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Do Kojima's games not get enough credit for something?

Jan 25, 2018
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Something I've never heard people talk about when it comes to some of Hideo Kojima's games is the creep factor.

Yes creepy, I've always found a few of his games to be have a mildly creepy, eerie atmosphere, nothing major, but still something I've felt but have never seen mentioned by anyone else, is it just me?

Metal Gear Solid with it's nighttime, snowy atmosphere, dank, dark hallways or moments like seeing the hallway with all the dead bodies for the first time or the fight against Psycho Mantis, I would definitely describe the game as having an eerie atmosphere at times.

Metal Gear Solid 2 less so, but definitely as the game gets more mind bending near the end, it gets fairly creepy and the music during Arsenal's Guts is creepy.

Then we have Zone of The Enders and for some reason that's a game that has always creeped me out, weird I know, but something about being on a nighttime space station totally devoid of human life, with even the enemies being AI drones and the eerie music, always creeped me out somewhat.

But that's about it, I don't think much of anything in MGS3 was creepy, other than the fight with The Sorrow, and I didn't find anything to be creepy in MGS4 or MGS5 at all.

But the one time he did make a full on horror game, PT, it was so damn scary that people are still talking about it 5 years later even though it's a game made up mostly of two hallways and a bathroom, which I think proves Kojima does have some chops in creeping you out.

I look forward to seeing what he has in store with Death Stranding, which definitely looks to have horror elements to me.
 

brap

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Jan 9, 2018
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Metal Gear Solid with it's nighttime, snowy atmosphere, dank, dark hallways or moments like seeing the hallway with all the dead bodies for the first time or the fight against Psycho Mantis, I would definitely describe the game as having an eerie atmosphere at times.
Most PS1 games are pretty eerie.

Metal Gear Solid 2 less so, but definitely as the game gets more mind bending near the end, it gets fairly creepy and the music during Arsenal's Guts is creepy.
Yeah, some of the stuff near the end is kinda creepy like the the codec convos.
 

Harry Tung

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Jun 1, 2018
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I don´t think he gets enough credit for his wonderfully deceptive and confusing trailers that he releases. He is like the only auteur I can think of that actually uses the medium in an artistic and profound way to promote his games, leaving a sort of mystery and charm too it, and all he gets is a ton of shit for it. Kojima is like the Ingmar Bergman of games and people hate him for it. Crazy.
 
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LordRaptor

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Aug 20, 2015
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Oh, I thought you were talking about the creep factor of using your ingame camera for upskirt panty shots, and all the other perving he builds in.

Because he is well known for his creep factor in that respect, and nobody is ashamed of their words or deeds.
 
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Jigsaah

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Jan 31, 2018
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If the cancelled Silent Hill reboot was any indication, I'm pretty sure that shit is very intentional. Look at MGSV and the Skulls. They are part zombie, part ninja, part commando all wrapped in a package full of mist and flying insects (probably nanobots). WTF is scarier than that?
 

VertigoOA

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Jan 15, 2018
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The MGS series had tons of creepy and tense moments. There was always a horror element present in all of them.

Who doesn’t remember walking thru a river of throatless m’fers in Snake Eater... that shit was amazing!

I don’t mean to sound too excited about it... like it was genuinely horrific but goddamn that was so cool.
 
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bad

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Nov 5, 2013
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Something I've never heard people talk about when it comes to some of Hideo Kojima's games is the creep factor.

Yes creepy, I've always found a few of his games to be have a mildly creepy, eerie atmosphere, nothing major, but still something I've felt but have never seen mentioned by anyone else, is it just me?

Metal Gear Solid with it's nighttime, snowy atmosphere, dank, dark hallways or moments like seeing the hallway with all the dead bodies for the first time or the fight against Psycho Mantis, I would definitely describe the game as having an eerie atmosphere at times.

Metal Gear Solid 2 less so, but definitely as the game gets more mind bending near the end, it gets fairly creepy and the music during Arsenal's Guts is creepy.

Then we have Zone of The Enders and for some reason that's a game that has always creeped me out, weird I know, but something about being on a nighttime space station totally devoid of human life, with even the enemies being AI drones and the eerie music, always creeped me out somewhat.

But that's about it, I don't think much of anything in MGS3 was creepy, other than the fight with The Sorrow, and I didn't find anything to be creepy in MGS4 or MGS5 at all.

But the one time he did make a full on horror game, PT, it was so damn scary that people are still talking about it 5 years later even though it's a game made up mostly of two hallways and a bathroom, which I think proves Kojima does have some chops in creeping you out.

I look forward to seeing what he has in store with Death Stranding, which definitely looks to have horror elements to me.
Zone of Enders isn’t a Kojima game. He’s the producer and opening cutscene creator.

IGNPS2: Has Kojima-san had much influence into the game's design?

Okamura: Mr. Kojima is the producer. He's created the perfect environment where our team can create the best game we can. Nowadays, he's been giving us a lot of useful hints and tips regarding the actual development of the game.
Interview with the Director and Writer, Noriaki Okamura.
Source
 
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Kamfair55

Neo Member
Jul 22, 2019
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Something I've never heard people talk about when it comes to some of Hideo Kojima's games is the creep factor.

