• Hey, guest user. Hope you're enjoying NeoGAF! Have you considered registering for an account? Come join us and add your take to the daily discourse.
  • The Politics forum has been nuked. Please do not bring political discussion to the rest of the site, or you will be removed. Thanks.

Da'esh (ISIS) |OT| 21st century Evil and menace to Civilization | News and Updates

Status
Not open for further replies.

Joni

Member
Aug 11, 2007
30,092
1
1,165
My House
BBC has hired 19-year old Dutch Thomas van Linge for his accurate ISIS maps. Which I'm mainly saying because the latest versions of his maps show the situation is quite scary in Syria.


 

params7

Banned
Feb 13, 2010
7,270
0
0
32
Central New Jersey

RustyNails

Member
Aug 31, 2009
47,584
0
1,115
Teen ex-slave recounts ISIS horror and reaffirms that they are monsters, and how sex-slave trade is fueling ISIS' economy. Also, drugs.

“They tortured us, tried to forcefully convert us. If we refused we were beaten, chained outdoors in the sun, forced to drink water with dead mice in it. Sometimes they threatened to torture us with electricity,” she said. “These men are not human. They only think of death, killing. They take drugs constantly. They seek vengeance against everyone. They say that one day Daesh will rule over the whole world.” In the book, Jinan describes how once, in Mosul, she was led into “a massive reception hall with large columns ... dozens of women were gathered there.” “The fighters circulated among us, laughing raucously, pinching our backsides,” she writes in “Daesh’s Slave.” She said one man complained, saying: I want a Yazidi with blue eyes and pale skin. Those are the best apparently. I am willing to pay the price.”

During such “slave markets” she saw Iraqis and Syrians but also Westerners whose nationality she could not discern. The best-looking girls were reserved for the bosses or wealthy clients from Gulf nations. Once she was sold, Jinan’s days were punctuated by men’s visits to the house where she was imprisoned with other women. Fighters came to make their purchases in the foyer where traders acted as intermediaries between the slave owners and emirs who inspected the “livestock,” Jinan wrote in the book, which was written with the help of French journalist Thierry Oberle. “I will exchange your Beretta pistol for the brunette,” said one of the traders. “If you prefer to pay cash it is $150 (133 euros). You can also pay in Iraqi dinars.” Convinced that she did not speak Arabic, Janin’s two owners spoke freely in front of her and one night she heard a conversation revealing the extent to which the slave trade is run like a business.

“A man cannot purchase more than three women, unless he is from Syria, Turkey or a Gulf nation,” said one, named Abou Omar. “It’s good for business,” replied the other, Abou Anas. “A Gulf buyer has transport and food costs that a member of Daesh does not. He has a higher quota to make his purchases profitable. “It is a good deal: Daesh increases its profits to support the mujahideen and our foreign brothers are satisfied.”
 

xbhaskarx

Member
Aug 13, 2007
32,779
0
0
oi39.tinypic.com
The Daily Beast:

Exclusive: 50 Spies Say ISIS Intelligence Was Cooked

More than 50 intelligence analysts working out of the U.S. military's Central Command have formally complained that their reports on ISIS and al Qaeda’s branch in Syria were being inappropriately altered by senior officials, The Daily Beast has learned.

The complaints spurred the Pentagon’s inspector general to open an investigation into the alleged manipulation of intelligence. The fact that so many people complained suggests there are deep-rooted, systemic problems in how the U.S. military command charged with the war against the self-proclaimed Islamic State assesses intelligence.
“The cancer was within the senior level of the intelligence command,” one defense official said.

Two senior analysts at CENTCOM signed a written complaint sent to the Defense Department inspector general in July alleging that the reports, some of which were briefed to President Obama, portrayed the terror groups as weaker than the analysts believe they are. The reports were changed by CENTCOM higher-ups to adhere to the administration’s public line that the U.S. is winning the battle against ISIS and al Nusra, al Qaeda’s branch in Syria, the analysts claim.

