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Da'esh (ISIS) |OT| 21st century Evil and menace to Civilization | News and Updates

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Suen

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I have no idea what that mean.

Care to explain?
I think it's pretty clear. These are remnants captured by Kurdish forces and the remnants include plates licensed by Saudi Arabia that have been exported, it's even written on them. Most likely entered through Syria or Jordan and ended up in Iraq.

Does that answer your question? Otherwise please elaborate.
 

Ovid

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I think it's pretty clear. These are remnants captured by Kurdish forces and the remnants include plates licensed by Saudi Arabia that have been exported, it's even written on them. Most likely entered through Syria or Jordan and ended up in Iraq.

Does that answer your question? Otherwise please elaborate.
What's the purpose of having Saudi plates exported?
 

M.Bluth

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IS remnants in Sinjar showing Saudi licensed plates:


Uh oh....


A quick google search will show that that style of plates was discontinued in 2007.
Everyone knows there are ISIS supporters and financiers from Arab Gulf states. We know they were provided with guns and vehicles and all sorts of shit over the years.

Which is why that picture is pointless. ISIS got cars with Saudi plates? So what? They might've stolen them from someone who imported cars from Saudi Arabia after the 2003 invasion. They might be just stacks of plates removed after being imported via Saudi Arabia from any other state, as well. They might've got them directly from their supporters in Saudi Arabia. Furthest thing from an "Uh oh..." moment.
 

Suen

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A quick google search will show that that style of plates was discontinued in 2007.
Everyone knows there are ISIS supporters and financiers from Arab Gulf states. We know they were provided with guns and vehicles and all sorts of shit over the years.

Which is why that picture is pointless. ISIS got cars with Saudi plates? So what? They might've stolen them from someone who imported cars from Saudi Arabia after the 2003 invasion. They might be just stacks of plates removed after being imported via Saudi Arabia from any other state, as well. They might've got them directly from their supporters in Saudi Arabia. Furthest thing from an "Uh oh..." moment.
Which was the whole point of that post. "So what?" You don't see a fucking problem with this? I'm already aware of that picture, that they were discontinued in 2007 is irrelavant since Al-Qaida/ISIS already had a presence in Iraq at that time, in fact even before it.

Some could have been stolen from importers in 2003, but considering how frequently the army in Iraq, and in more recent times the PMU, have found cars with Saudi plates on after killing ISIS in operations it's safe to assume that someone, likely from KSA, is supporting them with vehicles, and that is a huge problem.

That is more directed to people that deny there's any Saudi involvement with terrorist groups.
 

Suen

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ISF finally began ops to retake the city center of Ramadi

IFP are taking part in combat in Salahuddin province.

edit: ISIS cells arrested in Salahuddin by IFP raids.

edit 2: Palace of Justice liberated in Ramadi.

Egypt's forces have killed 24 ISIS fighters, and eight of them have been captured in a cave in Sinai, not too far off from the crash site of the Russian airline, think I will post this in the airline thread as well.

Iraq's flag raised in Sinjar



This is despite the fact that Barzani said no flag other than the Kurdish flag will ever be raised in Sinjar lol.

Just so people won't think this is some silly game of "You belong to Iraq therefore you should be raising Iraq's flag, not the Kurdish flag" (which is technically correct anyway, at least until they get their independence which is hopefully as soon as they get rid of their dictatorship) the reason Iraq's flag is raised there is because IAA took part in the operations and acted as medevac and worked with IED clearance, something the pro-Kurdish western media completely ignored. This is on top of the Kurds and the pro-kurdish western media almost completely ignoring how many Yezidi lives IAA has actually been saving from Sinjar ever since it fell to ISIS, or ignoring how the Peshmerga abandoned Yezidi civilians there in the face of an advancing ISIS unit or..well fuck I could continue forever.

So not only did they ignore and lie about the participation and sacrifices made by HPS, YBS, PKK and YPG but they also did the same for IAA. Truly a wonderful ally for the big players abroad.
 

thefro

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The Paris shootings and other terrorist attacks have really obscured the fact that it's been an awful couple months for Daesh.

Things in Iraq seem to be going fairly well and if the international community can get ceasefire talks going in Syria (Russia and Iran are on board) you could see a pretty rapid change there as well.
 

