Games Journalism! Wainwright/Florence/Tomb Raider/Eurogamer/Libel Threats/Doritos

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Margalis

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Ultimately, people seem to be demanding that EVERYONE suddenly reveal all this rampant corruption that supposedly exists, and, judging by some comments I've read in this thread, it appears that this corruption might be very Eurocentric (the GMAs are, yes?), and thus something that the American sites don't really have that much to say about.
This is what happened: Most outlets did not officially touch it while their writers went on Twitter and dismissed/mocked it.

This is what should have happened: A reasonable number of outlets officially weighed in, and on Twitter people agreed it was serious.

Look at Rock Paper Shotgun. A contributor wrote about the topic somewhat seriously on his personal blog, but RPS's only official response was to mock ethical concerns and trot out the tired "we at RPS all have superhuman wills and are never swayed by anything."

In the case of RPS they said they won't address the issue because they cover games and not games journalism - then they went ahead and DID address the issue, just to mock it.

Asking for more than that is not asking for too much.
 

JABEE

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This is what happened: Most outlets did not officially touch it while their writers went on Twitter and dismissed/mocked it.

This is what should have happened: A reasonable number of outlets officially weighed in, and on Twitter people agreed it was serious.

Look at Rock Paper Shotgun. A contributor wrote about the topic somewhat seriously on his personal blog, but RPS's only official response was to mock ethical concerns and trot out the tired "we at RPS all have superhuman wills and are never swayed by anything."

In the case of RPS they said they won't address the issue because they cover games and not games journalism - then they went ahead and DID address the issue, just to mock it.

Asking for more than that is not asking for too much.
RPS is also a partner of EuroGamer. How that affects there ability to cover this story was never disclosed.
 

Dr Dogg

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It seems to be more of a standard for games than films. PLENTY of movies get prescreenings.
To be fair there's a massive difference between being able to review a film and being able to review a game. A film is always going to be the same length no matter where, when or how you view it and the content will be the same for all the viewers in any circumstance where as the same can not be said for games. How one persona plays a game or even a difference in ability can greatly effect what the reviewer would see. Also the possibility of glitches and so on could easily further deliver various different experiences.

How many times have you read a review after you have played and finished a game that was bugged filled, lacking in depth and felt like the time you have just spent with it could have been better spent else where but one or numerous reviews hardly touch upon what you had just played? No mention of widespread bugs, No mention of terrible controls that don't work regardless of the subjective nature of them, from the content of the review felt like they only played a low percentage of it ect ect.

Over the last 20 years I have felt that reviews hardly serve the purpose of informing about a worthwhile purchase and more of an awareness drive. Reservations I would have are never touched upon and what I would consider to be a deal-breaker hardly ever mentioned.

RPS is also a partner of EuroGamer. How that affects there ability to cover this story was never disclosed.
I posted a link in another thread on here about Eurogamer orgainsing the ads for RPS. http://www.rockpapershotgun.com/2010/06/01/rps-announces-partnership-with-eurogamer/. Read into that what you will but I would like to think that they are not pursuing the story for personal reasons rather than not wanting to sully corporate ties.
 
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Clearly things are either black or white. Thanks fot the insight. You must have skipped my post about my ethical standards which seemed to go largely without comment except in this thread except for the person who wanted to double-check if maybe, somehow, even though we don't sell our swag, we were benefitting from a tax deduction by giving it to a charity.

As long as you keep fighting strawmen, it will feel like you're winning. But if you bother to notice that at least the Kotaku people in here are presenting something more complex than the image of being the pushovers for PR and tools of marketing that you think we are, you might wind up with some insights that are a little closer to reality.
I will pick you up on the ethical standards you outlined then.

I think it is a clear conflict of interest for you to go out to dinner with PR people who are in town.
 