That complaint was supported by 50 other analysts, some of whom have complained about politicizing of intelligence reports for months. That’s according to 11 individuals who are knowledgeable about the details of the report and who spoke to The Daily Beast on condition of anonymity.

Some of those CENTCOM analysts described the sizeable cadre of protesting analysts as a “revolt” by intelligence professionals who are paid to give their honest assessment, based on facts, and not to be influenced by national-level policy. The analysts have accused senior-level leaders, including the director of intelligence and his deputy in CENTCOM, of changing their analyses to be more in line with the Obama administration’s public contention that the fight against ISIS and al Qaeda is making progress. The analysts take a more pessimistic view about how military efforts to destroy the groups are going.

The large number of analysts who complained to the Pentagon inspector general hasn’t been previously reported. Some of them are assigned to work at CENTCOM, the U.S. military's command for the Middle East and Central Asia, but are officially employed by the Defense Intelligence Agency.

The complaints allege that in some cases key elements of intelligence reports were removed, resulting in a document that didn’t accurately capture the analysts’ conclusions, sources familiar with the protest said. But the complaint also goes beyond alleged altering of reports and accuses some senior leaders at CENTCOM of creating an unprofessional work environment. One person who knows the contents of the written complaint sent to the inspector general said it used the word “Stalinist” to describe the tone set by officials overseeing CENTCOM’s analysis.

Many described a climate in which analysts felt they could not give a candid assessment of the situation in Iraq and Syria. Some felt it was a product of commanders protecting their career advancement by putting the best spin on the war.

Some reports crafted by the analysts that were too negative in their assessment of the war were sent back the chain of the command or not shared up the chain, several analysts said. Still others, feeling the climate around them, self-censored so their reports affirmed already-held beliefs.
 

RustyNails

Member
Aug 31, 2009
47,584
0
1,115
Major operations launched by US backed millitias and Arab/Kurdish coalitions:

New assaults on ISIS in Iraq and in Syria
Iraq-Syria border (CNN)A thick column of black smoke hangs over the Iraqi Syrian border near the town of Ash Shaddadi in Syria 's Hasakah province. Above the area are the circular contrails of coalition planes.

Kurdish military sources on the Iraqi side of the border say ISIS strongholds and oil fields are being targeted south of Hasakah city.

At the same time the new US-backed alliance in Syria, the Syrian Democratic Forces, has announced a new offensive has begun to liberate areas of Hasakah province occupied by ISIS.

Coalition airstrikes and land offensives led by Kurdish forces on both sides of the border are aimed at interrupting ISIS supply lines, retaking territory the group has held for over a year and putting pressure on critical towns such as Deir Ezzor.

Kurdish Peshmerga forces on the Iraqi side of the border - including a brigade of some 5,000 Yazidi fighters - are preparing for what officers describe as an imminent offensive to seize the town of Sinjar. There has been a sharp increase in airstrikes on ISIS-held parts of the town in the last few days.

If ISIS loses Sinjar, it will be more difficult for it to resupply the city of Mosul, the largest it holds.
While...
ISIL captures town in western Syria
(ISIL) fighters drove Syrian government forces from the western town of Maheen on Sunday, a monitoring group reported, as fighting escalated despite a flurry of diplomatic activity and talks between regional rivals.

In a fierce assault that began with the detonation of two suicide car bombs, ISIL militants took from government forces the town of Maheen in the southwest of Homs province, the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights reported.

Some 50 fighters on the government side were killed or wounded, and clashes raged afterward on the outskirts of Sadad, a mostly Christian town nearby, the group said.

ISIL issued a statement claiming the advance, which brought it within 13 miles of the north-south highway linking Damascus to Syria's other main cities — Homs, Hama and Aleppo. Syrian state media made no mention of the attack.

The Observatory's Rami Abdulrahman said the attack might have been in response to pressures that ISIL is under elsewhere.

ISIL is separately fighting both the Syrian army and rebels in western Syria and has launched several attacks on government-held areas since Damascus launched a new offensive against it east of Aleppo, backed by Russian air strikes.