Suen

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The Paris shootings and other terrorist attacks have really obscured the fact that it's been an awful couple months for Daesh.

Things in Iraq seem to be going fairly well and if the international community can get ceasefire talks going in Syria (Russia and Iran are on board) you could see a pretty rapid change there as well.
To be honest it was fairly quiet for months before the Paris shootings happened. Regarding Iraq, the major news outlets in the West usually report only when Kurds are preparing an operation and when they succeed since it's largely pro-Kurdish. The significant progress in Anbar, in the proximity of Fallujah and Ramadi has been mostly ignored. Heck, the liberation of Beiji which is one of the most important strategic wins wasn't even covered or mentioned by them and only picked up by some smaller news outlets. In fact even the ongoing massive progress in Ramadi is being ignored, and that's going on right now.

The only non-Kurdish operation that did get some attention was the liberation of Tikrit, and even that went largely unnoticed after it was liberated. There was no report of how IA and PMU was clearing the city of IEDs and booby traps and how they brought back the locals who slowly started resuming their normal life again. Reason? It goes against the media's narrative of IA being incompetent (because of the fall of Mosul, which mind you, fell mostly because security forces, consisting of Arab Sunnis and Kurds, fled straight to Erbil and abandoned it) and the PMU of being sectarian.

Make no mistake, ISIS has lost a lot in Iraq this year (and are still losing as we speak), both from IA/PMU and Peshmerga/PKK, but due to a clear agenda-driven and pro-kurdish western media you are only likely to hear about Kurdish operations and success, thus making the average joe believe little progress has been made.

Even something as small as a joint US-Kurd raid that rescued "civilians" (Baathists actually, but first reported by Kurds to be Kurdish fighters) received more coverage than the liberation of Beiji. Pretty much tells you everything.
 

Suen

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IA finding dolls that are filled with explosives. Those were planned to be handed out to Shia families who are making a pilgrimage to one of their sacred sites.



 

Ushay

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Above pics .. what the hell is wrong with IS, explosives in dolls. These guys have killed exponentially more Muslims (I think the figure was 100k) than non-Muslims in the last 2 years. Their ideology is a blight on Islam.
 

Henkka

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Aug 14, 2014
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IA finding dolls that are filled with explosives. Those were planned to be handed out to Shia families who are making a pilgrimage to one of their sacred sites.

Wow. There are no words. They're literally cartoon villains.
 

Suen

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ISIS executes 3,500 in Syria since declaring 'caliphate:' activists

I can't take something like the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights seriously, let alone treat it as a credible source. The article is a good read anyway, and it doesn't differ from the patterns ISIS has shown in other parts of the region so much of it is likely to be true regardless of the source of the information. Also keep in mind that the numbers are likely to be far higher than that; who knows how much that is unreported or how many undiscovered mass graves there are.

Note that the article mentions many of the victims being from a Sunni tribe that opposed ISIS. Similarly ISIS in Iraq specifically targeted certain Sunni tribes who made up large number of the victims in Sunni areas beacuse these tribes opposed them, fought against them and stood up for their country by supporting IA and PMU (some even joining the latter)
 

RustyNails

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UAE ready to commit ground troops against Daesh in Syria

Abu Dhabi (AFP) - The United Arab Emirates has said it is ready to commit ground troops against jihadists in Syria and described Russian air strikes in the country as attacks on a "common enemy".

Quoted by the official WAM news agency on Monday, Emirati State Minister for Foreign Affairs Anwar Gargash said the UAE would "participate in any international effort demanding a ground intervention to fight terrorism".

"Regional countries must bear part of the burden" of such an intervention, he said during a Sunday discussion on Syria.

The UAE is a member of the US-led coalition carrying out air strikes against the jihadist Islamic State group in territory under the jihadists' control in Syria and Iraq.

As the jihadists have held out against more than a year of strikes and launched operations abroad including the November 13 attacks in Paris, there have been growing calls for the anti-IS intervention to expand to a ground force.

Russia launched its own strikes in Syria in late September and Iran has reportedly sent hundreds of troops to support President Bashar al-Assad's regime.

Critics -- including in the West and Sunni Arab Gulf nations -- have accused Russia of targeting moderate rebel forces as well as jihadists.