Ledsen

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Update: Added Jason Schreier 15-21, Stephen Totilo 12-16, Nert's comment, John Walker on why RPS won't write about it, Rockstar's handling of GTA4, voodoopanda

Articles/videos
Wings over Sealand articles (second article has summary) 1 2
Rab Florence (the guy who started all this) criticizing games writing since 2008
John Walker's (Rock Paper Shotgun) blog (start with Games Journalists, And The Perception Of Corruption)
TotalBiscuit
Jim Sterling
Penny-Arcade
Gamasutra
Forbes
Worthplaying
GiantBomb
Old Gamasutra article on the influence of PR
Jason Lauritzen editorial and GAF post

Forum posts etc
Shawn Elliot - 1 (aegies is Arthur Gies of polygon.com) 2 3 4 5 6 on the psychology of PR etc
and some more Arthur Gies - 1 2 3 4 5 and some replies 1 2 3
Jeff Green on the way it actually works
ShockingAlberto on his view as a former games writer
Jason Schreier (Kotaku) - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
N'Gai Croal initial reaction on Twitter
Chris Schilling (freelance) likes both people involved and so doesn't want to write about it
Danny O'Dwyer (Gamespot UK) on why his site won't cover this (audience is not interested) - 1 2 3
Examples of various press kits
Letter sent to reviewers from UbiSoft along with their press copy of Assassin's Creed 3
The 3DS comes to GiantBomb
GillianSeed79 and firehawk12 on how journalist do criticize their peers
pastapadre on being shunned by the industry
An old episode of CGW Radio discussing Gerstmann-gate
Stephen Totilo (Kotaku) doesn't think this is an important story (has possibly changed his mind about that part, read post 9). Wants to focus on good games journalism, this prompted a pretty funny picture and a comment about it, then Stephen Totilo enters the thread 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
Weekend Confirmed 1 2
Syriel on his experiences of PR
Jeff Gerstmann short comment on swag
Snowden's Secret comments on gaming press reactions
Christian Donlan and Simon Parkin of Eurogamer want to change how they do things[/QUOTE]
Nert on his experience as PR in the tech industry 1 2
John Walker (RPS) on why the site won't cover it like his blog did
How Rockstar handled the reviews for GTA4
voodoopanda highlights that the issue is not in any way black or white
Zissou weighs in
 
Nov 29, 2007
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Why can't all people in this industry, or at least those who cover it, be as perceptive and as clever as Jeff Green? He calls a spade a spade EVERY TIME. Is that too much to ask of everyone else?
 

DCharlie

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Why can't all people in this industry, or at least those who cover it, be as perceptive and as clever as Jeff Green? He calls a spade a spade EVERY TIME. Is that too much to ask of everyone else?
Because Jeff is in a comfy place, the younger crowd are gasping for something more, for betterment, for some space to grow. Jeff is awesome as well.

I don't want this to sound like total criticism but here's part of the issue : Let's look at Movies : the thing is critical coverage of movies can lead to better things, critical coverage of games? There's not much career path options there - and the ones that are there are basically within the industry - either working in PR, "Social manager" or something akin to that.

Theres an underlying issue that the career path and the credibility of the industry as a whole : once we move from enthusiast blogger to Games Journalist - then we are at a dead stop : the top posts are likely gone, and the only other out is to expand into the industry and cozy to the people you deal with. There's seemingly conflicts of interest at almost EVERY turn with Games Journalism .

All in all, the industry is eating itself in terms of credibility: the conflicts of interest are running in several directions and it devalues the whole damned thing.
 

electristan

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What would you have done with the Halo 4 Xbox 360 that Microsoft might have mailed you and that your readers might have been curious to see in something other than officially-lit product shots? Privately smashed it with a hammer, coughed up the postage to send it back, or written an expose about the insidiousness of PR?
a bit late but if i was a journalist i would have let the PR company know long ago that i did not wish to be sent random PR material, state the same on my site so that the reader would know my stance on the matter and if thing were still being sent probably stock-pile them all and then one or a few times a year do a auction or something similar and give all the money earned to a charity.

PR can of course come and show the actual game or send over preview-code, screenshots and so forth just not big items that really don't do anything to help you guys cover the game content.

PR has many avenues to pimp the latest collectors editions or deluxe consoles.
 

Lancehead

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How many previews can you think of that are critical? In general previews are almost always nothing but praise. And it really doesn't make sense. That seems like a perfect time to tell developers what's wrong with a game sot hat it can be fixed while also warning gamers of potential faults.
This is one of the biggest problems. There's absolutely no reason not to criticise a preview for what it is showing. If you're an intelligent critic you can draw educated inferences and criticise them too. But the press mostly refrains from strong criticism because the game is not out yet.

