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Rumor Dead Space remake aiming for late 2022 release, will use frostbite - will cut elements that didn't work

mckmas8808

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Sounds like they’re going for the “one continuous shot” presentation that GoW went for.

Should work really well for this game.

It should, but it seems needlessly hard. Not sure why they WANT to do that.
 

Kuranghi

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You know what, I just replayed the ASteroid shooting section LAST NIGHT and...



it wasn't actually bad at all. I did it first try with 75 percent ship health left.

Giant massive butt* though, this is with controller on PC and not the horrendously laggy (like fucking 100s of ms lag) mouse control AND I had to use DS4Windows to add an anti-deadzone to the left and right sticks to make movement and the looking around (when you aren't aiming, thats not as bad but this still helped that too) not feel AWFUL. So that probably helped a fuckton and is a big part of the reason why everyone hates it so much.

*
butts GIF by Janelle Monáe


If you are going to replay Dead Space 1 on PC (Not got to 2 yet but it may be the same) then PM me and I'll give you my anti-deadzone values for both sticks to save you a bit of hassle.
 
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Lucky8BB

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Remakes like demons souls really shows how much technology has changed since PS3 era, so dead space will be almost a new experience. I'm guessing they will make full use from PS5 audio processor (tempest), because sound is also very important in horror games :).

BTW. I hope they will fix controller dead zone!
 

NoobleBear

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I think I heard somewhere that they were going to improve the floating mechanics. Hopefully they don't strip out much, that game is a masterpiece. I don't even remember the asteroid section so I wouldn't miss it if it was chopped lol.
 

scoobidoo112

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Cool! Cut elements that didn't work... Like the microtransactions from 3 right?

Issa Rae Snl GIF by Saturday Night Live

To be fair, the microtransactions in 3 are like the least intrusive ones I can think of. I went 75% of the game without even noticing the option at the bench, and by then I had so much stuff I could craft the most powerful weapons in the game ten times over. So I don't consider that to have "ruined" Dead Space, but it sure was a red flag.
 
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Kuranghi

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All this Dead Space talk has me itching to load it back up on PC. Glad it's Friday!

Do it!

If you are on PC, playing at 4K and have at least a GTX 1070 or equivalent then PM me for nvidia supersampling + transparency AA settings if you like, it looks stellar when supersampled!

If you are playing at 1440p or below then a 1060 is more than enough I think and you can supersample that res for nice improvement too. This is for 60fps, locked.
 

kunonabi

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What are the elements that don't work? i mean beside letting dario argento doing the VA in the italian version of the game...shit was atrociously bad.
The basic progression was boring and repetitive so streamlining that would go a long way.
 

Flabagast

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Chapters changes in DS1 were clear fullscreen menu cuts with loading and change of location, that's a weird definition of continuous uninterrupted shot...
There was no camera cut, it zoomed in and then zoomed out off the loading screen.

gow did it as well when the screen turns into full white for a few seconds in some aeras to load them. If it were black we would call it a cut. Plus in that game you spend so much time in ugly generic menus that it destroys totally the shot continuity imho
 
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So I came in here with the same mindset as a lot of others that have posted in here.

"Elements that didn't work?! Wtf?!"

In my mind there is NOTHING that "didn't work" in the first two games.

Maybe the asteroid defense section? Only part of the game I can think of that breaks up the feel of the game
My brain COMPLETELY removed that part from my memory, lmao. But to be honest, I don't remember it being THAT bad. Maybe I'm misremembering?
 

kunonabi

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So I came in here with the same mindset as a lot of others that have posted in here.

"Elements that didn't work?! Wtf?!"

In my mind there is NOTHING that "didn't work" in the first two games.


My brain COMPLETELY removed that part from my memory, lmao. But to be honest, I don't remember it being THAT bad. Maybe I'm misremembering?
Doing it once isn't a problem. Doing it again and and again is what makes it so awful. It's not hard but it's more filler that the game doesn't need.
 