In the UAE's first official reaction to the Russian strikes, Gargash said "we agree that nobody will be upset by the Russian bombardment of Daesh or Al-Qaeda as it targets a common enemy."

Daesh is an Arabic acronym for IS.

Gargash also suggested the Saudi-led intervention in Yemen -- which has seen Arab countries including the UAE send ground troops against Iran-backed rebels -- could be "an alternative model" to Western intervention in the region.

"The global strategy to fight terrorism is no longer fruitful or enough," he said.

On Sunday, US senators John McCain and Lindsey Graham called for 100,000 foreign soldiers, most from Sunni regional states but also including Americans, to fight IS in Syria.

http://news.yahoo.com/uae-says-ready-commit-troops-fight-syria-jihadists-145913099.html

Also, that doll shit is absolutely scum kind of evil. I bet even Nazis werent that insane.
 

RustyNails

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Iraqi Forces recapture 60% of Ramadi
(CNN)More than half of Ramadi -- the Iraqi city whose sudden fall to ISIS raised questions about Baghdad's ability to combat the terror group -- is now back in Iraqi control after a big push this week, the country's military said.

The inroads came after Iraqi troops, counterterrorism unit members and federal police officers targeted ISIS militants from three sides in a 24-hour period, aided by U.S.-led airstrikes.

Iraq's Joint Military Command reported 60% of the Anbar province city had been retaken, including a one-time Iraqi military headquarters in northern Ramadi, as well as western and southern parts of the city.

Dozens of ISIS fighters died in the operation, according to the military. It wasn't immediately clear if there were any Iraqi casualties. Iraqi troops also managed to confiscate a large amount of weaponry.

U.S. Central Command said it had launched six strikes Monday around Ramadi, hitting two ISIS tactical units and destroying weaponry, ammunition and supply caches, buildings and a vehicle.

Symbolic importance

Besides its strategic significance, Ramadi -- some 120 kilometers (75 miles) west of Baghdad in the Sunni heartland -- has symbolic importance in Iraq's fight against ISIS.

Iraqi forces withdrew en masse from the city in May, a pullout regarded as a huge setback to the anti-ISIS campaign, and spurred U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter to question whether the Iraqis lacked the "will to fight."

Iraqi officials, including Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi, later said Carter had bad information. And Salim al-Jabouri, speaker of the Iraqi parliament and arguably the country's most powerful Sunni politician, said that even the Prime Minister didn't know of the withdrawal until after it happened.

The city was one of "three R's" identified as the core of a triple-pronged U.S. strategy against ISIS that Carter floated before U.S. lawmakers in October. The others were raids by special forces, and Raqqa, the extremists' de-facto capital in Syria.

ISIS tries to keep residents from fleeing

This embarrassment has made retaking Ramadi a focus for Iraqi forces, who have been battling ISIS on several fronts. The terror group has taken over vast swaths of Iraq and neighboring Syria while creating what it calls the Islamic State in addition to inspiring and carrying out attacks elsewhere.

Starting last month, Iraqi forces began dropping leaflets on Ramadi urging people to leave ahead of a promised military offensive.


"To our people in the city of Ramadi, evacuate your families from the city immediately and go to the south through al Hameera area," the leaflets read, according to the Iraqi military.

But leaving isn't necessarily easy. Ramadi residents told CNN on Monday night that ISIS had set up additional checkpoints around the city to prevent people from fleeing.

"Daesh made it very clear to all of us that anyone who tries to flee the city will be considered an apostate. And you know what they will do to an apostate," said one resident, referring to ISIS' practice of detaining and killing those who don't accept its extreme ideology.

Another told CNN that most people were unable to leave due to the threat of being caught fleeing by ISIS.

"(I'm) not going to take the risk," he said. "The government is not proving us any guarantees that we will be safe during our trip south."

U.S. wants Iraqis to 'move as rapidly as possible'

The Iraqis began pushing last spring, right after Ramadi fell. That didn't yield immediate results.

In October, Col. Steve Warren, a spokesman for the U.S.-led anti-ISIS coalition, told reporters that "we now believe the battlefield conditions are set" for Iraqi forces to take back Ramadi.

At that point, Iraqi forces had established positions in the city's suburbs, he said.