On the other side of Syria in the northeastern province of Hasaka, ISIL is facing a new offensive launched by a recently formed U.S.-backed rebel alliance.
 

Abinash117

Member
Sep 22, 2013
3,371
0
350
SDF guys and Kurds are putting in a lot of pressure and took over 200km of territory. I has been said that AC-130s and A-10s are helping. Between the fighting in Singal and Hasakah Mosul might be cut off from Raqqa.

Here's a briefing about the events

http://www.c-span.org/video/?400304-1/department-defense-briefing-military-operations-isis

And series of tweets about the briefing https://twitter.com/jseldin/with_replies



http://aranews.net/2015/11/syrian-d...station-six-villages-after-clashes-with-isis/

Backed by an air cover from the U.S.-led coalition’s warplanes, the Kurdish-Arab alliance of the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) seized control of al-Hawl gas station near the village of Bahrat al-Khatooniya in the vicinity of al-Hawl town in the eastern countryside of Hasakah, northeast Syria, military sources reported on Tuesday.

This comes subsequent to fierce clashes between the SDF and the extremist group of Islamic State (ISIS) in the area.

The joint Kurdish-Arab forces have also expelled ISIS militants from some six villages in the eastern countryside of Hasakah, including Hilul, Rabiaa, al-Eli, Beit Hussein, Safiyah and Horrem.

At least 13 ISIS militants were killed in Tuesday’s clashes, according to the SDF.

Speaking to ARA News in Hasakah, Kurdish fighter of the People’s Protection Units (YPG) Heval Seradar said the SDF seized control of the Hasakah-Hawl road and other key points in the area after battles with ISIS militants in the countryside of al-Hawl town, “causing heavy losses in the ranks of the terror group”.

The YPG constitutes a leading force in the SDF along with allied Syrian rebel factions.

“Warplanes of the U.S.-led coalition conducted several airstrikes on ISIS’ targets near the villages of Bahrat al-Khatooniya and al-Hamra, coinciding with intense clashes between our forces and the terror group,” the source added.

And some videos

"The Syrian Democratic Forces" Formed By Various Factions


Syrian Democratic Forces (QSD) Liberate Areas from ISIS ( dead bodies)


YPG and SDF against ISIS in south of Hasakah OCT.2015
 

RustyNails

Member
Aug 31, 2009
47,584
0
1,115
Major news: Kurdish Peshmerga begins Operation Free Sinjar to take back the city from ISIS
(CNN)A push to take back the Iraqi town of Sinjar from ISIS by Peshmerga forces has begun, the Kurdistan Region Security Council said Thursday.

"Operation Free Sinjar will include up to 7,500 Peshmerga from three fronts to cordon off Sinjar city, take control of ISIL's strategic supply routes and establish a significant buffer zone to protect the city and its inhabitants from incoming artillery," the council statement said.


Coalition warplanes will provide close air support to Peshmerga forces throughout the operation, it said.


The world watched in horror last year as some 50,000 Yazidis scrambled up Mount Sinjar in northern Iraq to escape the ISIS onslaught. About 5,000 men and boys in Sinjar and nearby villages were massacred, according to U.N. estimates, while teenage girls and women were sold into slavery.

Since then, Sinjar has become a chaotic jumble of demolished buildings whose only inhabitants are a few hundred ISIS fighters facing off against small detachments of Kurdish Peshmerga forces.

But an operation to retake the town has been looming.

Now, some 5,000 Yazidi fighters have been mobilized under the command of the Kurdish Peshmerga to take the battle to ISIS. Most are farmers; a very few have military experience.

In Snuny, Iraq, a village that sits in the shadow of Mount Sinjar, Peshmerga forces have set up camp and Yazidi civilians have started to return home. Speaking to CNN last week, they vowed to take back Sinjar and exact revenge on ISIS.

And this month, the tempo of airstrikes against ISIS positions in and around the town has picked up.

Sinjar matters existentially to the Yazidis, but it's also important in the wider effort to defeat ISIS.

The artery that passes through the town links Mosul -- ISIS' prized possession -- with cities it holds in Syria. Cutting this route is big one step toward dividing the "caliphate" that ISIS claims it is establishing.