Perrott

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Super suspicious of this. While Fallen Order has been surprisingly good, I cannot forgive EA for fucking up DS3 and killing Visceral for no reason. And even then, they sabotaged TF2 to get Respawn for cheap, so EA is not to be trusted.
Visceral was an understaffed studio located in an expensive area working on an extremely ambitious title (arguably the most ambitious project being worked on by EA at the time) that was behind schedule for various reasons. Also, they didn't sabotage Titanfall 2, as Respawn themselves were the one to choose the release date for the game.
Also, if EA wanted to show that they were good guys, they would bring on the original DS team as consultants and do everything they said.
What are you talking about? The most notable developers behind Dead Space are either doing The Callisto Protocol for PUBG Corp. or working on a new IP at 2K's 31st Union studio. And what do you mean with having Motive "do everything [the consultants] said"? How do you think game development works? The one who calls the shots on a project is the creative director, not some consultant ffs.
 

Revolutionary

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My brain COMPLETELY removed that part from my memory, lmao. But to be honest, I don't remember it being THAT bad. Maybe I'm misremembering?
Nah, it wasn't that bad. The "problem" was the average gamer isn't observant enough (to put it nicely) and didn't realize the turret had two cannons you can fire from, rather than the one button they've been accustomed to the entire game (R2). So instead of alternating L2 and R2 to fire to reduce heat usage, they just spam or hold onto R2, overheat, and then get destroyed by the asteroids. Then they run to the forums and rage and cry about the game sucking blah blah
 

Zekra Dezivad

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There was no camera cut, it zoomed in and then zoomed out off the loading screen.

gow did it as well when the screen turns into full white for a few seconds in some aeras to load them. If it were black we would call it a cut. Plus in that game you spend so much time in ugly generic menus that it destroys totally the shot continuity imho
You can clearly see the change during the zoom. It was pretty obvious to me.
Also the location jump breaks the idea and feel of continuity too.
They totally went for the one take camera and made some choices accordingly, such as UI and "cinematics". The idea was to make the camera tied to the character most of the time (the zoom beween chapters being the exception, can't remember others if present).

Gow iirc went for a sequence shot instead, where the camera moves around and it can even leave the main character behind. Since it's not tied to the character it can have some freedom with menus and cinematics.
 

zaanan

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Visceral was an understaffed studio located in an expensive area working on an extremely ambitious title (arguably the most ambitious project being worked on by EA at the time) that was behind schedule for various reasons.
And you know this how? That is not what the EA boss said:

Also, they didn't sabotage Titanfall 2, as Respawn themselves were the one to choose the release date for the game.
What is more logical to believe: that someone who made a lot of money from the purchase would say that everything was their idea, which conveniently absolves their new owners from blame? Or that a relatively new studio would purposefully kamikazee their only source of income right at the two biggest competitors they could possibly have?
What are you talking about? The most notable developers behind Dead Space are either doing The Callisto Protocol for PUBG Corp. or working on a new IP at 2K's 31st Union studio. And what do you mean with having Motive "do everything [the consultants] said"? How do you think game development works? The one who calls the shots on a project is the creative director, not some consultant ffs.
I said, “if they wanted to be the good guy.” Nothing is impossible, and people consult on projects all the time. Reasonable people know this, and don’t waste time pretending not to understand how communication works.
 

Perrott

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And you know this how? That is not what the EA boss said:
What the EA boss is nothing more than PR bullshit trying to spin the fact that Visceral Games was not in a position where they'd be able to deliver on Amy Hennig's vision, which resulted in a shutdown of the studio.

Check out some articles on the behind the scenes at Visceral Games and some interviews to former Visceral staff and Hennig herself, you'll see that everything I'm telling you is nothing but the truth.
What is more logical to believe: that someone who made a lot of money from the purchase would say that everything was their idea, which conveniently absolves their new owners from blame? Or that a relatively new studio would purposefully kamikazee their only source of income right at the two biggest competitors they could possibly have?
 

Zannegan

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You know, I miss the days where I wasn't combing every major release announcement looking for the catch. Game publishers have done it to themselves though.
 
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Nah, it wasn't that bad. The "problem" was the average gamer isn't observant enough (to put it nicely) and didn't realize the turret had two cannons you can fire from, rather than the one button they've been accustomed to the entire game (R2). So instead of alternating L2 and R2 to fire to reduce heat usage, they just spam or hold onto R2, overheat, and then get destroyed by the asteroids. Then they run to the forums and rage and cry about the game sucking blah blah
Oh holy shit, it's coming back to me now, I remember NOT having that problem, lmaoooo.
 

Dirk Benedict

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Fetid, rotted, cursed Isz
To be fair, the microtransactions in 3 are like the least intrusive ones I can think of. I went 75% of the game without even noticing the option at the bench, and by then I had so much stuff I could craft the most powerful weapons in the game ten times over. So I don't consider that to have "ruined" Dead Space, but it sure was a red flag.