"We'd like to see them move as rapidly as possible," Warren said then. "We believe now is the time for the final push into Ramadi."
 

RustyNails

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Wow, absolutely extraordinary report by Ben Wedeman on his travel to the frontlines of the fight against Daesh

This is a story about Syria at war, but it's not a war story. Please read all of it. Some choice quotes.
Fahd particularly enjoyed listening to my recollections of meeting Saddam Hussein, and interviewing his psychotic, murderous son Udai, who made my blood run cold with his blank, cold stare which said, "I could kill you as easily as I could kill a fly."
n our first full day we went to the northwestern city of Al-Hassakeh and met with Lewand Rojava, a commander of the Kurdish Peoples' Protection Units (YPG). He is 35 years old and before the war traded in building materials.

Today Rojava commands what is, for all intents and purposes, the most effective force fighting ISIS. He was quick to acknowledge the help of the warplanes of the U.S.-led anti-ISIS coalition, which have been hitting ISIS targets in this part of Syria since last year.
About an hour's drive to the south of Al-Hassakeh is the town of Al-Houl, recently retaken from ISIS by Kurdish forces. We walked through what was the ISIS "police station" -- a stark affair with a lone overstuffed chair outside. No one had taken the time to paint over the ISIS slogans.

Next to it was the ISIS courthouse, formerly a school. In it we were reminded that ISIS is not just a group of fanatics, it's also a bureaucracy. One announcement we found on the floor called on those living under ISIS rule to hand over whatever they had looted from the city of Mosul, in Iraq, and elsewhere, back to ISIS. Another detailed how much wheat and barley farmers were required to give to ISIS in taxes.
I've lived in the Middle East for almost four decades and always thought this part of the globe was a "man's world." This encounter disabused me of this sexist, antiquated illusion.

The women, mostly in their early twenties, were commanded by 21-year-old Telhelden (Kurdish for "revenge"), who was dismissive of the ISIS fighters she and her comrades had driven out of Al-Houl.

"They think they're fighting in the name of Islam," she said. "They believe if someone from Daesh [ISIS] is killed by a girl, a Kurdish girl, they won't go to heaven. They're afraid of girls."

Efelin, 20, giggled when I asked her if ISIS ever tried to approach their position. "If they do," she replied, "we won't leave one of them alive."
Rather than try to stop them in the open plains and tiny hamlets of northeast Syria, Kurdish commanders told us their strategy was to draw ISIS into Kobani, where they would be able take advantage of their familiarity with the terrain to stop and slaughter ISIS.

Their strategy worked, thanks in large part to the intense airstrikes by the U.S.-led coalition. In the process, the coalition ended up having to destroy much of Kobani to save it, to borrow a well-used phrase from the U.S. debacle in Vietnam.

More than 70% of the buildings in Kobani were either damaged or destroyed, and from the destruction it appears much of it was inflicted by the airstrikes.
Al-Qamishli is one of the few places in Syria where different groups -- Kurds, Arabs, Christians, Turkmen -- seem to live together in relative harmony. And in this era of whipped up hysteria about Syrian refugees, Al-Qamishli has an interesting past. One hundred years ago Armenian Christians found refuge here, fleeing genocide in Turkey. Assyrian Christians also found refuge there after similar persecution in Turkey and Iraq. Kurds came here fleeing crackdowns in Turkey and Iraq.

At the Friday market, however, the main concern was the skyrocketing cost of living. Turkey has closed the borders, while the transport costs of food coming from Aleppo and elsewhere to the west has skyrocketed, since ISIS is taxing it.

Despite their understandable laments, Al-Qamishli reminded me of the Syria I once lived in. People were relaxed and friendly, including two young men who watched as we were filming one of the city's main streets.
Click the link for video.
The Russian submarine Rostov-on-Don enters the Mediterranean and launches Kalibr cruise missiles at ISIS targets in Raqqa, in Syria.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8B64gmKWn8
http://www.defensenews.com/story/br...r-caliber-cruise-missile-syria-kilo/76995346/

Good on Putin. I hope those cruise missiles destroyed everything they targeted and blew those fuckers straight to hell.

Great video. But is it just me or the arc of those missiles being launched seemed awfully low? Sorry I have no clue how missiles work.
 

