Games Journalism! Wainwright/Florence/Tomb Raider/Eurogamer/Libel Threats/Doritos

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The Assassin's Creed 3 Press Kit salesman from E-bay is apparently Hardcore Gamer. And he/she even uses the review of AC3 to pimp his Ebay auction of the press kit (while also sounding like a mouth-drooling fanbo):



Credit to VibratingDonkey for posting it in the AC3 review thread.
Holy shit lol

Seems he deleted that line about the auction though. Even he realized he was going too far I suppose.
 
The Assassin's Creed 3 Press Kit salesman from E-bay is apparently Hardcore Gamer. And he/she even uses the review of AC3 to pimp his Ebay auction of the press kit (while also sounding like a mouth-drooling fanbo):



Credit to VibratingDonkey for posting it in the AC3 review thread.
Isnt there somebody here that posts under that user name? I might be mistaken on the name though, and if there is someone here under that name it might be a different person anyway.
 
The Assassin's Creed 3 Press Kit salesman from E-bay is apparently Hardcore Gamer. And he/she even uses the review of AC3 to pimp his/her Ebay auction of the press kit (while also sounding like a mouth-drooling fanboy):



Credit to VibratingDonkey for posting it in the AC3 review thread.

Hahaha, holy fucking shit. He doesn't even attempt to make it seem subtle, huh?
 
I'm not sure if any of the folks I was communicating with a bunch of pages back are still watching/reading/chatting. But I have a thought about something that you might do that could, over time, make a difference (if anything will).

Why not start a dedicated thread here on NeoGAF, to serve two purposes.

1. Publicly state your (ideally consensually arrived at) demands/standards/expectations. This document, or set of principles, could be directed at two different audiences/structures: the existing big-business/corporate games (pseudo-)media structure, and the inchoate grassroots alternative games press. In each case, you could explicitly detail what you believe is required for the legitimacy of entities within the given framework. You could list the kinds of hiring practices, disclosure and transparency practices, standards of professional and critical distance, absolute-no-go-zone principles, procedures of rectification (when there are missteps), and so forth, which you'd expect of a legitimate gaming media entity.

2. Catalog, case-study style, examples of entities/individuals which are, or are not, living up to the standards outlined in the document. When the policies you've provided are violated, you'd have a dedicated place to explain and discuss the problems. When sites or individuals do well, you'd have a place to explain and discuss those successes, too.

Over time, if this worked, the result would be a living and developing best-practices document, with case studies, for the games media.

Just a thought. And not a huge undertaking, frankly.
 
Assassin’s Creed III is one of those rare games conceived to be revolutionary from the beginning. Games like this only come around once in a generation. One of the most, if not the most, ambitious titles ever created. An inspiring testament to what can be accomplished with unbridled devotion, it’s possible that nothing of this magnitude will ever be attempted again. It’s a truly definitive event that will be looked-back as a crucial step in gaming evolution.
LOL hyperbole at its finest. Wow.
 
I'm not sure if any of the folks I was communicating with a bunch of pages back are still watching/reading/chatting. But I have a thought about something that you might do that could, over time, make a difference (if anything will).

Why not start a dedicated thread here on NeoGAF, to serve two purposes.

1. Publicly state your (ideally consensually arrived at) demands/standards/expectations. This document, or set of principles, could be directed at two different audiences/structures: the existing big-business/corporate games (pseudo-)media structure, and the inchoate grassroots alternative games press. In each case, you could explicitly detail what you believe is required for the legitimacy of entities within the given framework. You could list the kinds of hiring practices, disclosure and transparency practices, standards of professional and critical distance, absolute-no-go-zone principles, procedures of rectification (when there are missteps), and so forth, which you'd expect of a legitimate gaming media entity.

2. Catalog, case-study style, examples of entities/individuals which are, or are not, living up to the standards outlined in the document. When the policies you've provided are violated, you'd have a dedicated place to explain and discuss the problems. When sites or individuals do well, you'd have a place to explain and discuss those successes, too.

Over time, if this worked, the result would be a living and developing best-practices document, with case studies, for the games media.

Just a thought. And not a huge undertaking, frankly.
+1
 
The Assassin's Creed 3 Press Kit salesman from E-bay is apparently Hardcore Gamer. And he/she even uses the review of AC3 to pimp his/her Ebay auction of the press kit (while also sounding like a mouth-drooling fanboy):



Credit to VibratingDonkey for posting it in the AC3 review thread.
The flag description is priceless.
 