The WORST part of 3 was sending that fucking robot out to find shit. Who the fuck thought this was a good design decision? Is beyond me.
 

zaanan

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What the EA boss is nothing more than PR bullshit trying to spin the fact that Visceral Games was not in a position where they'd be able to deliver on Amy Hennig's vision, which resulted in a shutdown of the studio.

Check out some articles on the behind the scenes at Visceral Games and some interviews to former Visceral staff and Hennig herself, you'll see that everything I'm telling you is nothing but the truth.
Just read several 2017-2020 interviews with Hennig, Humbach, and other Visceral folks; they all talk about EA forcing multiplayer and pulling people for Hardline and Avengers. None of them say anything about Visceral “not being in a position to deliver on Hennig’s vision.” So, no.

...Dismisses one PR statement as bullshit, presents other PR statements/rumours as fact...
Futurama Squinting GIF
 

Perrott

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Just read several 2017-2020 interviews with Hennig, Humbach, and other Visceral folks; they all talk about EA forcing multiplayer and pulling people for Hardline and Avengers. None of them say anything about Visceral “not being in a position to deliver on Hennig’s vision.” So, no.
During the development of Hardline, many people specialized in the development of third-person action/adventure games (what Visceral was known for up to that point) left the studio to join Crystal Dynamics, while FPS experts were hired to work on Battlefield. After Hardline wrapped up, Hennig and her team were left with what basically was a shooter studio and weren't given the OK by EA to rebuild Visceral into what it was before due to the cost of hiring new people in San Francisco's Bay Area. EA's solution to this problem was to have Jade Raymond's recently established Montreal-based studio Motive lend Visceral a hand with the development of their Star Wars game, but what happened was that shortly after Motive was up and running they were given the task to develop the Star Wars: Battlefront 2 singleplayer campaign, which brought back the staff-related problems to the development of Ragtag. EA Vancouver came in later on to help out, but by then it was too late already.

On top of that, the team was having serious issues reworking Frostbite into an engine capable of delivering a third-person action/adventure game, as it was lacking various features and tools that were a given to Amy back when she was making Uncharted games over at Naughty Dog.

So yeah, an understaffed studio doing a game that was trying to go surpass Naughty Dog's Uncharted 4 on an engine that, at the time, wasn't prepared for handling these type of games. It surely sounds to me as that Visceral as a studio "was not in a position to deliver on Hennig's vision [Star Wars Uncharted]" back then.
...Dismisses one PR statement as bullshit, presents other PR statements/rumours as fact...
Futurama Squinting GIF
The Patrick Sotherlund statement about them revamping Ragtag entirely mainly based off the fact that it was a linear singleplayer game was simply not true, that's why I'm dismissing it, because if there was any truth to his words, then Jedi Fallen Order (which was heavily marketed as a singleplayer game with no MTX or loot boxes) would've been canned as well, but we all know that wasn't the case.

And what PR statement had I presented in my previous post? As far as I know, I just posted two tweets, in one of which Jason Schreier (arguably the most accurate source in the industry when it comes to Electronic Arts reporting) actually verifies the claims made in the other tweet about how Respawn wasn't forced by EA to release Titanfall 2 on that date.
 
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zaanan

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During the development of Hardline, many people specialized in the development of third-person action/adventure games (what Visceral was known for up to that point) left the studio to join Crystal Dynamics, while FPS experts were hired to work on Battlefield. After Hardline wrapped up, Hennig and her team were left with what basically was a shooter studio and weren't given the OK by EA to rebuild Visceral into what it was before due to the cost of hiring new people in San Francisco's Bay Area. EA's solution to this problem was to have Jade Raymond's recently established Montreal-based studio Motive lend Visceral a hand with the development of their Star Wars game, but what happened was that shortly after Motive was up and running they were given the task to develop the Star Wars: Battlefront 2 singleplayer campaign, which brought back the staff-related problems to the development of Ragtag. EA Vancouver came in later on to help out, but by then it was too late already.

On top of that, the team was having serious issues reworking Frostbite into an engine capable of delivering a third-person action/adventure game, as it was lacking various features and tools that were a given to Amy back when she was making Uncharted games over at Naughty Dog.