Abinash117

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Wow, absolutely extraordinary report by Ben Wedeman on his travel to the frontlines of the fight against Daesh

This is a story about Syria at war, but it's not a war story. Please read all of it. Some choice quotes.






Click the link for video.


Great video. But is it just me or the arc of those missiles being launched seemed awfully low? Sorry I have no clue how missiles work.

Kobani was a like a turning point against ISIS. So many of their fighters got killed and I heard really will experienced ones-the Kurds could have nearly got completely defeated in Syria. Kobani lead to many things afterwards.
 

kitch9

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Jan 23, 2007
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Wow, absolutely extraordinary report by Ben Wedeman on his travel to the frontlines of the fight against Daesh

This is a story about Syria at war, but it's not a war story. Please read all of it. Some choice quotes.






Click the link for video.


Great video. But is it just me or the arc of those missiles being launched seemed awfully low? Sorry I have no clue how missiles work.

Those missiles could be fired the wrong way and they would still hit their target with an accuracy of a metre or so.
 

Gorger

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Iraqi forces have pushes their ways into the center of Ramadi. A couple of hundred daesh fighters are still holding ground using civilians as human shields, but apparently some of them have managed to escape.

"We think there are no more than 300 foreign fighters from Daesh still fighting, probably the suicide bombers. But overall, we think we are very close to liberating the city," Muhannad Haimour said, using a pejorative term for IS based on the acronym of its previous name in Arabic.

"It's a very, very difficult battle, especially with so many booby-traps, explosives and sniper fire against the security forces and tribal fighters."

Mr Haimour said the jihadists had taken many men prisoner and prevented their families from leaving.

The operation to recapture Ramadi, which began in early November, has made slow progress, mainly because the government has chosen not to use the powerful Shia-dominated paramilitary force that helped it regain the northern city of Tikrit to avoid increasing sectarian tensions.

IS has lost control of several key towns in Iraq to government and Kurdish forces since over-running large swathes of the country's west and north in June 2014 and proclaiming the creation of a "caliphate" that also extended into neighbouring Syria

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-35165747
 

params7

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ISIS militant executes own mother in Raqqa. She asked him to leave the group.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-35260475

An Islamic State militant carried out a public "execution" of his mother because she asked him to leave the group, activists say.

Ali Saqr, 21, killed his mother, Lena al-Qasem, 45, outside the post office in Raqqa, Syria, eyewitnesses said.

Raqqa has served as IS' de facto capital since the group captured the city in August 2013.

IS does not tolerate any dissent and imposes brutal punishments, often carried out in public.

The UK-based monitoring group, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights (SOHR) and the activist group Raqqa is Being Slaughtered Silently (RIBSS) reported the incident. RIBSS however said that the woman was killed for the crime of apostasy.
 

CHEEZMO™

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Jan 22, 2008
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New issue of Dabiq is out.

As you may guess from the title - The Rafidah: From Ibn Saba to the Dajjal - this issue is focused on anti-Shia stuff. But that isn't it all.

This edition opens with a foreword praising the attack in San Bernadino, has a pretty hefty section railing against Saudi clerics, a section eulogising "Jihadi John" confirming he was killed in a drone strike in Raqqa, an interview with the leader of their AFPAK/Central Asian branch (Wilayat Khurasan) that provides some insight on their views on the Taliban, and ends with a photo mural glorifying the Paris attackers.

Quite an interesting read, particularly the bit about the Taliban. I knew they were in conflict but I didn't know what their actual thoughts on them were.
 

CHEEZMO™

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Jan 22, 2008
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New ISIS video all about the Paris attacks. Features the attackers in Iraq and Syria delivering statements and executing people, and saying that they will be in Paris soon.

Ends with a pretty unsettling implied threat to the UK.
 

CHEEZMO™

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Jan 22, 2008
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Libya and I feel Afghanistan will be the places to watch for ISIS news in 2016.
 