I'm not sure if any of the folks I was communicating with a bunch of pages back are still watching/reading/chatting. But I have a thought about something that you might do that could, over time, make a difference (if anything will).

Why not start a dedicated thread here on NeoGAF, to serve two purposes.

1. Publicly state your (ideally consensually arrived at) demands/standards/expectations. This document, or set of principles, could be directed at two different audiences/structures: the existing big-business/corporate games (pseudo-)media structure, and the inchoate grassroots alternative games press. In each case, you could explicitly detail what you believe is required for the legitimacy of entities within the given framework. You could list the kinds of hiring practices, disclosure and transparency practices, standards of professional and critical distance, absolute-no-go-zone principles, procedures of rectification (when there are missteps), and so forth, which you'd expect of a legitimate gaming media entity.

2. Catalog, case-study style, examples of entities/individuals which are, or are not, living up to the standards outlined in the document. When the policies you've provided are violated, you'd have a dedicated place to explain and discuss the problems. When sites or individuals do well, you'd have a place to explain and discuss those successes, too.

Over time, if this worked, the result would be a living and developing best-practices document, with case studies, for the games media.

Just a thought. And not a huge undertaking, frankly.
The first step would take some effort. And, even though I don't like to say this, I doubt we can get a group together to do all the research - especially for things like hiring practices.

But if we can get the framework done, I think the second step would be much easier to implement, and I imagine a lot of people would be enthusiastic about participating in that.
 
Step 1: Walk to the local Gamestop
Step 2: Buy game
Step 3: Write a proper, professional review and post it online with other reviews of games purchased the same way

Not sure where we went wrong in this process. Now we have people splitting hairs about conflict of interest vs individual personal integrity.

I don't like advocating throwing the baby out with the bathwater but the entire current gaming journalism culture needs to be nuked from orbit and started afresh.
As someone mentioned before, majority of gaming journalists get into the business in hopes of making it to the publisher's PR department.
 
So, this is from that other thread.
Guys, there's no controversy here. We decided to run a post, via EGM, that Pizza Hut was offering a prize to UK customers. Readers like to know when they can win free stuff, so we ran a post. There is no advertorial here since we weren't paid to put the piece up. Perhaps you didn't think the piece was newsworthy – well, that's fine. I encourage you to let us know at feedback@polygon.com and we'll use that feedback to influence our editorial direction.

What we won't allow is to have a bunch of people invade the comments and accuse us of wrongdoing. It's off-topic, and it's not helpful. If you want to believe there's a controversy behind everything, that's fine. We have a public ethics statement and we stick by it. If that's not enough for you to believe, then I'm sorry.

In short, we welcome your feedback, but in an appropriate venue. The comments thread of an article isn't that venue.
It's interesting that they seem to not have any idea "what the fuck is wrong you guys!?!" (paraphrase). Or are they being coy or something? Either they're trolling hard or they're desperately (and hilariously) out of touch with a large portion of their (future-ex) audience, as evidenced by the erased comments and (parts of the) posts in the other thread.
Not to mention out of touch with actual news.

I also like the bit about how they welcome comments, just not in the comments part of the article you'd want to comment about, cause that's not helpful.
Is this comedy?? Am I watching a weirdo video games "daily show" internet experiment?? The synchronicity of it all, it is uncanny.
 
So, this is from that other thread.

It's interesting that they seem to not have any idea "what the fuck is wrong you guys!?!" (paraphrase). Or are they being coy or something? Either they're trolling hard or they're desperately (and hilariously) out of touch with a large portion of their (future-ex) audience, as evidenced by the erased comments and (parts of the) posts in the other thread.
Not to mention out of touch with actual news.

I also like the bit about how they welcome comments, just not in the comments part of the article you'd want to comment about, cause that's not helpful.
Is this comedy?? Am I watching a weirdo video games "daily show" internet experiment?? The synchronicity of it all, it is uncanny.
They don't know what the fuck they are doing.

Panic! Damage control! Censorship!
 