Yes creepy, I've always found a few of his games to be have a mildly creepy, eerie atmosphere, nothing major, but still something I've felt but have never seen mentioned by anyone else, is it just me?

Metal Gear Solid with it's nighttime, snowy atmosphere, dank, dark hallways or moments like seeing the hallway with all the dead bodies for the first time or the fight against Psycho Mantis, I would definitely describe the game as having an eerie atmosphere at times.

Metal Gear Solid 2 less so, but definitely as the game gets more mind bending near the end, it gets fairly creepy and the music during Arsenal's Guts is creepy.

Then we have Zone of The Enders and for some reason that's a game that has always creeped me out, weird I know, but something about being on a nighttime space station totally devoid of human life, with even the enemies being AI drones and the eerie music, always creeped me out somewhat.

But that's about it, I don't think much of anything in MGS3 was creepy, other than the fight with The Sorrow, and I didn't find anything to be creepy in MGS4 or MGS5 at all.

But the one time he did make a full on horror game, PT, it was so damn scary that people are still talking about it 5 years later even though it's a game made up mostly of two hallways and a bathroom, which I think proves Kojima does have some chops in creeping you out.

I look forward to seeing what he has in store with Death Stranding, which definitely looks to have horror elements to me.
Definitely has a creep factor even the bosses are creepy. Imo journalists fail to get the message in the mgs games or how deep it is or true to life they seem to get hung up and over exaggerate the plot elements, I never had a problem with the cutscenes either
 

longdi

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Jun 7, 2004
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Whenever i play a MGS, it felt refreshing, like fresh outta the shower after a hot humid day.
Except MGSV, as i mentioned, low fov + shakey cam, makes me giddy, that is so sad. :(
Looking forward to DS on my Ryzen 3950X next year, hopefully he ditchs the shakey cam or i have to get steam refund.
 

#Phonepunk#

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Sep 4, 2018
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i find it interesting that nobody ever talks about the actual geopolitical stories in his games. everyone is always focused on the sci fi & fantasy elements, or just trashing the writing and plot outright, people ignore the military stuff that is foundational to the story. when in reality, the war economy focused stuff is some of the strongest parts of his games. MGS where Hal goes on that long rant about nuclear proliferation was the moment i really signed onto this series. it is not often that new sci fi manages to talk about real world issues these days. MGS2 has this great moment when you are infiltrating a ship trying to find the metal gear and you come upon a roomful of soldiers & officers watching someone give a presentation on the metal gear. it is a sort of parody of power point/slide slow presentations for weapons systems, which is a real thing that goes on, only here, they are talking about giant robots. at one point he says "The only way to stop a bad guy with a metal gear, is a good guy with a metal gear." which felt eerily similar to pro-war and pro-gun propaganda.

similarly i read many articles and watched many reviews and deep dives into MGSV and not once did anyone cover the IRL conflict in which the game takes place, the initial Afghanistan proxy war between America and Russia. Kojima chose this setting both because it fit with his timeline and it signaled both the "end" of the Cold War and the continuation of global militaristic imperialism. it is odd, being an America citizen, to see this game, to see our forces over there fighting STILL, nearly 40 years later. The Phantom Pain has us rescue Kaz, who is working with the Mujihadeen, the way real US CIA agents were. the game world demonstrates this, with empty villages dotting the war-torn landscape, and propaganda billboards dotting the mountainside, demonstrating the collaboration between Western and Extremist Fundamentalist forces against the Soviets. it is a weird piece of geopolitical nostalgia, one that goes entirely un-commented upon, cos people have to crap on Konami or the game for being "unfinished "for the millionth time.
 
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Jan 11, 2019
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i find it interesting that nobody ever talks about the actual geopolitical stories in his games. everyone is always focused on the sci fi & fantasy elements, or just trashing the writing and plot outright, people ignore the military stuff that is foundational to the story. when in reality, the war economy focused stuff is some of the strongest parts of his games. MGS where Hal goes on that long rant about nuclear proliferation was the moment i really signed onto this series. it is not often that new sci fi manages to talk about real world issues these days. MGS2 has this great moment when you are infiltrating a ship trying to find the metal gear and you come upon a roomful of soldiers & officers watching someone give a presentation on the metal gear. it is a sort of parody of power point/slide slow presentations for weapons systems, which is a real thing that goes on, only here, they are talking about giant robots. at one point he says "The only way to stop a bad guy with a metal gear, is a good guy with a metal gear." which felt eerily similar to pro-war and pro-gun propaganda.

similarly i read many articles and watched many reviews and deep dives into MGSV and not once did anyone cover the IRL conflict in which the game takes place, the initial Afghanistan proxy war between America and Russia. Kojima chose this setting both because it fit with his timeline and it signaled both the "end" of the Cold War and the continuation of global militaristic imperialism. it is odd, being an America citizen, to see this game, to see our forces over there fighting STILL, nearly 40 years later. The Phantom Pain has us rescue Kaz, who is working with the Mujihadeen, the way real US CIA agents were. the game world demonstrates this, with empty villages dotting the war-torn landscape, and propaganda billboards dotting the mountainside, demonstrating the collaboration between Western and Extremist Fundamentalist forces against the Soviets. it is a weird piece of geopolitical nostalgia, one that goes entirely un-commented upon, cos people have to crap on Konami or the game for being "unfinished "for the millionth time.
Don't waste your time with this, tbh. Some people are literally retarded and would equate MGS to stupid moments like Soldiers pissing on your character or some dumb shit.