So yeah, an understaffed studio doing a game that was trying to go surpass Naughty Dog's Uncharted 4 on an engine that, at the time, wasn't prepared for handling these type of games. It surely sounds to me as that Visceral as a studio "was not in a position to deliver on Hennig's vision [Star Wars Uncharted]" back then.

The Patrick Sotherlund statement about them revamping Ragtag entirely mainly based off the fact that it was a linear singleplayer game was simply not true, that's why I'm dismissing it, because if there was any truth to his words, then Jedi Fallen Order (which was heavily marketed as a singleplayer game with no MTX or loot boxes) would've been canned as well, but we all know that wasn't the case.

And what PR statement had I presented in my previous post? As far as I know, I just posted two tweets, in one of which Jason Schreier (arguably the most accurate source in the industry when it comes to Electronic Arts reporting) actually verifies the claims made in the other tweet about how Respawn wasn't forced by EA to release Titanfall 2 on that date.
In a way, I am glad you are being such an intractable donkey about this, because I am finding out all kinds of juicy details in researching it. The problems with development you bring up (most of which are true) actually all had to do with EA, not Hennig: EA mandated the shitty Dice engine according to Humbach, who was not happy about it, because Visceral already had a great engine. According to him and other Visceral folks, they had an awesome demo where an ATST was chasing you; none of them say it was shitty. But EA didn’t like it. So it wasn’t Hennig’s vision that was the issue. Rather, they had trouble living up to EA’s “vision.”

You are also forgetting the timeline; EA was overseeing development of Battlefront 2 at the time, and we all know how that turned out, with all the shitty MTX etc. It was during that time that they pulled Motive off Ragtag and forbid Visceral from hiring anybody. Again, 100% EA, not Hennig.

Since you seem to be fixated on Hennig, here is what she had to say about the pivot back to singleplayer with Fallen Order:
“In April 2019, EA announced a new single-player game, Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order, to be released later that year and developed by Respawn Entertainment. Hennig stated that this seemed like a change of strategy related to the criticism that EA received after its closure of Visceral and its strong indication that it was moving away from single-player games.[3]
In that statement, she totally destroys the idea that EA was NOT previously moving away from singleplayer. Since she was in the best position to know, I am going to believe her instead of you, Random Internet Guy.

As for the timing of TF2, my previous statement stands. Keywords being “only source of income” and “kamikaze.” And if you think that “higher-ups” leaking a statement to somebody is not a form of PR, I have a bridge to sell you.
 

Perrott

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In a way, I am glad you are being such an intractable donkey about this, because I am finding out all kinds of juicy details in researching it. The problems with development you bring up (most of which are true) actually all had to do with EA, not Hennig: EA mandated the shitty Dice engine according to Humbach, who was not happy about it, because Visceral already had a great engine. According to him and other Visceral folks, they had an awesome demo where an ATST was chasing you; none of them say it was shitty. But EA didn’t like it. So it wasn’t Hennig’s vision that was the issue. Rather, they had trouble living up to EA’s “vision.”

You are also forgetting the timeline; EA was overseeing development of Battlefront 2 at the time, and we all know how that turned out, with all the shitty MTX etc. It was during that time that they pulled Motive off Ragtag and forbid Visceral from hiring anybody. Again, 100% EA, not Hennig.
You seem to be focusing away from the point.

My point is not about Hennig or her vision, but rather that the team was facing X, Y and Z problems (namely the staff issues, the Frostbite engine, etc), most of them a result of EA's management, and because of that Ragtag had become this sort of extremely ambitious project that was not coming together both in the production and creative side of things, as the game was behind schedule (the game had already been delayed once from Spring 2018 to the holidays and a planned multiplayer component had to be scrapped because of time constraints) and not ticking all the boxes ("where's your Portal Gun?"; "where's Chewbacca?", etc) the producers wanted out of the game itself.

And those were the reasons that led to the game's cancellation and why Ragtag didn't work at that studio at that time. And this is what I believed that we were arguing about, because in your first post you stated that EA "killed Visceral for no reason" and this is me telling you that there were reasons behind the closure of Visceral, even if EA is to blame for most of those reasons.
Since you seem to be fixated on Hennig, here is what she had to say about the pivot back to singleplayer with Fallen Order:
“In April 2019, EA announced a new single-player game, Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order, to be released later that year and developed by Respawn Entertainment. Hennig stated that this seemed like a change of strategy related to the criticism that EA received after its closure of Visceral and its strong indication that it was moving away from single-player games.[3]
In that statement, she totally destroys the idea that EA was NOT previously moving away from singleplayer. Since she was in the best position to know, I am going to believe her instead of you, Random Internet Guy.
Ragtag entered development back in early 2015, while Jedi Fallen Order got started as late as early 2016, so both games (linear singleplayer action/adventure games) were in development at the same time and one of them managed to come out nicely while the other didn't, so it becomes clear that the issue with Ragtag was not about it being a singleplayer adventure.
 

zaanan

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You seem to be focusing away from the point.