Sinjar is to the west of Mosul. You may remember the story from the past when ISIS took over the town, forced the Yazidis up the mountain surrounding the valley and left them to starve to death. Kurds with the help of airstrikes were able to break the siege and free the captives.
 

MisterFalcon

Member
Mar 12, 2013
3,511
648
690
How can you tell? I almost can't even see it is a helicopter.. let alone the type haha.



You can see it's got a fat belly and wide wings with weapons on them. The Apache does not have this.

The convoy also carries no flags of any sort, all trucks are the same type and there are no fighters in the back which is very unusual compared to known footage of ISIS convoys. It's most likely a delivery of a government purchase to an Iraqi militia like Khatib Hezbollah.

The Iraqi Air Force operates 16 Hinds.
 

Suen

Member
Sep 7, 2012
13,038
0
0
Major news: Kurdish Peshmerga begins Operation Free Sinjar to take back the city from ISIS



Sinjar is to the west of Mosul. You may remember the story from the past when ISIS took over the town, forced the Yazidis up the mountain surrounding the valley and left them to starve to death. Kurds with the help of airstrikes were able to break the siege and free the captives.
I love how several the western news outlets have been covering this yet barely covered the liberation of Beiji which is arguably the biggest and most important victory since 2014. Pretty much the same with the Sinjar story where creds went all to the Peshmerga and a few actually covered the extensive role IAA played in saving Yezidi civilians from the area...not a fucking bleep about that. Really speaks volumes of how agenda-driven and laughable the western media is. It's so blatant obvious how pro-kurdish it is (probably from strong lobbying) that the big news outlets actually ignore the crimes done by Barzani & the Peshmerga, and the dictatorship Barzani has installed in the Kurdish regions, all while maintaining a relatively large support for it. Despite oppressing and killing the opposition of his party, civilian supporters of it, and having his force even guilty of ethnic cleansing of Peshmerga-"liberated" villages they are still painted as a good force and the West deals and even finance this ally with weapons, nice. Oh and as a bonus they even fire on IAF targeting ISIS

Only after extensive support from US allies as opposed to the weaker support the army gets (and "none" to PMU lol) are they even bothering. Meanwhile they are shelling against civilians (Turkmen minorities) in Tuz Khurmato at this very moment; victims includes a doctor, a nurse and a 10 year old boy. Lovely

From the perspective of just defeating ISIS I suppose the news above is still good, or at the very least positive since honestly it is at least possible to make a "deal" with Kurds, with ISIS not so much unless you finance them. Still I'd hardly consider them to ever be a good or even decent force, certainly not when the "state" they protect is a dictatorship. We know how that ends up in Middle East. Anyway, more dead ISIS = better.

Other news related to ISIS:


Aluminium powder used by ISIS captured by PMU/ISF in Ramadi. Some Turks are making big bucks, to no one's surprise.
 

Suen

Member
Sep 7, 2012
13,038
0
0
Iraqi news reporting that ISIS killed a professor(?) in the physics department from Mosul Uni. because they wanted him to design a bomb and he refused to do it.
 

Suen

Member
Sep 7, 2012
13,038
0
0
The federal police in Anbar has been targeted lots by ISIS recently, lots of VBIED but they've held back well. Helps that they are from the area as well. Hope they stay strong.

Other good news: ISF and Sunni Tribes smashed ISIS forces to oblivion in Haditha - Alb Hayat.
 

Sijil

Member
Feb 21, 2015
1,351
0
0
Certainly. In addition, when you leave something to "run its course" you're complicit in a potentially evil outcome: consider Western inaction in the Spanish Civil War, which resulted in decades of fascism.

Western action would prove more destructive than inaction. So far Western action has landed high tech equipment and weapons into the hands of Al Queda's affiliates in Syria and empowered extremists.

If the West can agree with Russia and Iran on Syria's future then global intervention can be effective, but as long as both sides having clashing interests and views then the crisis will go on since it's become a proxy war between superpowers.
 