I think PandoDaily(TechCrunch competitor) has the right model in terms of reporting press releases and other 'meat and potatoes' content. The main feed is completely original content/editorial/opinion and the side feed, PandoTicker is just links to other sites that are reporting all the standard news with maybe a paragraph or so of Pando news reporter comments if there is anything to add or opinion to the story.

I think this is the right approach to modern journalistic site(site that employs actual journalists). The main stories when you come to the site is all original that would not exist(at least in the same form) without the effort of the site and the smaller feed is enough to keep your reader informed about general state of industry.
Why waste all the effort on redundant work reporting same shit as everyone. Just concentrate on original content as a majority of stuff that people see when they come to your site.
 
So, this is from that other thread.

It's interesting that they seem to not have any idea "what the fuck is wrong you guys!?!" (paraphrase). Or are they being coy or something? Either they're trolling hard or they're desperately (and hilariously) out of touch with a large portion of their (future-ex) audience, as evidenced by the erased comments and (parts of the) posts in the other thread.
Not to mention out of touch with actual news.

I also like the bit about how they welcome comments, just not in the comments part of the article you'd want to comment about, cause that's not helpful.
Is this comedy?? Am I watching a weirdo video games "daily show" internet experiment?? The synchronicity of it all, it is uncanny.
"Please restrict your comments to your favourite choice of toppings and how awesome Halo 4 is."
Whats so unreasonable about that?
 
if parts of the gaming press actually end up being more responsible as a result of this controversy, that would be the best outcome. since a wholesale move in that direction seems like a long shot, my silver lining will be discovering how awesome rab florence is. i had seen that god hand review and a few other things of his but never made the connection that he is someone i should pay attention to until this. i started reading his eurogamer editorials and i like that this is the first thing he wrote for them.

My name is Robert Florence, and we are going to have a fight.

Not today. Today is a day for introductions and pleasantries and regrettable flirtations, but I felt it was only fair to warn you that somewhere down the line we are going to fall out. I will write terrible things in this body of text here, and you will write terrible things in the comments section below. You will pretend that you will never read my stupid column again, and I will pretend that I don't read your stupid comments anyway and that you can't hurt my feelings. We will make liars of each other. We will detest the very skin of each other.
http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2012-06-27-lost-humanity-1-fighting-talk

prescient
 
The Assassin's Creed 3 Press Kit salesman from E-bay is apparently Hardcore Gamer. And he/she even uses the review of AC3 to pimp his/her Ebay auction of the press kit (while also sounding like a mouth-drooling fanboy):


"Assassin’s Creed III is one of those rare games conceived to be revolutionary from the beginning. Games like this only come around once in a generation. One of the most, if not the most, ambitious titles ever created. An inspiring testament to what can be accomplished with unbridled devotion, it’s possible that nothing of this magnitude will ever be attempted again. It’s a truly definitive event that will be looked-back as a crucial step in gaming evolution.

It will blow you away. If you want to own a piece of the gaming event of the generation, check out my auction."
Credit to VibratingDonkey for posting it in the AC3 review thread.
Wow... he gave it 5 out of 5 in return of that $2000+ auction pimping. Great show, bloggers. Great show.
 
if parts of the gaming press actually end up being more responsible as a result of this controversy, that would be the best outcome. since a wholesale move in that direction seems like a long shot, my silver lining will be discovering how awesome rab florence is. i had seen that god hand review and a few other things of his but never made the connection that he is someone i should pay attention to until this. i started reading his eurogamer editorials and i like that this is the first thing he wrote for them.
t
i particularly like his piece about a fictional dark souls film which is a bonkers and hilarious way of explaining just why dark souls is so interesting and the very personal proteus one.
 
My search for Pizza Hut on Giant Bomb:

http://www.giantbomb.com/pizza-hut/95-2442/

Turned up the appopriate result:

"A restaurant that sells Pizza."


Although, apparently Halo 4 isn't listed under Pizza Hut games the way it should be.
You have the power to fix that.

Wait. Someone is auctioning off an AC3 press kit provided by Ubisoft? Have they said what they plan to do with the money?
Hookers and blow, man. Hookers. And Blow.
 
If this goes on much longer I predict we will start to see a massive backlash from games journalists worried that they will suffer permanent prestige loss.