There are no standards across the board because there is no "across the board." As Stephen mentioned earlier, bigger sites like Kotaku can afford to have very strict standards (and ethical standards are one of Kotaku's strongest points, in my opinion), but who's going to tell some college kid that he has to follow certain ethical standards for the volunteer site he writes for? And who gets to decide what those ethical standards are? I think accepting and keeping review copies is OK - what if some other reporter doesn't? Why should I let that reporter dictate how I do my job?
There should absolutely be an "across the board" ethics. If that affects "some college kid", then so be it. Setting a high standard for games journalism should be more important in your (and other journalists') thoughts.

What would you have done with the Halo 4 Xbox 360 that Microsoft might have mailed you and that your readers might have been curious to see in something other than officially-lit product shots? Privately smashed it with a hammer, coughed up the postage to send it back, or written an expose about the insidiousness of PR?
I would say you should have a policy in place to not accept things like that in the first place.

I'm curious, though, what message Microsoft sent you with the Halo 4 bundle. You've been saying "I've figured our readers would like to know what's inside", so I would assume Microsoft did not ask you to show it your readers.

Of course that's the obvious answer (and the one I'd most likely go with), but if you'll re-read voodoopanda's post, he brings up a different issue: what if you're doing a disservice to your readers by not warning them to stay away from a bad game?
That's not a disservice, that's really doing your job. I would not trust myself to not throw in at least a little undeserved praise somewhere reviewing that bad game.

But this also brings up another interesting question. The question you ask only become relevant if you're treating your review as a purchase recommendation, and not simply a criticism.
 
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Man, PR people must be like PR robots to half the people in these threads, always singlemindedly focused on the job of shilling products probably half of them don't really honestly care about that much. Not to crap on other more relevant arguments, of course.
To be honest that culture of not giving much of a crap about the games or gamers seems to filter through to a lot of games coverage.
 

Lancehead

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Speaking of preview criticisms, here are a few samples of how Old Man Murray did it.

I'm not asking for a similar tone of criticism, but criticism with less qualifications would be nice.
 

ClosingADoor

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PR has many avenues to pimp the latest collectors editions or deluxe consoles.
And then the website misses the pageviews, thus the ad money. And they are still there to make money. I can totally understand why such an article/video is published. It brings visitors, it is gaming related content and people want to see it.

Would you be happy with it if they showed it and then sent the console back (or gave it away to a reader)? That way, they still have the content, but aren't 'bribed' I think.
 

electristan

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And then the website misses the pageviews, thus the ad money. And they are still there to make money. I can totally understand why such an article/video is published. It brings visitors, it is gaming related content and people want to see it.

Would you be happy with it if they showed it and then sent the console back (or gave it away to a reader)? That way, they still have the content, but aren't 'bribed' I think.
I understand the part about page-views and ad revenue, I'm even "guilty" of watching an unboxing of a collectors edition (think it was the Fallout 3 one with the pip-boy clock) but it is not what i go to a news site to find. it makes more sense to me that that would be on a publishers page.

But if the hits and ad money are the main reason sending it back would be one way of helping the perception (though i remember reader that one reason this does not happen is the postage cost) and maybe mark that video as Sponsored since that is what it really is at the end of the day.
 

Oersted

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Another example occured to me: The new Need for Speed Most Wanted. Its lacking so much content, the technic is piss- poor etc. More here But it got cheering reviews from EDGE and Game Informer, almost everyone else is suffering from the review embargo. That smells fishy....
 
What if I'm good friends with a designer whose game I'm assigned to review? What if I'm close to an artist on a game but I can't stand the art? What if my review could have a palpable impact on a friend's livelihood? How could any of that NOT impact my honesty and the way I do my job?

These are great questions and there are no easy answers. And situations like this have indeed led to some ruined friendships, sadly enough.
Every time you review something, you could have a palpable impact on someone's livelihood. Does that mean you should just review everything positively so everyone is happy? Like someone else said before, get an impartial person to review it (those exist among game journalists, right?)


The issue can really be summed up with this cliche: don't bite the hand that feeds. PR people give benefits to gaming journalists they have positive relationships with. To fracture that relationship in any way could mean a loss of money for whatever publication the journalist works for, or worse case scenario, the loss of their job (Gertsmann). The entire point of a publication is to make money, and anything that results in a conflict against this goal is unsavory and should not be engaged. This is nothing new at all of course, but the pussyfooting game journalists are doing right now but completely ignoring this is laughable. The excuses are, to say it bluntly, pathetic. Totilo's hilarious beating around the bush about the relevancy of the issue to Kotaku, who runs articles including why living in Japan is awful, an edited image of a half-naked anime girl statue that will be revealed after the jump to get more clicks, and Xbox Live's confusion about movie stoners but someone being shunned from a publication because he had the gall to say that the fine line between journalism and PR is a major issue in the gaming industry is not worth talking about? Forbes, FORBES of all people, even commented on it. Should I check out Forbes or Kotaku for an Assassin's Creed III review?