Valhelm

contribute something
Sep 5, 2009
16,224
0
0
Miami
twitter.com
Western action would prove more destructive than inaction. So far Western action has landed high tech equipment and weapons into the hands of Al Queda's affiliates in Syria and empowered extremists.

If the West can agree with Russia and Iran on Syria's future then global intervention can be effective, but as long as both sides having clashing interests and views then the crisis will go on since it's become a proxy war between superpowers.

I agree with your second paragraph, but there's not much worse than inaction. The current situation is much less comparable to Iraq in 2003 than it is to Europe in 1914. Ground-troop action by either the US or Russia could end the war very decisively, but neither government is yet willing to allow thousands of Americans or Russians to die for the Syrian conflict.

Of course, once Assad and/or ISIS are ousted from Syria (depending on who invades), it's going to be very difficult to prevent another insurgent Sunni power from emerging.
 

RustyNails

Member
Aug 31, 2009
47,584
0
1,115
NYT: Strategic Highway 47 captured
MOUNT SINJAR, Iraq — Sweeping down in hodgepodge convoys of trucks and buses, Kurdish forces and Yazidi fighters opened their offensive against Islamic State militants in northern Iraq on Thursday with a burst of initial success: The forces cut off the main highway the jihadists used as a supply line, and they moved in to begin fighting for the town of Sinjar.

The fall of that town to the Islamic State last year was the start of a wave of atrocities — the killing, enslavement and rape of thousands of people from the Yazidi religious minority — that led the Obama administration to step up its use of air power against the jihadists. And it was with heavy American airstrikes that the fight to retake Sinjar began in the early morning hours of Thursday.

More than 7,000 fighters — mostly Kurdish forces, but also Yazidi fighters seeking revenge against the jihadists — raced toward an important supply road, Highway 47, coming from different directions to try to cut off as many as 700 Islamic State militants believed to be waiting in and around Sinjar, flanked by thick fields of improvised bombs.

Trying to achieve some element of surprise, the Kurdish commander of one of the assault’s main forks, Maj. Gen. Aziz Waisi, had directed some of his fighters to head to the south on a rugged and serpentine route over Mount Sinjar, following a dry river bed. After a breakfast of watery soup, under clear morning skies as American airstrikes softened the defenses ahead, his men set out.

The advance was stop and start, at times violently rugged, careening over steep pitches. Other times, the convoy halted completely, a long line of vehicles waiting as earthmoving equipment was brought in to reshape the rocky terrain ahead.

Later, one fighter who was keeping watch for Islamic State suicide attackers along the highway said his nervousness about a potential jihadist counterassault was nothing compared with the nightmare of the twisting drive down Mount Sinjar.

“We were ordered to take the road,” said the pesh merga fighter, Hamid Khudir Ahmed, 24. “Otherwise, I would never have taken it.”
This effectively cut off Mosul from Raqa for ISIS. They will fight for it.
 

Skinpop

Member
Dec 17, 2012
4,476
0
0
In a basement
Is this sarcasm?
no

Due to the slight difference in power between the various factions, the Syrian crisis will take many bloody years to "run its course".
I'm not claiming otherwise. And I'm not even talking about isis and syria/iraq alone but that whole part of the world. I'm thinking 50 years if super optimistic. realistically 100 years, since I don't think change can happen with the mindset of current generations or even their offspring. but sooner or later these nations will be left in the dust if they don't adapt.

sadly it wouldn't surprise me if climate change makes the area inhabitable before we see secular states with proper legal security and progressive human rights legislation over there. If that's the end goal, which for me it would be though maybe some disagree. Anyway I don't think there is room for religion beyond superficial cultural expressions in the future of mankind and it's obvious we are heading there considering pretty much every country that are doing well for themselves is secular. Israel of course will need to be part of this change.

i don't think we can do much to speed this process up so yeah, just let it run it's course. obviously we should offer humanitarian help and import those who are willing to assimilate modern progressive values but in the big picture all of that only serves to alleviate our guilt as bystanders. the culture there has to change from within and that takes time..

could oil becoming obsolete speed up the process? if so progress might be a bit faster.
 