My point is not about Hennig or her vision, but rather that the team was facing X, Y and Z problems (namely the staff issues, the Frostbite engine, etc), most of them a result of EA's management, and because of that Ragtag had become this sort of extremely ambitious project that was not coming together both in the production and creative side of things, as the game was behind schedule (the game had already been delayed once from Spring 2018 to the holidays and a planned multiplayer component had to be scrapped because of time constraints) and not ticking all the boxes ("where's your Portal Gun?"; "where's Chewbacca?", etc) the producers wanted out of the game itself.

And those were the reasons that led to the game's cancellation and why Ragtag didn't work at that studio at that time. And this is what I believed that we were arguing about, because in your first post you stated that EA "killed Visceral for no reason" and this is me telling you that there were reasons behind the closure of Visceral, even if EA is to blame for most of those reasons.
Really? You really cannot see that EA purposely fucking with Visceral (a world-class developer) to kill the game & studio = EA killing the studio for no reason?
Ragtag entered development back in early 2015, while Jedi Fallen Order got started as late as early 2016, so both games (linear singleplayer action/adventure games) were in development at the same time and one of them managed to come out nicely while the other didn't, so it becomes clear that the issue with Ragtag was not about it being a singleplayer adventure.
Nope. Timeline:
  1. Visceral starts Ragtag in 2013
  2. Respawn starts Fallen Order in 2014
  3. EA releases BF Nov 2015
  4. BF success convinces EA MP is All
  5. EA begins throwing roadblocks at Ragtag due to SP/linear/no Force
  6. EA murders Ragtag & Visceral Oct 2017
  7. EA releases BF2 Nov 2017
  8. Internet spanks EA over BF2 MTX
  9. EA buys Respawn Dec 2017
  10. Respawn releases Fallen Order Nov 2019
This ain’t rocket surgery. EA had a completely different mindset before the BF2 controversy. After that, they were in damage control mode, so they backtracked bigly to try and gain back goodwill.
 

Perrott

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Really? You really cannot see that EA purposely fucking with Visceral (a world-class developer) to kill the game & studio = EA killing the studio for no reason?