I expect them to start talking about witch hunts, personal agendas and immature misogynistic manchildren. You know, deflection stuff.
 
i particularly like his piece about a fictional dark souls film which is a bonkers and hilarious way of explaining just why dark souls is so interesting and the very personal proteus one.
ill be honest, his love of dark souls (and god hand) are part of what makes me respect him. the other part is that he is funny, incisive, and critical.

according to wikipedia he also had this to say about lack of love:

Robert Florence of the Scottish web series Consolevania described the game was "effortlessly one of the best games on the Dreamcast" due to the number of ambitious ideas present and the unique concept that binds these ideas together
and no one who like love-de-lic games can be bad.

im reading through the rest of his stuff now, but i am really enjoying what i have read so far. hope he lands somewhere that allows him to keep writing about games.
 
If this goes on much longer I predict we will start to see a massive backlash from games journalist worried that they will suffer permanent prestige loss.

I expect them to start talking about witch hunts, personal agendas and immature misogynistic manchildren. You know, deflection stuff.


You forgot "entitled"

*shakes head*

C'mon...get up to speed.
 
Keith Stuart said:
It started when journalists attending this month's Games Media Awards were given the chance to win a PS3 by tweeting about a certain game and including its hashtag in their message. I didn't do it because I felt it was tantamount amount to a sponsored tweet, a form of advertising that the Guardian would not permit...


Oops. Somone gon get fired.
 
I wish it were. Who else out there gives a shit?

4chan? Anyone else?
What's the word over in SA?

Edit: did they un-erase the comments? It shows 23 comments right now on my end. The fuck is this mess... Is it still ok to feel nausea over PR posing as news now that comments are uncensored!!? HNGNHNHNGNGHNGH!!!?!
 
Why do you think so many sites are busy giving excuses for why this isn't really newsworthy?

They don't want people to give a shit.

"Can't we just go back to business as usual, guys? We got a good thing going on here."
This. They want it to just disappear, we have to make sure it doesn't get swept under the rug.
 
I am really glad this thread exists.

This kind of stuff exists in other business and media-related stuff too but just because it exists there doesn't mean gamers have to put up with it.

Hopefully this thread will actually change some people's reading habits and others' reporting habits.

In my experience it's tough sometimes as a writer on a blog/site/whatever b/c often times you're paid very little (paid per post or have a post requirement) and then there is a pre-approved list of "stories" or topics you can write about. Often times these "stories" are just links to PR releases or better yet, other sites' "articles" about that PR release. The writer doesn't really care about the story and has very little incentive to write something better than "passable" for that post. They do the bare minimum required to have that post "count" as a post and move on.

So from that perspective it might be easy to let the writer off the hook b/c they're "just doing their job" and the real "bad guys" are the people running the site and/or editors. But I don't think that is right. These "writers" need to stand up for better quality and integrity too, just like the readers need to demand better quality.

The problem, however, is that there are so many people that want to crack into this "business" that many writers feel/are easily replaced by someone that "plays ball." And because creating a site and getting a following isn't all that hard, the same can be said for websites. If one site stops playing ball, another will spring up to take its place.

This "business" needs to be changed from the top down, down up, inside out, and outside in if real lasting change is going to take place.

But like I said, this problem is not isolated to gaming sites. I used to live in San Diego and now San Diego's newspaper is basically just a mouthpiece for propaganda but it still is represented as "news." Here is a NY Times piece about that for those interested:
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/11/b...bune-open-about-its-pro-business-motives.html

This post is already too long but screw it, right?

I was offerred a free trip across the country to cover a major video-game company presentation. I am not sure why representatives from this company contacted me and offered me the trip, etc, but it happened. They said they liked things I had posted about games and whatever before...so yeah...whatever.

I ACCEPTED THE TRIP. I was given no guidelines for what the company wanted from me or why they were sending me to this presentation. It wasn't like I was hired to cover the event by the company and sent there to write things for the company's site or told to tweet positive things, etc. Look, I'll be the first to admit, I'd be willing to do that but I'd make it VERY clear that is exactly what I was doing when I was doing those things. You would never see a tweet or something from me that was disguised as one thing when it was really another.

This trip, that wasn't the case. I wasn't hired by anyone to cover anything. I was told the company was familiar with past things I had done at similar events. They sent me there. The story goes...