Klossen

Banned
Dec 12, 2014
1,442
0
0
When do you propose the meddling to stop? Effective immediately? Congratulations, you just indirectly killed thousands of Kurds and Christians and other minorities.

I would also add to your second paragraph that worldwide, the number of religious people is increasing. Islam will make the bulk of the growth. I don't see how we're heading towards a secular future.

Source
 

Skinpop

Member
Dec 17, 2012
4,476
0
0
In a basement
When do you propose the meddling to stop? Effective immediately? Congratulations, you just indirectly killed thousands of Kurds and Christians and other minorities.
I don't have answers for these questions but I do have a complete lack of confidence in the west's ability to stabilize the region. even if IS is eliminated you still have rebel groups, tribal groups, different ethnic groups, religious issues, corrupt leaders and so on perpetuating conflict.
Sure people will die but it wouldn't surprise me if more people on a whole is killed because of our involvement.

I would also add to your second paragraph that worldwide, the number of religious people is increasing. Islam will make the bulk of the growth. I don't see how we're heading towards a secular future.

Source
secular future is inevitable, though again I have no clue how long it will take. islam is growing because 3rd world countries are growing. within a few decades most of these countries will be fairly modernized with fertility rates comparable to the west. education and shrinking poverty by itself will eradicate most of religion. africa is a big question mark especially since the last 1-2 billion of population growth will happen there.
 

Klossen

Banned
Dec 12, 2014
1,442
0
0
I don't have answers for these questions but I do have a complete lack of confidence in the west's ability to stabilize the region. even if IS is eliminated you still have rebel groups, tribal groups, different ethnic groups, religious issues, corrupt leaders and so on perpetuating conflict.
Sure people will die but it wouldn't surprise me if more people on a whole is killed because of our involvement.
Just standing by and letting people die (who partly share our human values) in the hopes that the region in the long term by some magical force will "fix itself" is not only naive, but also highly immoral. Our goal should be to fight evil where it appears, not close our eyes and hope the problem solves itself on the backs of thousands of deads.
 

RustyNails

Member
Aug 31, 2009
47,584
0
1,115
Aljazeera reporting Peshmerga captured Sinjar and ISIS ran away

Peshmerga forces wrest Sinjar from ISIL, raise Kurdish flag in town
Peshmerga forces raised a Kurdish flag in the center of Sinjar on Friday, having seemingly pushed out ISIL fighters from the strategically important northern Iraqi town.

It follows a major offensive to retake the town, assisted by U.S. airstrikes and American ground troops in an advisory role, the Pentagon said. Sinjar was seized by the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) last year in a push that resulted in tens of thousands of Yazidis fleeing.

Speaking Friday, Massud Barzani, the president of the Iraqi Kurdish region, announced the town's "liberation."

"Without doubt, any victory in any area will have a big impact on achieving victory in the remaining areas. And without doubt the liberation of Sinjar will have a big impact on liberating Mosul too," he added, referring to the key city that U.S. and Iraqi officials are targeting in the pushback against ISIL.

Earlier, peshmerga Maj. Ghazi Ali, who oversees one of the units involved in the mission, dubbed Operation Free Sinjar, said thousands of Kurdish fighters entered the town from three directions Friday morning.

They encountered minimal resistance during Friday's push, he said. He described the situation in the city as still dangerous, however, and warned that it was too soon to declare victory.

Iraq's highest Shia religious authority, Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, praised peshmerga fighters in his Friday sermon for their efforts to capture Sinjar from ISIL.

Col. Steven Warren, a spokesman for the U.S.-led coalition, confirmed only that peshmerga fighters raised their flag on grain silos in the eastern part of the town. He said they had not fully retaken Sinjar.

There is reason for caution. An earlier attempt to wrest back control of the town from ISIL — at the foot of Mount Sinjar, about 30 miles from the border with Syria — stalled in December. Since then, ISIL has been reinforcing its ranks.