RustyNails

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This is intensely worrying:

The Mosul dam: A watery time-bomb
“FIRE or flood” goes an old saying about the turbulent history of Iraq; and just now flood is the one to fear. American officials are ringing alarm bells over a potentially catastrophic collapse of the country’s biggest dam, 50km (30 miles) upstream from Mosul, Iraq’s second city, currently held by Islamic State (IS)
One study says that if the dam collapses, Mosul would be submerged within hours. Another warns that half a million Iraqis could be killed by floodwaters, and more than a million forced from their homes. Disease and looting as the floodwaters raced through Baiji, Tikrit, Samarra and even parts of Baghdad would complete that dreadful scenario.
America’s Army Corps of Engineers warned in 2005 that the “extraordinary engineering measures” needed to maintain its structural integrity made the structure potentially the most dangerous in the world. But taking the dam out of commission is not an attractive option. Emptying the reservoir would leave Iraqis seriously short of drinking and unpolluted irrigation water in the summer.
Is this alarmist news? I keep hearing about the dam more and more as the soldiers are mobilizing around Mosul.
 

Phantast2k

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Exclusive: Radioactive material stolen in Iraq raises security fears

Iraq is searching for "highly dangerous" radioactive material stolen last year, according to an environment ministry document and seven security, environmental and provincial officials who fear it could be used as a weapon if acquired by Islamic State.

The material, stored in a protective case the size of a laptop computer, went missing in November from a storage facility near the southern city of Basra belonging to U.S. oilfield services company Weatherford (WFT.N), the document obtained by Reuters showed and officials confirmed.

A spokesman for Iraq's environment ministry said he could not discuss the issue, citing national security concerns. A Weatherford spokesman in Iraq declined to comment, and the company's Houston headquarters did not respond to repeated requests for comment.

The material, which uses gamma rays to test flaws in materials used for oil and gas pipelines in a process called industrial gamma radiography, is owned by Istanbul-based SGS Turkey, according to the document and officials.

An SGS official in Iraq declined to comment and referred Reuters to its Turkish headquarters, which did not respond to phone calls.

The document, dated Nov. 30 and addressed to the ministry's Centre for Prevention of Radiation, describes "the theft of a highly dangerous radioactive source of Ir-192 with highly radioactive activity belonging to SGS from a depot belonging to Weatherford in the Rafidhia area of Basra province".

A senior environment ministry official based in Basra, who declined to be named as he is not authorized to speak publicly, told Reuters the device contained up to 10 grams (0.35 ounces) of Ir-192 "capsules", a radioactive isotope of iridium also used to treat cancer.

(...)

That's just great.
 

Suen

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^

Already found by security forces some days ago thanks to residents reporting suspicious looking stuff.

Two suicide bombers kill 15 at Shi'ite mosque in Baghdad

Two suicide bombers blew themselves up at a Shi'ite mosque in Baghdad on Thursday, killing at least 15 people in an attack claimed by Islamic State militants.

Fifty other people were wounded in the blast in the predominantly Shi'ite Shulaa neighborhood of the Iraqi capital, police and medical sources said.

The first bomber detonated his vest inside the mosque and the second blew himself up when security forces gathered at the site of the initial blast.

Four of the victims were members of the security forces, the sources said.

Islamic State, which controls swathes of Iraq's north and west, said the attacks targeted "apostates" - a term the ultra-hardline Sunni group uses to describe Shi'ite Muslims.

Here's a video starting moments before the suicide bombers blew themselves up that lasts till they blow themselves up. No graphic stuff or gore is visible. A terrifying scene the Shia of Iraq have had to live with frequently since 2003. The guy sitting and praying or whatever to the second suicide bomber...the fact that he was looking at his killer moments before he died just like that is just hard to watch.

Video of the suicide bombing
 

Suen

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70+ Shia muslims blown up by Sunni extremists in Baghdad today.

ISIS took responsibility saying they had killed "hundreds of rejectionists".

So just to remind people: that's over 100 Shia muslims killed in Baghdad in less than two days. Saddest part? This is like a daily thing for them ever since 2003.
 

Suen

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Pictures above show Alawite children kept captive by Jabhat Ansar al-Din. They are basically given religious education (on how to become a terrorist). Basically these guys killed their parents, or killed their fathers and took their mothers as sex slaves, similarly to what ISIS did to Yezidis.

