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Follow-up: Amber Guyger found guilty!

Kite

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So Joshua Brown was expected to testify in lawsuit against Guyger?

Yeah... They wanted to shut him up!

There is another theory out there that seems more likely than rogue cops.

Brown had been shot before
Brown had survived a shooting nearly a year before his death, Merritt said.
He was shot near a strip club in Dallas in November 2018, Merritt said. Nicholas Shaquan Diggs was killed in the shooting, Merritt told CNN by phone Sunday.
Both Brown and his family believed he was targeted in that shooting by someone he knew and had grown up with.
"And he was concerned that that person might try to come back and finish the job," Merritt said, adding that the shooter in that case hasn't been caught.
Brown moved out of South Side Flats about three months after Jean was killed in September 2018, according to Merritt. He tried to keep a "low profile intentionally until some of the heat from the shooting in November passed over," Merritt added.
 

DeafTourette

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Kite

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*shrug* A former friend who already tried to kill Brown once, his family was worried about this guy coming back to finish the job, Brown moved apartments and was laying low to avoid attention, but was thrust into the national spotlight because of Guyger and didn't want to testify because of the attention it'd bring.

Or dirty cops. Believe what you want, we'll see. Idgaf who is right but if I were a betting man I'm bet on the former friend being the murderer.
 

Corrik

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She ignored protocol, intended to kill him (her own admission), didn't render aid after she realized her mistake OR because that was SOP ... And you think manslaughter was more appropriate? I can see impairment but every action she took was deliberate.

No, murder was the correct charge.
She was not on duty do had no "protocol". She was tired after a double. All her actions point to accidentally going to the wrong apartment and it lining up with thinking it was hers. She shot while tired and impaired from being tired what she thought was a man in her apartment that broke into her apartment (the door was ajar). She gave limited CPR before panicking over the situation. She called 911 to report the accident, admitted she did it immediately, and began panicking over her job and the situation of being bewildered of not being in her own home.

Yes, I think manslaughter was more appropriate for the facts of the case. If they went murder, it would have had to of been a lesser sentencing, as we saw here.
 

DeafTourette

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She was not on duty do had no "protocol". She was tired after a double. All her actions point to accidentally going to the wrong apartment and it lining up with thinking it was hers. She shot while tired and impaired from being tired what she thought was a man in her apartment that broke into her apartment (the door was ajar). She gave limited CPR before panicking over the situation. She called 911 to report the accident, admitted she did it immediately, and began panicking over her job and the situation of being bewildered of not being in her own home.

Yes, I think manslaughter was more appropriate for the facts of the case. If they went murder, it would have had to of been a lesser sentencing, as we saw here.
Protocol would be to retreat to a barrier between you and the suspect, request backup, announce that you're the police and to surrender and inform them that backup is on the way. Doesn't matter if she was on duty or not... She still had to follow protocol since she was alone and thought there was a threat.

She admitted she intended to kill him. He was in a position of surrender when she shot him. He wasn't armed. Wasn't rushing her. He was a complete victim and she wasn't.

To paint this as an "accident" like the gun somehow went off without an intent to kill... When SHE admitted to it...

*Sigh*

Edit; barrier in this case would have been the door in the hallway of the building.

Double edit: she was still in uniform so she could have called immediately to request backup.
 
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Trojita

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https://www.cbsnews.com/news/joshua-brown-murder-dallas-police-identify-suspects-in-case-of-slain-amber-guyger-witness-2019-10-08/

Authorities are saying that the witnesses death was the result of a drug deal gone bad.

Jacquerious Mitchell told police it was Green who contacted Brown to buy the drugs, according to police. Mitchell said Green and Brown were talking when the conversation escalated into a physical confrontation. During the dispute, Brown shot Jacquerious Mitchell and Green shot Brown, killing him, according to Jacquerious Mitchell's account. Mitchell said he was driven to a hospital before the other two suspects fled.
 

DeafTourette

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Last edited:

Trojita

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DeafTourette DeafTourette You might be questioning this on the basis of thinking he was going for the purpose of buying for personal use. Based on what was found in his apartment, it's likely that he was making a deal for a very large order to sell afterwards.

You also would need to believe that Jacquerious Mitchell, the killer, is lying when he admitted to shooting him after allegedly being shot at by Brown.
 

DeafTourette

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How is a drug dealer MOVING that much weed and the cops/vice don't know it before he testifies in court?

Also, if it WAS known... The media would have crucified him and labeled him a non-credible witness. They can never pass up a chance to show an "unimportant" person's mug shot.

Quotations because he wasn't a high level politician.
 

Jenenser

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How is a drug dealer MOVING that much weed and the cops/vice don't know it before he testifies in court?

Also, if it WAS known... The media would have crucified him and labeled him a non-credible witness. They can never pass up a chance to show an "unimportant" person's mug shot.

Quotations because he wasn't a high level politician.
dude...
in a car...
little tipp, buying hughe quantitys from a illegal supplier nets you pretty cheap weed to sell if you have the connection. the driven amount doesnt really matter if you think about the money he makes for the small timeinvestment.

and no, you dont go to the cops and tell them that your a dealer/supplier...

it was known, but it was not important because a) he wasnt the one who died and b) she made the whole thing a clear case, you dont need to discredit a witniss, if the culprit made everything clear....

his instagram is filled with weed and stacks of money.