Any publication that does not cover this story for fear of ramifications or because they don't want to hurt people's feelings, it's your right, but it's clear that you do not care about journalism, so don't pretend like making good games journalism is a priority in the least bit.
 

EternalGamer

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I don't know if Totilo and Schreier have given up on this thread but I hope they take away a couple of things:

1) there is a difference between those of us trying to engage them in conversation and the driveby cheapshots; I for example, sometimes try to use humor to make my point but I don't do it to just to "score points"


2) I think most of us recognize that the kinds of practices we are criticizing (occasional dinners, accepting PR kits, posting unboxing videos etc.) are standard industry practices. To you guys the fact that their standard industry practices probably makes it seem like they aren't problems. To us the fact that they are standard industry practices is part of the problem.
 

Jackpot

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I have been reading through this thread. And I think it's a shame how many people are so quick to jump to the "can't trust anyone" conclusion because of an issue that is extremely amorphous. Coming in here and saying something like "wow there are no journalists in gaming they're all marketers" or "welp can't trust any gaming website anymore" just seems so immature and misguided to me that it makes me want to ignore everything else you say. It'd be like me saying "welp can't trust anything GAF says anymore" because I dislike the way people behave in a few threads.
You're right, we can't extend it to all outlets and critics everywhere, but you and Totilo have given us multiple reasons in this thread as to why you have zero integrity.
 

QaaQer

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This is the elephant in the room and I believe one of the main reasons why the larger sites are avoiding commentating on the issue.

Pretty much it boils down to the fact that games sites are offering an opinion and little else of value.

But if you can't trust their opinions what use are they?

That's not an idea that owners of the websites want to be planting in their readers' minds...
nailed it.
 

ClosingADoor

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I understand the part about page-views and ad revenue, I'm even "guilty" of watching an unboxing of a collectors edition (think it was the Fallout 3 one with the pip-boy clock) but it is not what i go to a news site to find. it makes more sense to me that that would be on a publishers page.

But if the hits and ad money are the main reason sending it back would be one way of helping the perception (though i remember reader that one reason this does not happen is the postage cost) and maybe mark that video as Sponsored since that is what it really is at the end of the day.
Yeah, the cost of sending it back might be too high to justify it, don't know how much shipping costs in the US for stuff like this. A give away for all marketing material media receive at the end of the year might be the best I think, since a lot of fans and gamers would love to receive these things.

I think a lot of PR stuff like events, unboxings, etc, are in favour of the reader, the media outlet and the publisher. One gets the information he wants, the other the pageviews, the last the coverage. But the media needs to draw a line somewhere and be open about it. And maybe just have a better seperation between the people doing the 'fun stuff' like launchparties and the one doing the review for that game, so the perception of influence is at least kept to a minimum.
 

lednerg

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I wonder if there's a way to get Metacritic to re-evaluate who the real critics are as opposed to the entertainment reporters who moonlight as critics.
 

Mama Robotnik

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Is she seriously going to try and resume her career after these events?

Also, I am really, really surprised Eurogamer hasn't commented on things - they normally like to address controversies labelled at their site. EDGE has also been completely silent, I was expecting a scathing commentary by now.
 

QaaQer

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Just to be 100% clear I am not saying that PR people are horrible people, that they are conniving bastards trying to trick people, or that after a nice dinner with Totilo they go back the office and cackle over what a rube he is.
.
some are: http://www.corporatewatch.org/?lid=377 They are the ones who sold Gulf War I by hiring a 15 year old girl to lie to congress about Iraqis throwing babies out of incubators. PR people most definitely can be evil.
 

electristan

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Yeah, the cost of sending it back might be too high to justify it, don't know how much shipping costs in the US for stuff like this. A give away for all marketing material media receive at the end of the year might be the best I think, since a lot of fans and gamers would love to receive these things.

