DF/JF: Battlefield 4 PS4 vs XB1 videos/screens (900p PS4, 720p XB1)

#1
Better IGN comparison: http://www.ign.com/videos/2013/10/28/battlefield-4-xbox-oneps4-graphics-comparison

Update on DF's footage:

The issue here is simple; Tom had a limited amount of time to capture this stuff and was not able to do so in a normal environment. If mistakes were made normally, it would be easy to go back and correct, but with the way this worked, it wasn't really possible.

Why so different? DF uses their own hardware for capturing while DICE were handing out Elgato boxes to everyone else. The DF hardware is actually much more capable but it works differently and, without the experience of working with these new consoles, I can see a situation where settings were dialed in wrong.

JF used what DICE provided and probably didn't even attempt to change any settings which, in this case, turned out to be for the best.
Heading to the shelter.

Videogamer.com comparison: http://www.videogamer.com/features/article/battlefield_4_which_is_better_xbox_one_or_ps4.html
Comparison video
PS4 vs XB1 framerate tests
Jack Xbox: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g0ycN0re_5A&feature=youtu.be
Jack PS4: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9oWkgNO2coc&feature=youtu.be


Needless to say, there are some basic differences in image quality that need knocking on the head right away. Chief among them is the hot topic of internal resolution, where we determine that the Xbox One code is indeed running at 1280x720. If this is set in stone for release - as is likely - the Microsoft version is poised to give us the most aliasing of the two next-gen platforms by a noticeable degree, and is only a stone's throw from the sub-720p resolutions of current-gen releases. On the other hand, the PS4 version delivers a whopping 1600x900 resolution in all modes, giving it a 50 per cent lead in output pixels overall. As well as cutting down on jagged edges, this reduces the amount of pixel shimmer we see in motion on complex shaders or thin geometry, with distant power lines, scaffolding and other elements with sub-pixel elements creating unwanted flickering on Xbox One.
But the differences we saw don't just stop at resolution. Both versions are treated to post-processing anti-aliasing too, seemingly equivalent to the refined, high setting on PC. However, this doesn't tell the whole story. As you may notice in our screengrabs, the actual results on PS4 lack the corresponding level of crystal clarity we'd expect of such a significant resolution boost. This should surely be a home run for Sony's console, but what is likely to be a software-based upscale to 1080p delivers less-than-stellar returns, and for better or worse leaves the Xbox One with an often crisper looking, albeit much more aliased image.
Having moved ahead in terms of image quality, there's no doubt that Sony's new platform comes out on top overall in the performance metrics too. This is best demonstrated in matching sequences, such as a cut-scene on a Shanghai river where it commands a constant 2-4fps lead, and likewise during the tearing apart of a battleship. In terms of gameplay, the gap widens further during the cannister explosion on the Fishing in Baku stage, with a disparity at well above these numbers - the PS4 regaining 60fps much faster than the fluctuating Xbox One code. We see occasional XO wins in like-for-like testing too, but in our single-player tests, it is clearly the PS4 code that is in the ascendant.
On the merits of what we've seen so far, Battlefield 4 is already set to be a formidable launch window effort from DICE. Our observations so far reveal a clear gap in fidelity between PC and PS4, and again to Xbox One, but sub-pixel break-up aside, based on what we've seen so far, the Microsoft console manages to hold up despite the undeniable, quantifiably worse metrics in terms of both resolution and frame-rate.
http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/digitalfoundry-battlefield-4-next-gen-vs-pc-face-off-preview

aa comparison

One



PS4



edit: jayu26: done.
As a note the DF videos have kind of poor quality compared to Jack Frags:

Alright here we go.

Here is the Jack upload vs. the DF upload screens





Top is the DF video, you can see the crushed blacks

Bottom is the Jack upload, same scene you can see the difference in the wheel black
















 
#7
Needless to say, there are some basic differences in image quality that need knocking on the head right away. Chief among them is the hot topic of internal resolution, where we determine that the Xbox One code is indeed running at 1280x720. If this is set in stone for release - as is likely - the Microsoft version is poised to give us the most aliasing of the two next-gen platforms by a noticeable degree, and is only a stone's throw from the sub-720p resolutions of current-gen releases. On the other hand, the PS4 version delivers a whopping 1600x900 resolution in all modes, giving it a 50 per cent lead in output pixels overall. As well as cutting down on jagged edges, this reduces the amount of pixel shimmer we see in motion on complex shaders or thin geometry, with distant power lines, scaffolding and other elements with sub-pixel elements creating unwanted flickering on Xbox One.
A pretty big deal.
 

MThanded

I Was There! Official L Receiver 2/12/2016
#14
Shit PS4 with that next level domination.

