GVMERS - The Rise and Fall of Dead Rising

IbizaPocholo

NeoGAFs Kent Brockman

Few video game villains are as versatile as zombies. The number of settings that they can appear in are unlimited. The range of powers and attributes that they can possess are vast. And because they lack a pulse, the ramifications of killing them are nonexistent. When Nathan Drake murders hundreds of mercenaries in Uncharted, one can’t help but wonder whether he is truly a good person. But when Leon Kennedy does the same to the undead in Resident Evil, there’s no question as to Leon’s righteousness.

The only major downside to zombies is that because of this versatility, there are no shortage of games that feature them – and because there are no shortage of games that feature them, their presence alone is rarely enough to make whatever they’re part of feel special. Few games from the mid-2000s were more acutely aware of this than Dead Rising. The brainchild of Capcom’s Keiji Inafune, Dead Rising cast players in the role of Frank West, a photojournalist-turned-vigilante who tasks himself with discovering the scoop of a lifetime in a zombie-infested shopping mall. While many players picked it up because of this premise alone, most stayed with it when they discovered that underneath laid a challenging, yet deeply rewarding gameplay experience; one that exacerbated the danger of its zombies with a stringent time limit, and an unforgiving save system.

When the dust around its release settled, the industry had crowned it one of the most unique takes on the genre, and a solid demonstration of how the seventh console generation would be able to take the medium to new heights. Yet Capcom was dissatisfied. It felt that Dead Rising could have been better had it leaned more deeply into its Western design elements, and that its development team had been unable to do so because it was almost entirely Japanese. As a result, the company would enlist Vancouver-based developer Blue Castle Games to take over the series in its stead – a decision that helped improve it in the short term, yet stripped it of everything that made it unique in the long term.

This is the rise and fall of Dead Rising.
 

TwiztidElf

Member
Dead Rising is a classic. It's in my personal top ten GOAT list.
2 and 3 are acceptable good games.
I don't acknowledge any other Dead Rising games.
Another dead franchise.
 
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First game is an amazing, timeless classic. Such an ambitious idea and running on the 360 of all things, I must thank Inafune for secretly having Capcom staff develop the Dead Rising and Lost Planet IPs back then.

Second game was a bit too on the nose with what it was doing but still good. OTR was a shameless cash grab with some changes but still acceptable. Never played 3 or 4. I wanted to play and I bought 4 for cheap when my brother left his Xbox One with me but never got around to it. Didn't even research into what they changed but fucking hell.

RIP Dead Rising, I loved Frank West but he did get overly shilled back in the 360/PS3 gen but now I miss it.
 

kunonabi

Member
Dead Rising was such a breath of fresh air after Resident Evil kind of tossed zombies aside and started reveling in bad sci-fi melodrama instead. Naturally, Capcom screwed it all up in record time and both franchises are a lost cause now.
 
First one was great because till then we didnt see that many characters on one screen, really showed off the power of then next gen console. But I still didnt like the time limit and those arcade machine mechanics.
 

kiphalfton

Member
It was special, due to the number of zombies on screen, being able to use anything as a weapon, and essentially being able to play out a Dawn of the Dead scenario.

The game went way to over board with the stupid characters though.
 

StreetsofBeige

Gold Member
They shouldn‘t even have made a second one. The first one was quite unique and didn‘t need a sequel.
DR 1 probably sold great. So just like everything in life...... make another and double up the sales.

I dabbled with the demo on Xbox One (DR 3?). Wasn't feeling it. Felt too clunky and 30 fps-ish. Not sure it even hit that.
 

SlimeGooGoo

Party Gooper
Fun fact

Dead Rising 1 uses some animations from Shadow of Rome. They're also similar in some regards, probably both use the same engine.

We need Shadow of Rome 2
 
DR 1 probably sold great. So just like everything in life...... make another and double up the sales.

I dabbled with the demo on Xbox One (DR 3?). Wasn't feeling it. Felt too clunky and 30 fps-ish. Not sure it even hit that.
Yeah, I know. But it was quite obvious it's not gonna have the same impact. DR1 worked great because the area was rather small and it had high re-playability due to the time limit. I'm usually not a fan of this but DR is one of the few games where I actually enjoyed the time limit. Having to choose whether you want to save everyone or follow the story was a great idea but it only worked because the area was so small. It was so obvious that everything would fall apart if you make it all bigger. But alas... Therefore I think it's no crime the series is dead. It should have been so already after the first.
 
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Soodanim

Member
I only played 2 and OTR. Having not played 1, OTR felt like them saying "Here's how a more direct sequel would have looked" and I find it was a better game because of it. Less of the time constraints, more of the gameplay without limits.

Despite enjoying both of them, I stayed well away from sequels. Pre-release content had me suspicious, post-release confirmed them as worth avoiding.

I wonder if we will get a "Back to basics" DR at some point.
 

Redlancet

Banned
Dead Rising was such a breath of fresh air after Resident Evil kind of tossed zombies aside and started reveling in bad sci-fi melodrama instead. Naturally, Capcom screwed it all up in record time and both franchises are a lost cause now.
A lot of problems of the demise of dead rising its on Microsoft shoulders
 

Hunnybun

Banned
I remember finding the original Dead Rising REALLY difficult. It's one of the few games I've liked and wanted to play through that I've given up on because of difficulty.

I'm not sure if I was doing something wrong or what, but I just couldn't progress. I seem to remember the second boss killing me about 30 times before I finally beat him. I just gave up after that.
 
I liked the first one, it was one of the releases that played a part in making the early years of 360 great imo. After that it started to feel a bit monotonous, 3&4 were ok I guess but nothing special.

I can see a remake or spiritual successor later this coming generation being made however I prefer Capcom moved on or revitalised older IPs like Dino Crisis, Final Fight and Ghouls & Ghosts
 
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