I think a lot of PR stuff like events, unboxings, etc, are in favour of the reader, the media outlet and the publisher. One gets the information he wants, the other the pageviews, the last the coverage. But the media needs to draw a line somewhere and be open about it. And maybe just have a better seperation between the people doing the 'fun stuff' like launchparties and the one doing the review for that game, so the perception of influence is at least kept to a minimum.
Exactly. The bolded is all I'm really looking for, and for it to be communicated well to both us the reader and PR, but most seem to think that they have it under control and there is no reason to do anything different.

This thread rally shows that what the press think about the situation and what the readers think are far apart and when call to answer and make a change most are not interested (not all of course).

I just don't understand why it is so hard for them to grasp.
 
Jan 4, 2009
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Is she seriously going to try and resume her career after these events?

Also, I am really, really surprised Eurogamer hasn't commented on things - they normally like to address controversies labelled at their site. EDGE has also been completely silent, I was expecting a scathing commentary by now.
After the recent Edge/Future Publishing twitter fun from Rich Stanton, they ain't gonna want to touch this with a bargepole.

@RichStanton said:
Edge gave GTA IV [10] but the review didn’t
@RichStanton said:
Future will do anything to accommodate advertisers.
 

ClosingADoor

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Exactly. The bolded is all I'm really looking for, and for it to be communicated well to both us the reader and PR, but most seem to think that they have it under control and there is no reason to do anything different.

This thread rally shows that what the press think about the situation and what the readers think are far apart and when call to answer and make a change most are not interested (not all of course).

I just don't understand why it is so hard for them to grasp.
I think it is because we as the press (me being part of it also, but not in the role of actual day to day journalism) deal with a lot of criticism on a daily basis. You always have angry people in the comments calling you out because of a certain review score or opinion you gave in a show. That's journalism, you have to deal with it, but it sometimes is hard to see the difference between an actual concerned audience and the people who are just yelling for no good reason.

But you need to have the discussion, it's only healthy to do so. I think every editorial team in gaming has heard about this by now and have had or are in the process of that discussion, public or not. Whether it leads to a change or not, is something to be seen of course.
 

Interfectum

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probably a little late but patrick's write up on giantbomb was pretty great. giantbomb is one of the only outlets I really do trust when it comes to games opinions/news.
 

Oxx

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Is she seriously going to try and resume her career after these events?

Also, I am really, really surprised Eurogamer hasn't commented on things - they normally like to address controversies labelled at their site. EDGE has also been completely silent, I was expecting a scathing commentary by now.
The same EDGE that won 'Best Games Magazine' at the Games Media Awards?

Don't rock the boat.

(Brought to you by: Xbox 360, Need For Speed Most Wanted, PlayStation, Wii U, Codemasters Racing, Metal Gear Rising Revengeance and NCsoft. Deep Silver has signed up as Media Transport Partner, Trion's Defiance is Pre-Drinks Party Host, Hitman Absolution is hosting the After Show Party and Nordic's Wii Sing 80s will present the popular rockaoke entertainment during the evening. Far Cry 3 is reception partner.

Meanwhile Gamescom and Indigo Pearl are event partners, with other sponsors including Green Man Gaming (Top Tweeter category), Precise (Coverage by a Mainstream Website), Sega (Games Writer of the Year), Onlive (Games Website) and THQ (Games Blog).
)
 

8bit

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I wonder if there's a way to get Metacritic to re-evaluate who the real critics are as opposed to the entertainment reporters who moonlight as critics.
You need a method of rating the critics, a sort of Metacriticcritic if you will.
 

I'm an expert

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So what we're saying is.. European journalists are way more corrupt than anywhere else. Right??
 

electristan

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I think it is because we as the press (me being part of it also, but not in the role of actual day to day journalism) deal with a lot of criticism on a daily basis. You always have angry people in the comments calling you out because of a certain review score or opinion you gave in a show. That's journalism, you have to deal with it, but it sometimes is hard to see the difference between an actual concerned audience and the people who are just yelling for no good reason.

But you need to have the discussion, it's only healthy to do so. I think every editorial team in gaming has heard about this by now and have had or are in the process of that discussion, public or not. Whether it leads to a change or not, is something to be seen of course.
Hope so to :) making it public might make it easier to hold people accountable but there is no way to force that.

Thanks for the input.
 

Shurs

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Garnett Lee had this to say in the Weekend Confirmed mega-thread:

I think I've done this a long time now; people have plenty of my record to see. It's no "cop-out" to say I'm not a journalist. It's a simple statement of fact. I don't investigate leads and report on events. I play games and then I give my opinion of them drawing from the experience of having similarly assessed hundreds of games.