On the merits of what we've seen so far, Battlefield 4 is already set to be a formidable launch window effort from DICE. Our observations so far reveal a clear gap in fidelity between PC and PS4, and again to Xbox One, but sub-pixel break-up aside, based on what we've seen so far, the Microsoft console manages to hold up despite the undeniable, quantifiably worse metrics in terms of both resolution and frame-rate.
Bye

Shinobi didn't even post the article. Damn son. You are fluking.
 

Vire

DancingJesus
#15
How about posting the article?...

There's no doubt resolution is a big differentiator when it comes to image quality, with the PC untouchable here on its ultra settings. The PS4 version runs at 1600x900, while the Xbox One's lower 720p resolution brings out the most aliasing.
 
#24
Chief among them is the hot topic of internal resolution, where we determine that the Xbox One code is indeed running at 1280x720. If this is set in stone for release - as is likely - the Microsoft version is poised to give us the most aliasing of the two next-gen platforms by a noticeable degree, and is only a stone's throw from the sub-720p resolutions of current-gen releases. On the other hand, the PS4 version delivers a whopping 1600x900 resolution in all modes, giving it a 50 per cent lead in output pixels overall. As well as cutting down on jagged edges, this reduces the amount of pixel shimmer we see in motion on complex shaders or thin geometry, with distant power lines, scaffolding and other elements with sub-pixel elements creating unwanted flickering on Xbox One.
Months of speculation, spin, and denial have come to an end this evening.
 
#25
So PS4 version does look better and at 900p, while Xbone lacks AO effects and is at 720p...
There's no doubt resolution is a big differentiator when it comes to image quality, with the PC untouchable here on its ultra settings. The PS4 version runs at 1600x900, while the Xbox One's lower 720p resolution brings out the most aliasing.
 
#26
But the differences we saw don't just stop at resolution. Both versions are treated to post-processing anti-aliasing too, seemingly equivalent to the refined, high setting on PC. However, this doesn't tell the whole story. As you may notice in our screengrabs, the actual results on PS4 lack the corresponding level of crystal clarity we'd expect of such a significant resolution boost. This should surely be a home run for Sony's console, but what is likely to be a software-based upscale to 1080p delivers less-than-stellar returns, and for better or worse leaves the Xbox One with an often crisper looking, albeit much more aliased image.

What is curious is the level of "pop" given to the Xbox One's textures, where - bizarrely - artwork often seems to be more detailed than on PlayStation 4. In high contrast scenes, we sometimes see a kind of halo effect around some detail, which may suggest some kind of artificial detail-boosting post-process. Whether this is part of Microsoft's new upscaling tech remains to be seen, but we were reminded of the Medal of Honor effect seen in the Darbee Darblet review. However, what is added to texture detail also seems to be applied to XO's most ugly element - its highly noticeable sub-pixel break-up.
 
#35
1280x720 vs 1600x900...but the worse textures on PS4 is puzzling (according to the article, watching now)...what would be the explanation for this (other than MS money hatting, etc, etc)
 
#41
Needless to say, there are some basic differences in image quality that need knocking on the head right away. Chief among them is the hot topic of internal resolution, where we determine that the Xbox One code is indeed running at 1280x720. If this is set in stone for release - as is likely - the Microsoft version is poised to give us the most aliasing of the two next-gen platforms by a noticeable degree, and is only a stone's throw from the sub-720p resolutions of current-gen releases. On the other hand, the PS4 version delivers a whopping 1600x900 resolution in all modes, giving it a 50 per cent lead in output pixels overall. As well as cutting down on jagged edges, this reduces the amount of pixel shimmer we see in motion on complex shaders or thin geometry, with distant power lines, scaffolding and other elements with sub-pixel elements creating unwanted flickering on Xbox One.
 
#43
Needs to be put in OP I think.

Needless to say, there are some basic differences in image quality that need knocking on the head right away. Chief among them is the hot topic of internal resolution, where we determine that the Xbox One code is indeed running at 1280x720. If this is set in stone for release - as is likely - the Microsoft version is poised to give us the most aliasing of the two next-gen platforms by a noticeable degree, and is only a stone's throw from the sub-720p resolutions of current-gen releases. On the other hand, the PS4 version delivers a whopping 1600x900 resolution in all modes, giving it a 50 per cent lead in output pixels overall. As well as cutting down on jagged edges, this reduces the amount of pixel shimmer we see in motion on complex shaders or thin geometry, with distant power lines, scaffolding and other elements with sub-pixel elements creating unwanted flickering on Xbox One.
Edit** Already did ;]
 
#49
Somethings not right here...

DF shows a glarey version for the PS4 and a richer version for the XB1, while the other sites are declaring 900p for PS4 vs. 720p for XB1?

What's going on here?