Think JAD is just some another radical Sunni outcast in Syria? Think again, not only does JAD have connections to JAN (at the very least ideologically), but they are part of JAF. JAF is actively supported by Turkey and Saudi Arabia. Another fine example of the West's and their Middle Eastern allies (one of them a NATO member) "moderate rebels"
 

Walpurgis

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Wow. I don't even know what to say to that.
In response: Shia worshippers praying at the site where yesterday's twin suicide bombing took place.
Incredible.
70+ Shia muslims blown up by Sunni extremists in Baghdad today.

ISIS took responsibility saying they had killed "hundreds of rejectionists".

So just to remind people: that's over 100 Shia muslims killed in Baghdad in less than two days. Saddest part? This is like a daily thing for them ever since 2003.
This is absolutely insane. I wonder what the body count is. I wouldn't be surprised to hear that it is comparable to a war at this point.. The international community is truly pathetic.
 

Mimosa97

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Yeah there are no moderate rebels. There's only a tyran vs a bunch of radical lunatics who are only slightly better than ISIS.

You get to choose between Aids and Ebola.
 

RustyNails

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Yeah there are no moderate rebels. There's only a tyran vs a bunch of radical lunatics who are only slightly better than ISIS.

You get to choose between Aids and Ebola.

I'd go with Ebola as that at least has a chance of you surviving and living out a normal life.

However, these ISIS and it's allied parties are genocidal scum. I can't wait until every last one of these monsters are either dead, captured or hung from a tree. They are getting more and more desperate, like the Nazis when Berlin was surrounded. They're going to be pulling more and more public spectacles like the one above because they are losing ground, troops, and finances. Last I heard, the salary of Jihadists was cut in half couple of months ago.
 

Dayner_Kurdi

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Aug 9, 2015
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no matter how many bomb you drop on ISIS they won't stop, even if you did beat them, someone else with more ruthless ideology will raise from the ashes, everyone saying bomb the shit out of them, but no clear plan on what to do next.

as an arab and muslim i do understand why young people flack to join up with them with promises, not knowing they are all lies and then brainwash to the point that everyone around them is enemy, its really the dark age to be an arab and muslim.
 

SomTervo

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no matter how many bomb you drop on ISIS they won't stop, even if you did beat them, someone else with more ruthless ideology will raise from the ashes, everyone saying bomb the shit out of them, but no clear plan on what to do next.

as an arab and muslim i do understand why young people flack to join up with them with promises, not knowing they are all lies and then brainwash to the point that everyone around them is enemy, its really the dark age to be an arab and muslim.

You're very right, and it's really sad to hear the bolded coming from a Muslim person. The whole thing is such a heinous tragedy. I'm an agnostic atheist but I have a lot of respect for many religions and faiths. It's horrific that a powerful minority can tarnish the name of an entire swathe of humanity.

I'd go with Ebola as that at least has a chance of you surviving and living out a normal life.

Quite a lot of people live relatively normal lives with AIDS, and can live for quite a long time, FYI. Particularly if it's caught early. I think Ebola has a much higher chance of killing you within days/weeks.
 

Suen

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Sep 7, 2012
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and the Shia genocide continues:

IS kills scores in truck-bombing of Iraqi checkpoint

At least 47 people have been killed in a truck bomb attack at a crowded checkpoint outside the city of Hilla, south of Baghdad, police and medical sources said.

Pictures posted on social media showed vast destruction around the checkpoint on Sunday, where cars are usually queued to be checked by security personnel.

A doctor at Hilla hospital put the number of people killed by the blast at 47, including around 20 members of the security forces, and said at least 72 people were also wounded.

Radhi and police officers confirmed the casualty toll, the heaviest from any car bomb attack in Iraq this year.

The Reuters news agency reported that the Islamic State group had claimed the attack in a post on the website of the Amaq news agency, which supports IS.


A doctor at Hilla hospital said at least 11 of the wounded were in a very serious condition.

Hilla is the capital of the province of Babylon, a predominantly Shia region with some Sunni presence.

IS, which carries out nearly all such attacks, has not had fixed positions south of Baghdad since security forces and allied militias began their fightback against the group in late 2014.

However, a March 2014 suicide bombing at a checkpoint on the outskirts of Hilla, 80km south of the capital, killed 50 people and wounded more than 150.

The death toll will obviously be higher than that.

So to keep up with death tolls from recent attacks: over 200 Iraqi Shia Muslims killed in just one week
 
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