I flew across the country, a car service picked me up from the airport, took me to the event, and I was provided food, etc. During the presentation at the event I started doing what I have always done at those types of events, tweeting my honest impressions and feelings along with some fashion updates on what people were wearing (b/c that cracks me up).

Then during the hands-on portion of the event I received a call from someone at PR saying essentially that they had read my tweets and then reminding me who paid for my trip. I was then told to meet a PR rep at the event where I would meet a company rep who would "work with me for the remainder of the event to make sure I was having the most enjoyable time possible and had all of my questions answered." I was babysat. I was so pissed about the whole experience.

I shot a bunch of video about the whole thing on my phone while there, as it was happening, my thoughts, etc. I decided not to really do anything with it b/c this business, like any business, is small and I didn't want to burn any bridges with "raw" "in the moment" emotions.

But the more I see stuff like this going on, the more I know we all need to stand up for everything we believe in, even if one of those things is just how games are covered, or whatever.

Dang. Sorry if this was long and didn't make sense.
 
I am really glad this thread exists.

This kind of stuff exists in other business and media-related stuff too but just because it exists there doesn't mean gamers have to put up with it.

Hopefully this thread will actually change some people's reading habits and others' reporting habits.

In my experience it's tough sometimes as a writer on a blog/site/whatever b/c often times you're paid very little (paid per post or have a post requirement) and then there is a pre-approved list of "stories" or topics you can write about. Often times these "stories" are just links to PR releases or better yet, other sites' "articles" about that PR release. The writer doesn't really care about the story and has very little incentive to write something better than "passable" for that post. They do the bare minimum required to have that post "count" as a post and move on.

So from that perspective it might be easy to let the writer off the hook b/c they're "just doing their job" and the real "bad guys" are the people running the site and/or editors. But I don't think that is right. These "writers" need to stand up for better quality and integrity too, just like the readers need to demand better quality.

The problem, however, is that there are so many people that want to crack into this "business" that many writers feel/are easily replaced by someone that "plays ball." And because creating a site and getting a following isn't all that hard, the same can be said for websites. If one site stops playing ball, another will spring up to take its place.

This "business" needs to be changed from the top down, down up, inside out, and outside in if real lasting change is going to take place.

But like I said, this problem is not isolated to gaming sites. I used to live in San Diego and now San Diego's newspaper is basically just a mouthpiece for propaganda but it still is represented as "news." Here is a NY Times piece about that for those interested:
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/11/b...bune-open-about-its-pro-business-motives.html

This post is already too long but screw it, right?

I was offerred a free trip across the country to cover a major video-game company presentation. I am not sure why representatives from this company contacted me and offered me the trip, etc, but it happened. They said they liked things I had posted about games and whatever before...so yeah...whatever.

I ACCEPTED THE TRIP. I was given no guidelines for what the company wanted from me or why they were sending me to this presentation. It wasn't like I was hired to cover the event by the company and sent there to write things for the company's site or told to tweet positive things, etc. Look, I'll be the first to admit, I'd be willing to do that but I'd make it VERY clear that is exactly what I was doing when I was doing those things. You would never see a tweet or something from me that was disguised as one thing when it was really another.

This trip, that wasn't the case. I wasn't hired by anyone to cover anything. I was told the company was familiar with past things I had done at similar events. They sent me there. The story goes...

I flew across the country, a car service picked me up from the airport, took me to the event, and I was provided food, etc. During the presentation at the event I started doing what I have always done at those types of events, tweeting my honest impressions and feelings along with some fashion updates on what people were wearing (b/c that cracks me up).

Then during the hands-on portion of the event I received a call from someone at PR saying essentially that they had read my tweets and then reminding me who paid for my trip. I was then told to meet a PR rep at the event where I would meet a company rep who would "work with me for the remainder of the event to make sure I was having the most enjoyable time possible and had all of my questions answered." I was babysat. I was so pissed about the whole experience.

I shot a bunch of video about the whole thing on my phone while there, as it was happening, my thoughts, etc. I decided not to really do anything with it b/c this business, like any business, is small and I didn't want to burn any bridges with "raw" "in the moment" emotions.

But the more I see stuff like this going on, the more I know we all need to stand up for everything we believe in, even if one of those things is just how games are covered, or whatever.

Dang. Sorry if this was long and didn't make sense.
A refreshingly honest look into the average week of a game journalist.
 
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