• Hey, guest user. Hope you're enjoying NeoGAF! Have you considered registering for an account? Come join us and add your take to the daily discourse.

Do you study the blade? Now you can study it harder

Rest

All these years later I still chuckle at what a fucking moron that guy is.
Headstamp Publishing will let you learn all there is to know about Japanese swords with

Swords of the Emperor: A Guide to the Identification of Imperial Japanese Swords, 1873–1945



Swords of the Emperor: A Guide to the Identification of Imperial Japanese Swords, 1873–1945 is a comprehensive reference work examining a little-studied period in the Japanese swordmaking tradition.

Japan is internationally renowned for its traditional swords, but comparatively little has been written about the swords of the Imperial period, which include both traditional, hand-made examples and modern, machine-made types. After Japan was ‘opened’ to the West in the 19th century, a period of rapid modernization saw the adoption of European-style military arms, uniforms, and accoutrements. This was also reflected in changes to military swords, which closely echoed Western designs—albeit with a Japanese twist—until a period of resurgent nationalism in the 1930s that continued through the Second World War. Swords of the Emperor follows the evolution of Japanese military, police, diplomatic, and court swords throughout this fascinating, complex period.​
At nearly 600 pages, Swords of the Emperor illustrates more than 220 swords by way of more than 2,000 original photographs, supplemented by archival material and original illustrations. In addition to those swords prescribed by uniform regulations for the armed services and civil service corps, the book also examines little-known examples, such as the 1873 Japanese Marine sword and the Gensuitō (Marshal’s sword) gifted to King George V in 1918. While the book is primarily intended as an identification and reference guide for collectors, curators, and researchers, enthusiasts will find much to enjoy in this beautiful, lavishly illustrated volume.​
John E. Plimpton is a prominent Japanese sword collector and retired antiques dealer. His Japanese sword collection is believed to have been the second-largest of its kind in the United States—until recently, John owned one of nearly every known type of Japanese sword officially issued from 1873 to 1945. A graduate of the University of Southern California, he served in the U.S. Navy for three years during the Vietnam War. Subsequently, John worked at the Petersen Automotive Museum and at the Martin B. Retting, Brass Rail, and Collector’s Armoury gun stores. John has been a member of the Nihon Bijutsu Tōken Hozon Kyōkai (NBTHK), Nanka Tōken Kai – Southern California Japanese Sword Society, the To-Ken Society of Great Britain, and The Japanese Sword Society of the United States (JSSUS). One of John’s hobbies is flying in Second World War fighter and bomber aircraft.​





Update: interview by the publisher


Discounted preorder for "Swords of the Emperor" still available: https://www.headstamppublishing.com/s... Nic Jenzen-Jones and Stephen Weese talk today about some of the background of Headstamp Publications' newest book, "SWORDS OF THE EMPEROR: A Guide to the Identification of Imperial Japanese Swords, 1873 – 1945". Nic and Stephen were both contributors and editors to the work.


Update 2: The publisher uses the book to identify his own sword

Reject Modernity; Embrace Tradition: The Type 95 Shin Gunto



"Swords of the Emperor" still available for discounted preorder - get your copy today!

https://www.headstamppublishing.com/s...

When Japan opened up to the outside world and began to industrialize in the late 1800s, it instituted major military reforms. In place of the samurai tradition, the new Japanese Imperial armed forces emulated the major European powers - France, Germany, and the United Kingdom. One element of this was the replacement of traditional swords with European styles for officers and civil officials.

These swords remained until the mid 1930s, when a wave of nationalist sentiment ran through Japanese society. In 1934, a new model of officer's sword was adopted, which took the style of a traditional katana. A similar (but less fancy) model was adopted in 1935 for non-commissioned officers. These were the Type 34 and Type 35 respectively, and they are some of the most common Japanese swords in the United States, as many were brought back as souvenirs by American soldiers.

Today we are looking at my Type 95, using Headstamp's upcoming book "Swords of the Emperor" as a guide.