Nope. Timeline:
  1. Visceral starts Ragtag in 2013
  2. Respawn starts Fallen Order in 2014
  3. EA releases BF Nov 2015
  4. BF success convinces EA MP is All
  5. EA begins throwing roadblocks at Ragtag due to SP/linear/no Force
  6. EA murders Ragtag & Visceral Oct 2017
  7. EA releases BF2 Nov 2017
  8. Internet spanks EA over BF2 MTX
  9. EA buys Respawn Dec 2017
  10. Respawn releases Fallen Order Nov 2019
This ain’t rocket surgery. EA had a completely different mindset before the BF2 controversy. After that, they were in damage control mode, so they backtracked bigly to try and gain back goodwill.
Your timeline is wrong:
  1. Early 2013: Visceral starts working on a pirate new IP codenamed Jamaica.
  2. Spring 2013: EA gets the Star Wars license and puts Visceral, DICE and Bioware at work on the IP; it was then that Jamaica morphed into a space pirates Star Wars game codenamed Yuma; at this point it is safe to assume that BF Hardline was already deep into production at Visceral alongside Yuma, which was in super early planning/concept stages.
  3. Early 2014: Uncharted 4 gets rebooted and Amy Hennig quits Naughty Dog; gets hired by Visceral and put in charge of the Star Wars game, although work on that title gets put on hold until the completion of BF Hardline, for which Hennig provided some writing during that time.
  4. Late 2014: Stig Asmussen joins Respawn and starts working on an action/adventure new IP for EA.
  5. Early 2015: BF Hardline releases; part of Visceral gets put to work on Hardline DLC, while others move on to the Star Wars game, which by now had already been rebooted by Hennig and turned into Ragtag, a linear action/adventure game (basically Star Wars Uncharted) where you'd pull of "heists" in a similar fashion to the Ocean Eleven movie by swapping between multiple playable characters; it was now that they realized that they were short of staff and that the Frostbite engine would prove troublesome, as many of the features and tools required to make this type of game just weren't there.
  6. Mid 2015: EA and Jade Raymond establish a studio in Montreal to not only help Visceral out with Ragtag, but also to work on a new open-world action/adventure IP down the line; at this point, the plan was to get the game out in May 2018 (just in time for the release of Solo: A Star Wars Story) with both the singleplayer campaign and a secondary multiplayer mode focused on space combat.
  7. Late 2015: Star Wars: Battlefront comes out and receives tons of criticism in regards to the lack of a story mode.
  8. Sometime in 2015: Respawn are given the keys to the Star Wars IP, which results in them turning Stig's new action/adventure IP into a Star Wars Jedi game.
  9. Early 2016: Motive are taken off the Ragtag project in order to develop a singleplayer campaign for Star Wars: Battlefront II; this resulted in Visceral scrapping the plans for the secondary multiplayer mode and focusing all of their very few resources on the campaign.
  10. Spring 2016: EA announces at Star Wars Celebration that Respawn entertainment would be developing a third-person action/adventure Star Wars game.
  11. E3 2016: The Star Wars: Battlefront II singleplayer campaign coming in 2017 (Motive), a linear singleplayer TPS action/adventure Star Wars game coming in 2018 (Visceral) and a linear singleplayer action/adventure Star Wars Jedi game (Respawn) are teased at EA Play; also at E3, Visceral showed off a fragment of footage from a larger demo they had been developing, which didn't have any one the core gameplay features implemented (such as shooting for instance), but was very nice looking thanks to the collaboration with both Industrial Light & Magic and Sony's Visual Arts Group, which helped develop some top-notch visuals for Ragtag; this helped buy the project some time in EA's eyes.
  12. Throughout 2016: Visceral's staff issues grew bigger as the company was bleeding people dozens of people and on top of that there kept being clashes not only between Visceral and EA/Lucasfilm, but also between the people at the studio and creative director Amy Hennig, as they both had different ways of doing things.
  13. Late 2016: The staffing problems at Visceral reach a critical point, so EA comes up with a plan to have their Vancouver studio help out with the game as they had a team free of work to do over there following the cancellation of a Plants vs Zombies game; by now Ragtag had already been delayed to December 2018.
  14. Early 2017: EA Vancouver joins the development of Ragtag.
  15. Throughout 2017: Even though there was a clash of cultures between Visceral and Vancouver and there was a ton of back and forth and drama about which studio would make the calls in regards to certain features within the game (like the cover system), Ragtag was able to make some progress and the teams worked on a series of demos (namely the AT-ST chase, the Tatoone shootout, an infiltration into Jabba's Palace, etc) to showcase to EA executives later in the year.
  16. October 2017: After reviewing the latest handful of demos from the game, EA took the decision to shutdown Visceral, move the game over to EA Vancouver and rework it entirely as an open-world Star Wars title codenamed Orca; they also bought Respawn at the end of the month (who at the time were working in Jedi Fallen Order, another singleplayer action/adventure Star Wars game).
  17. November 2017: Star Wars: Battlefront II comes out and the whole lootbox debacle happens.
  18. Early 2019: EA Vancouver's open-world Star Wars game, Orca, gets cancelled.
  19. November 2019: Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order comes out.
What happened was a result of many variables and a serious mismanagement of the workforce and resources over at EA studios by Patrick Sotherlund, Jade Raymond and other executives, as well as of culture clashes between Visceral, Vancouver, Lucasfilm, EA management and Amy Hennig; but it was definitely not a result of EA purposefully sabotaging the development of one of their key titles, while burning millions and millions worth of resources in the process.
 
