like a fat lumberjack. Theres no way around it, you want a shredded look fast, steroids. The only supplement that not only grows your body but burns fat at an insane rate. Creatine does nothing to burn fat. Also once you are off Creatine, you deflate easily.

The trick is that when you had your 2 month cycle of creatine, lifting heavy and going at it hardcore, you will look chubby/fat but then you do 1 month of intense cardio and TADAAA, theres all this thick muscle hiding underneath the fat that you were growing over couple of months. Question is, do you want to look fat for months and drink 4L of milk and 12 eggs for breakfast to have a fit body 6 months down the line?
 
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GameChanger

Member
Jun 9, 2019
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i'm new to CREATINE and what i've learned is this:

it's affordable

people typically get around 1 gram from a typical normal diet, virtually NONE from a vegan diet..

and through creatine supplements about 5 GRAMS

TO GET 5 GRAMS OF CREATINE YOU'D NEED TO EAT A FUCKING 3 POUND STEAK

it's about the closest thing to steroids you can get, and that shit turns you into a sexual tyrannosaurus

makes you stronger and your muscles denser

THOUGHTS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 🤬🤬🤬
Well no, it's nothing like a steroid and there is things almost identical to steroids called prohormones for example Tr3st which is Trestobol 17β-hydroxy-7α-methylestr-4-en-3-one
but they have the same bad side effects as illegal steroids and you have to take a pct after and a estrogen blocker during usage. There is also very serious side effects and I'm not encouraging anyone to take these or any type steroid unless your doctor recommend it.

If your trying to be a sexual tyrannosaurus eat 1-3 raw garlic cloves and 3-6 vitamin D tablets a few hours before getting with your lady, and stay away from sugar especially soft drinks. (Amounts vary depending on your size and this works amazingly for me might not be just what everyone needs. But if your anything like me might be just what you need.) Might want to eat something afterwards to get rid of the garlic taste/smell.

Doesn't make your muscles stronger or denser it does put water into the muscles and makes them look slightly bigger for a short duration, so it could be beneficial before a show. Honestly I feel kinda sick when I take creatine myself and the effects are very minor and only last a very short time and doesn't always work. I'm not sure the science is even very sound on any improvements in taking this product. If your wanting something that will make you grow taking B12 can help you grow people aren't willing to inject themselves with it for nothing but you really don't need to do that anymore I have done blood tests after taking the under the tongue tablets and they worked just as well as injections do. B12 helps circulate your blood to the muscles and it also helps to make you hungry so it's great for bulking.
 

Off Duty Ninja

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Are you sure you didn't mean CREEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEATINE? You're not the first person I have seen mistake the two.