I was going to write more but forget it. It only drags out the time spent by those of you who've chosen to hate everyone in the games media. Are there some in the media who get swayed more than others? Probably, I don't know. I'm not a psychologist. Do I get swayed? I try very hard to be true to myself, it's the one thing I have that everything else is derived from. That said, I imagine it's all but impossible not to have some psychologic effect from that exposure. At the same time, my survival motivation of needing to be honest and transparent is damn powerful motivation too.

I think that holds true for a lot of the members of the games media and when it doesn't, it's easy to tell.
 

El-Suave

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Another example occured to me: The new Need for Speed Most Wanted. Its lacking so much content, the technic is piss- poor etc. More here But it got cheering reviews from EDGE and Game Informer, almost everyone else is suffering from the review embargo. That smells fishy....
That might just be the case of different embargos for print and online outlets, because the German magazine I read has a review as well, and it's not a glowing one at all.
 

I'm an expert

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Garnett Lee had this to say in the Weekend Confirmed mega-thread:
Seems like the same old deflecting and not willing to admit that they're just as affected as any young, new "journalist" is. Hell, they're even more conditioned for being in the industry for so long. Look at some of the comments from other writers in this thread about PR's "role".
 
Jan 4, 2009
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So what we're saying is.. European journalists are way more corrupt than anywhere else. Right??
or European Journalists working in the US

Rev Stuart Campbell said:
We haven't even told you the story of how IGN's Colin Campbell, mentioned above and a winner of the GMA's "Games Industry Legend" award, is directly implicated in the practice of covertly selling review scores for advertising – something this writer can verify from first-hand personal knowledge.
 

Shinta

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Unboxing videos is a different conversation. I think they can be informative and helpful to readers who want to see what's inside the limited edition of a game. You might think they're just marketing videos. Maybe the truth is a mixture of both. Again, I don't know. And that's something that we should maybe be discussing more. But in the grand scheme of things, one Halo 4 unboxing video is relatively insignificant. And we certainly didn't publish that because we thought doing otherwise might cost us access or piss off a publisher.
I'm not losing any sleep over the unboxing videos. I actually like watching them for some things. But it is quite a bit murkier than many previously thought; because I think many just didn't take the time to actually think about it.

You and Totilo both took a stand against posting hashtags for marketers so you could enter a contest to possibly win a free PS3. But yet, you guys are okay getting a free special edition halo 360 to promote it for Microsoft. See the dilemma? It's basically like you guys not only joined the hashtag contest, but actually won the free system too.
 

Jubbly

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How many old tweets have been deleted?
None as far as I can tell. The 'thank you' to Eurogamer is still there, as are comments about her uni law module, and things like that.

I'm not losing any sleep over the unboxing videos. I actually like watching them for some things. But it is quite a bit murkier than many previously thought; because I think many just didn't take the time to actually think about it.
In some cases those unboxing things are actually quite useful to viewers. IGN were pretty enthusiastic about that ridiculously expensive Borderlands 2 loot chest, but most people who saw the video saw that it was a pile of overpriced crap and cancelled their pre-orders, or flipped the chests on ebay and bought a standard copy. Inadvertently, IGN provided a consumer service.

The Kotaku console is a different matter altogether as you're simply talking about an overpriced bundle. An X360 is an X360, regardless of the paint job, and everyone knows what it looks like and what it does.
 

I'm an expert

Formerly worldrevolution. The only reason I am nice to anyone else is to avoid being banned.
Nov 26, 2008
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Her "journalism" career is OVER. Potential employers tend to google applicants during the interview process, and she has left a huge digital paper trail of wrongdoings.
I have a feeling some European publication that is aligned with her "thoughts" on journalism will have a position for her.
 

Shinta

Banned
May 14, 2012
8,478
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In some cases those unboxing things are actually quite useful to viewers.
The journalists who won a free PS3 after that marketing contest could say they're using it to review games, so it benefits their readers. I'm just saying, if you draw a line on one but not the other, it really doesn't make much sense. They're almost exactly the same thing.
 

BowieZ

Banned
Jun 2, 2009
14,066
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www.youtube.com
Maybe we need a new website called METACREDIBLE.com where we rank gaming (and tv/movie/etc?) sites in terms of their journalistic integrity... and weight the scores those critics give along with those from well written posts of select credible fans (from NeoGAF, or others?).
 
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