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zaanan

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Your timeline is wrong:
  1. Early 2013: Visceral starts working on a pirate new IP codenamed Jamaica.
  2. Spring 2013: EA gets the Star Wars license and puts Visceral, DICE and Bioware at work on the IP; it was then that Jamaica morphed into a space pirates Star Wars game codenamed Yuma; at this point it is safe to assume that BF Hardline was already deep into production at Visceral alongside Yuma, which was in super early planning/concept stages.
  3. Early 2014: Uncharted 4 gets rebooted and Amy Hennig quits Naughty Dog; gets hired by Visceral and put in charge of the Star Wars game, although work on that title gets put on hold until the completion of BF Hardline, for which Hennig provided some writing during that time.
  4. Late 2014: Stig Asmussen joins Respawn and starts working on an action/adventure new IP for EA.
  5. Early 2015: BF Hardline releases; part of Visceral gets put to work on Hardline DLC, while others move on to the Star Wars game, which by now had already been rebooted by Hennig and turned into Ragtag, a linear action/adventure game (basically Star Wars Uncharted) where you'd pull of "heists" in a similar fashion to the Ocean Eleven movie by swapping between multiple playable characters; it was now that they realized that they were short of staff and that the Frostbite engine would prove troublesome, as many of the features and tools required to make this type of game just weren't there.
  6. Mid 2015: EA and Jade Raymond establish a studio in Montreal to not only help Visceral out with Ragtag, but also to work on a new open-world action/adventure IP down the line; at this point, the plan was to get the game out in May 2018 (just in time for the release of Solo: A Star Wars Story) with both the singleplayer campaign and a secondary multiplayer mode focused on space combat.
  7. Late 2015: Star Wars: Battlefront comes out and receives tons of criticism in regards to the lack of a story mode.
  8. Sometime in 2015: Respawn are given the keys to the Star Wars IP, which results in them turning Stig's new action/adventure IP into a Star Wars Jedi game.
  9. Early 2016: Motive are taken off the Ragtag project in order to develop a singleplayer campaign for Star Wars: Battlefront II; this resulted in Visceral scrapping the plans for the secondary multiplayer mode and focusing all of their very few resources on the campaign.
  10. Spring 2016: EA announces at Star Wars Celebration that Respawn entertainment would be developing a third-person action/adventure Star Wars game.
  11. E3 2016: The Star Wars: Battlefront II singleplayer campaign coming in 2017 (Motive), a linear singleplayer TPS action/adventure Star Wars game coming in 2018 (Visceral) and a linear singleplayer action/adventure Star Wars Jedi game (Respawn) are teased at EA Play; also at E3, Visceral showed off a fragment of footage from a larger demo they had been developing, which didn't have any one the core gameplay features implemented (such as shooting for instance), but was very nice looking thanks to the collaboration with both Industrial Light & Magic and Sony's Visual Arts Group, which helped develop some top-notch visuals for Ragtag; this helped buy the project some time in EA's eyes.
  12. Throughout 2016: Visceral's staff issues grew bigger as the company was bleeding people dozens of people and on top of that there kept being clashes not only between Visceral and EA/Lucasfilm, but also between the people at the studio and creative director Amy Hennig, as they both had different ways of doing things.
  13. Late 2016: The staffing problems at Visceral reach a critical point, so EA comes up with a plan to have their Vancouver studio help out with the game as they had a team free of work to do over there following the cancellation of a Plants vs Zombies game; by now Ragtag had already been delayed to December 2018.
  14. Early 2017: EA Vancouver joins the development of Ragtag.
  15. Throughout 2017: Even though there was a clash of cultures between Visceral and Vancouver and there was a ton of back and forth and drama about which studio would make the calls in regards to certain features within the game (like the cover system), Ragtag was able to make some progress and the teams worked on a series of demos (namely the AT-ST chase, the Tatoone shootout, an infiltration into Jabba's Palace, etc) to showcase to EA executives later in the year.
  16. October 2017: After reviewing the latest handful of demos from the game, EA took the decision to shutdown Visceral, move the game over to EA Vancouver and rework it entirely as an open-world Star Wars title codenamed Orca; they also bought Respawn at the end of the month (who at the time were working in Jedi Fallen Order, another singleplayer action/adventure Star Wars game).
  17. November 2017: Star Wars: Battlefront II comes out and the whole lootbox debacle happens.
  18. Early 2019: EA Vancouver's open-world Star Wars game, Orca, gets cancelled.
  19. November 2019: Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order comes out.
What happened was a result of many variables and a serious mismanagement of the workforce and resources over at EA studios by Patrick Sotherlund, Jade Raymond and other executives, as well as of culture clashes between Visceral, Vancouver, Lucasfilm, EA management and Amy Hennig; but it was definitely not a result of EA purposefully sabotaging the development of one of their key titles, while burning millions and millions worth of resources in the process.
That timeline looks suspiciously close to the one I posted, to the point where any differences are merely academic. Have you heard of violent agreement?

I am done arguing with you; argue with these guys - who were there - instead:






 
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