I'd highly recommend you save your observations for August 24th ;) that's when you'll get a chance to speak about how truly brilliant the MGS saga is.
 

Psajdak

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Dec 20, 2018
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Yes creepy, I've always found a few of his games to be have a mildly creepy, eerie atmosphere, nothing major, but still something I've felt but have never seen mentioned by anyone else, is it just me?
No, there are articles, and some discussions to be found, precisely about horror elements in Kojima's games.

And not only were those from memorable moments such as Gray Fox slaughtering those soldiers, or Vamp, The Fear, or The Sorrow, not to mention design and sounds of B&Bs, or Skulls, etc...

No, because, you see, Kojima managed to produce very unique atmospere, found mostly in horror games, where player simply feels isolated, and alone.
For instance Shadow Moses from MGS1 is like military haunted house, and it has some locations without guards, and all you can hear is repeating music, or how in MGS2, outside, there is no music at all, just sunshine, and sounds of seagulls, but there is just something disturbing about it.

Music, or lack of it, ambient, cutscene direction, supernatural elements, 4th wall breaking, all of that in one way, or the other helps create eerie atmosphere in his games.

For me, it is one of the main reasons why I loved Kojima games for years now - yeah, I enjoy their gameplay, but what really brings me back to them is that I see them more as unique experience.
 
Jan 25, 2018
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Southeastern USA
Most PS1 games are pretty eerie.


Yeah, some of the stuff near the end is kinda creepy like the the codec convos.
This is true, a lot of PS1 games have an eerie vibe due to graphical limitations, even when they're clearly not meant to be horror games.

i find it interesting that nobody ever talks about the actual geopolitical stories in his games. everyone is always focused on the sci fi & fantasy elements, or just trashing the writing and plot outright, people ignore the military stuff that is foundational to the story. when in reality, the war economy focused stuff is some of the strongest parts of his games. MGS where Hal goes on that long rant about nuclear proliferation was the moment i really signed onto this series. it is not often that new sci fi manages to talk about real world issues these days. MGS2 has this great moment when you are infiltrating a ship trying to find the metal gear and you come upon a roomful of soldiers & officers watching someone give a presentation on the metal gear. it is a sort of parody of power point/slide slow presentations for weapons systems, which is a real thing that goes on, only here, they are talking about giant robots. at one point he says "The only way to stop a bad guy with a metal gear, is a good guy with a metal gear." which felt eerily similar to pro-war and pro-gun propaganda.

similarly i read many articles and watched many reviews and deep dives into MGSV and not once did anyone cover the IRL conflict in which the game takes place, the initial Afghanistan proxy war between America and Russia. Kojima chose this setting both because it fit with his timeline and it signaled both the "end" of the Cold War and the continuation of global militaristic imperialism. it is odd, being an America citizen, to see this game, to see our forces over there fighting STILL, nearly 40 years later. The Phantom Pain has us rescue Kaz, who is working with the Mujihadeen, the way real US CIA agents were. the game world demonstrates this, with empty villages dotting the war-torn landscape, and propaganda billboards dotting the mountainside, demonstrating the collaboration between Western and Extremist Fundamentalist forces against the Soviets. it is a weird piece of geopolitical nostalgia, one that goes entirely un-commented upon, cos people have to crap on Konami or the game for being "unfinished "for the millionth time.
He doesn't say "bad guy" and "good guy" but he does say "the only way to stop a Metal Gear is with another Metal Gear" which is still a pretty prescient line.

And yes, there's a lot of fascinating geopolitical subtext in the games that rarely gets mentioned.

No, there are articles, and some discussions to be found, precisely about horror elements in Kojima's games.

And not only were those from memorable moments such as Gray Fox slaughtering those soldiers, or Vamp, The Fear, or The Sorrow, not to mention design and sounds of B&Bs, or Skulls, etc...

No, because, you see, Kojima managed to produce very unique atmospere, found mostly in horror games, where player simply feels isolated, and alone.
For instance Shadow Moses from MGS1 is like military haunted house, and it has some locations without guards, and all you can hear is repeating music, or how in MGS2, outside, there is no music at all, just sunshine, and sounds of seagulls, but there is just something disturbing about it.

Music, or lack of it, ambient, cutscene direction, supernatural elements, 4th wall breaking, all of that in one way, or the other helps create eerie atmosphere in his games.

For me, it is one of the main reasons why I loved Kojima games for years now - yeah, I enjoy their gameplay, but what really brings me back to them is that I see them more as unique experience.
A "military haunted house" is the perfect way to describe Shadow Moses.

And yes, even Big Shell in the daytime managed to be eerie, I think it was simply the isolation of being way out in the middle of the ocean.