Contact:
Forgotten Weapons
6281 N. Oracle 36270
Tucson, AZ 85740



Interview with the author:

 
Last edited:

Rest

All these years later I still chuckle at what a fucking moron that guy is.
Update: interview by the publisher


Discounted preorder for "Swords of the Emperor" still available: https://www.headstamppublishing.com/s... Nic Jenzen-Jones and Stephen Weese talk today about some of the background of Headstamp Publications' newest book, "SWORDS OF THE EMPEROR: A Guide to the Identification of Imperial Japanese Swords, 1873 – 1945". Nic and Stephen were both contributors and editors to the work.
 
Last edited:

Rest

All these years later I still chuckle at what a fucking moron that guy is.

They met in the dark of the night
For a final time, for the great showdown
Two dreamers deciding which path to take
One for their future, one for the present

I was standing strong until you showed your face
To ruin and ravage everything we've planned
Your dream is empty with its promise, your self fulfillment
The future holds so much more for us

One of us will die before this is over
One of us will die before this is over

The sword of vengeance glistens in the moonlight
Her words fall silent as he makes his attack
Now we will find out who truly holds the power
I'm waiting for you to relinquish your hold
There is no room for us so you must be destroyed
Then I'm afraid this is unavoidable

His blade plunges deep cutting down to the core
And with her last gasp for breath
All her dreams and aspirations fade
She pleads for him to see, to see, for him to see the truth

And with one final slice she's gone forever
No more dreams, no more tears, she's gone
And with one final slice she's gone forever
No more dreams, no more tears, she's gone

Bleed for nothing now, for no one hears your cries
Bleed for nothing now, for no one hears your cries
Bleed for nothing now, for no one hears your cries

He stands there victorious and alone
Suffering through what he himself has made
Without her, there is no point to my fight
He sees it all as it slowly begins to fade

One of us will die before this is over
One of us will die before this is over

He realizes now without her
Life loses point
Without the battle, without their struggle
Life loses point

He has no purpose now
Life loses point
As everything fades, everything fades
Life loses point

The struggle was keeping us both alive
The struggle was keeping us both alive
The struggle was keeping us both alive
The struggle was keeping us both alive
 

Rest

All these years later I still chuckle at what a fucking moron that guy is.
SinistralRifleman - Studying the Blade 2009

If you’re not yelling out your anime battle cry while wielding a Katana what are you even doing?​
Your weapon may be forgotten but the suffering of your defeated foes never shall be.​
 

Rest

All these years later I still chuckle at what a fucking moron that guy is.
Update 2: The publisher uses the book to identify his own sword

Reject Modernity; Embrace Tradition: The Type 95 Shin Gunto



"Swords of the Emperor" still available for discounted preorder - get your copy today!
When Japan opened up to the outside world and began to industrialize in the late 1800s, it instituted major military reforms. In place of the samurai tradition, the new Japanese Imperial armed forces emulated the major European powers - France, Germany, and the United Kingdom. One element of this was the replacement of traditional swords with European styles for officers and civil officials.
These swords remained until the mid 1930s, when a wave of nationalist sentiment ran through Japanese society. In 1934, a new model of officer's sword was adopted, which took the style of a traditional katana. A similar (but less fancy) model was adopted in 1935 for non-commissioned officers. These were the Type 34 and Type 35 respectively, and they are some of the most common Japanese swords in the United States, as many were brought back as souvenirs by American soldiers.
Today we are looking at my Type 95, using Headstamp's upcoming book "Swords of the Emperor" as a guide.
Contact:
Forgotten Weapons

6281 N. Oracle 36270
Tucson, AZ 85740
 
Last edited:

Rest

All these years later I still chuckle at what a fucking moron that guy is.
Update 2B:

The publisher demonstrates how to use a Japanese sword in a simulated combat environment

Type 94 Nambu [and Type 95 Shin Gunto] at the Backup Gun Match


 

BadBurger

Gold Member
Uh, since maybe someone in this thread is an expert: is there an online retailer who sells legit real-ass swords? Not replicas?
 

Rest

All these years later I still chuckle at what a fucking moron that guy is.
Uh, since maybe someone in this thread is an expert: is there an online retailer who sells legit real-ass swords? Not replicas?
 
Top Bottom