But this week’s offensive that could provide critical momentum in efforts to defeat ISIL, and the new mission in Sinjar has cut off the ISIL's supply lines between its strongholds of Mosul in Iraq and Raqqa in Syria.
They captured the town in just a day. Wow, that's a massive confidence boost.
 

CHEEZMO™

Obsidian fan
Jan 22, 2008
21,461
0
920
ISIS likely learnt their lesson and decided to withdraw to fight another day than try to go all Stalingrad on yet another town.
 

Crisco

Banned
Oct 26, 2007
7,783
1
0
They just melt away in the face of any well trained, well equipped, and motivated ground force.
 

Skinpop

Member
Dec 17, 2012
4,476
0
0
In a basement
Just standing by and letting people die (who partly share our human values) in the hopes that the region in the long term by some magical force will "fix itself" is not only naive, but also highly immoral. Our goal should be to fight evil where it appears, not close our eyes and hope the problem solves itself on the backs of thousands of deads.

evil is not a thing. when you start to talk about evil you might as well be quoting from the bible. there are reasons these things are happening: psychological, political, cultural and so on but evil is not on that list of things.

it's better to stand by if interfering makes the situation worse. which arguably is exactly what has happened over the last few decades.
 

Suen

Member
Sep 7, 2012
13,038
0
0
Aljazeera reporting Peshmerga captured Sinjar and ISIS ran away

Peshmerga forces wrest Sinjar from ISIL, raise Kurdish flag in town

They captured the town in just a day. Wow, that's a massive confidence boost.
Good news.

Mesud Barzani said there's no PKK participating in the opeartion of Sinjar, and Rudaw, the mouthpiece for Peshmerga and KDP said it was only done by Peshmerga forces.

The funny part is that after Barzani said that Rudaw had a live interview with a HPG commander in Sinjar lol. So Barzani lied, Rudaw had an interview that proved his lie and then Rudaw lied about the operation only being done by Peshmerga forces like Barzani did. facepalm.png

That's an offensive way of treating the thousands of HPS, YBS, PKK and YPG fighters that took part in the liberation of Sinjar. Apparently they are quite pissed, but this is nothing new from the Barzani and his Peshmerga gang ruling the Kurdish north, they treated the Iraqi army similarly. They live on taking all the cred from others to gain more international support.

Mosul-Raqqa link may be breaking down soon, partially due to the help of YPG's offensive along the Iraqi-Syrian border. They're doing some good stuff. SAA lifted the siege on kweires airbase, so they may even cut the whole supply line to Raqqa.

Other news:

Albu Hayat liberated, army seized heavy mortars that were used to shell civilians in close proximity to Haditha.

Iraqi Army captured a headquarter in Albu Diab northwest of Ramadi.

Ramadi is getting intense, ISF is about to take the battle to the city center of Ramadi. Slowly getting liberated.

ISIS getting fucked bit by bit in Iraq.



You can see it's got a fat belly and wide wings with weapons on them. The Apache does not have this.

The convoy also carries no flags of any sort, all trucks are the same type and there are no fighters in the back which is very unusual compared to known footage of ISIS convoys. It's most likely a delivery of a government purchase to an Iraqi militia like Khatib Hezbollah.

The Iraqi Air Force operates 16 Hinds.
Yeah it's Mi24D type. US doesn't operate them, and no Iraq doesn't operate them. Vehicles have no ISIS markings on them. I'd take a guess and say that this footage isn't even from Iraq.

They just melt away in the face of any well trained, well equipped, and motivated ground force.
To be fair they had extensive support from the US so I'd hardly consider this to be a good example of showing a well trained and motivated ground force. I'd agree if we were talking about PKK and YPG though because they've shown it before, the Peshmerga gang not so much.
 

Suen

Member
Sep 7, 2012
13,038
0
0

The video posted clearly shows a Hind with retractable undercarraige, and Iraq operated Mi24 with that up until American came and destroyed/vandalized it in 2003. Iraq now operate Mi35m which they purchased in 2014 with non-retractable undercarriage.

You can stop now.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.