(and just so you know, i love weed and i dont think its a reason to discredit someone, that said... sometimes things are just what things are...
and this really seems like a drugdeal gone wrong or something personel... :/ )
 

DeafTourette

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is this a serious question?
I'm asking because wouldn't a snitch have told the cops about a drug dealer moving a lot of weed? Don't the cops have informants about drug dealers?

I honestly don't know how that stuff works but I'd assume they know about most drug dealers (who carry weight and not just a few grams here and there)...

Edit: I'm not going to die on this hill but I still feel it's suspicious. Especially since there were no eyewitnesses or anyone who grabbed the plate number in the previous articles.
 
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Jenenser

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I'm asking because wouldn't a snitch have told the cops about a drug dealer moving a lot of weed? Don't the cops have informants about drug dealers?

I honestly don't know how that stuff works but I'd assume they know about most drug dealers (who carry weight and not just a few grams here and there)...

Edit: I'm not going to die on this hill but I still feel it's suspicious. Especially since there were no eyewitnesses or anyone who grabbed the plate number in the previous articles.
if snitches would be that prevalent, the illegal marked wouldve died out years ago.

they don't. they might have leads on some, but its just a droplet of water on a hot stone. else something like this wouldnt be possible:
"The Organization of American States estimated that the revenue for cocaine sales in the U.S. was $34 billion in 2013. The Office of National Drug Control Policy estimates that $100 billion worth of illegal drugs were sold in the U.S. in 2013. "

you shouldn't. but in the current climate, i understand your distrust of the cops.
 

Corrik

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Protocol would be to retreat to a barrier between you and the suspect, request backup, announce that you're the police and to surrender and inform them that backup is on the way. Doesn't matter if she was on duty or not... She still had to follow protocol since she was alone and thought there was a threat.

She admitted she intended to kill him. He was in a position of surrender when she shot him. He wasn't armed. Wasn't rushing her. He was a complete victim and she wasn't.

To paint this as an "accident" like the gun somehow went off without an intent to kill... When SHE admitted to it...

*Sigh*

Edit; barrier in this case would have been the door in the hallway of the building.

Double edit: she was still in uniform so she could have called immediately to request backup.
Being in uniform doesn't mean she had a radio on her. She is in no obligation to follow a police protocol while off duty, and she likely panicked anyways and protocol was out the window.

Don't be one of those people sitting there behind a computer criticizing people because they don't always do the right thing or the smart thing in a scenario in which panic is involved. Panic affects everyone differently. It is easy to say why didn't that idiot jump out of the way of that speeding car instead of stand there while it hit them from your computer. However, everyone acts differently in those situations, and it can make even the smartest person seem dumb when analyzed.
 

monegames

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I'm asking because wouldn't a snitch have told the cops about a drug dealer moving a lot of weed? Don't the cops have informants about drug dealers?

I honestly don't know how that stuff works but I'd assume they know about most drug dealers (who carry weight and not just a few grams here and there)...

Edit: I'm not going to die on this hill but I still feel it's suspicious. Especially since there were no eyewitnesses or anyone who grabbed the plate number in the previous articles.
If they wanted him out of the picture, and they knew he was a legit dealer as in large quantities, it would be easier to just arrest him, or better get the feds to do it.

Sounds like they got the Mitchell guy because he was admitted to a hospital. Hospitals are required to report all gunshot victims, even apparent accidents, to the police.
 

DeafTourette

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Being in uniform doesn't mean she had a radio on her. She is in no obligation to follow a police protocol while off duty, and she likely panicked anyways and protocol was out the window.

Don't be one of those people sitting there behind a computer criticizing people because they don't always do the right thing or the smart thing in a scenario in which panic is involved. Panic affects everyone differently. It is easy to say why didn't that idiot jump out of the way of that speeding car instead of stand there while it hit them from your computer. However, everyone acts differently in those situations, and it can make even the smartest person seem dumb when analyzed.
She. Admitted. She. Intended. To. Kill. Him.
 

Jenenser

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Jul 30, 2013
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Being in uniform doesn't mean she had a radio on her. She is in no obligation to follow a police protocol while off duty, and she likely panicked anyways and protocol was out the window.

Don't be one of those people sitting there behind a computer criticizing people because they don't always do the right thing or the smart thing in a scenario in which panic is involved. Panic affects everyone differently. It is easy to say why didn't that idiot jump out of the way of that speeding car instead of stand there while it hit them from your computer. However, everyone acts differently in those situations, and it can make even the smartest person seem dumb when analyzed.
dude... she admittet the intend to kill. he was in a crouched position... this became a fucking execution.
murder is valid here. that was no manslaughter. and 10 years is quite a low sentence.

panic is no excuse for this. in theory this is person is trained for a situation like that, which makes your argument even worse.
 
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gunslikewhoa

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How is a drug dealer MOVING that much weed and the cops/vice don't know it before he testifies in court?

Also, if it WAS known... The media would have crucified him and labeled him a non-credible witness. They can never pass up a chance to show an "unimportant" person's mug shot.

Quotations because he wasn't a high level politician.
Eh...If the cops knew the drugs were there, they wouldn't be there anymore.

Also, "I witnessed a murder."
"Okay, sir. We'd like to hear your story but the law stipulates we do a thorough search of your property first."

$50 billion in illegal pot sales in the US each year. No, the cops do not know where all of the weed is.