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Home-style cooking with OnkelC and Friends, Vol.2

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OnkelC

Hail to the Chef
Jun 17, 2006
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Working Index, WooHoo!

Westfalian Birthday Party dishes (Potato salad, bean salad, Schnitzel and stuff)

Cajun Roast with mashed potatoes (by ChryZ)

Swiss Cheese fondue

Gingered Thai Rice Salad and Barbecue Chicken in Kaffir Lime Leaves (by Scrow)

Nachos for 7 (by catfish)

Kedgeree (by bovo)

Kimchi Fried Rice (by bluemax)

Dak Gouchujang Bokum & Mando (by ChryZ)

Pasta, Beef and Zucchini casserole (ingredients)

Scrambled Eggs (ingredients)

Chinese Honey Garlic Pork (by ChryZ)

Pasta with Chicken Breast sauce (by NinSoX)

Autumnish dinner with guests (Salad, foccaccia and orange cream)

Pasta "Aglio e Olio"

Tofu Schnitzel with potato salad (by bovo)

"Bratkartoffeln" (aka Panfries)

Macaroni Cheese

Tuned Tomato Soup and tuned Ramen (by AlanHemberger)

Tortilla attempt (ingredients)

Spicy Lentil soup (by bovo)

Cauliflower Polish style

Salmon Wellington (by ChryZ)

Hamburger BBQ

TACO TIME! (by Funky Papa)

Marble Cake with glaze

Convenience Monday (Bratwurst, Peas and Mash)

Gourmet Omelette (by ChryZ)

Chicken Chow Mein

"Abendessen" (german dinner table)

Quiche_Deluxe! (by onion_pixy)

Fruity Workday Bolognese

Sake Teryaki Tonburi (by ChryZ)

Simple 15 Series: The Pizza for one! (by The Take Out Bandit)

German cheesecake

Pork Roast with Dark Beer Gravy (Leftover usage)

Enchilladas De Pollo, Frijolles Con Chipotle, Arroz Verde and Guacamole (by ChryZ)

Simple 15 Minute: The Pancake and chocolate chip (by The Take Out Bandit)

Chicken and Rice improvisation (by dachande and roommates)

30 Minute Veggie Dish

Haemul Pajeon (by ChryZ)

Halloweenish Pork Fillet

"Basterdized" Raclette

Bachelors' Mac and Cheese (by gprime)

Tagliatelle with Salmon

Japanese Curry (by ChryZ)

Albóndigas (by ChryZ)

Redfish with mustard sauce and parsley potatoes

Cincinatti Chili Recipe (by Wraith)

Grünkohl

Sweet and Sour Chicken (by elostyle)

Club Sandwich

Daeji Bulgogi (by ChryZ)

Semi-Homemade Pizza (by bovo)

MincemeatSchrooms

Moussaka (by ChryZ)

Beef Stew

Pesto (by bovo)

Spätzle'n'Salad

Steak Tartare

Toast Hawaii

Chicken and Broccoli casserole (by holliberry)

Arepas Grandes (by ronito)

Some Kind of Stir fry Noodles with random Ingredients (by bovo)

Beef Burgundy (by heavy liquid)

Genuine Pizza (by heavy liquid)

pasta and broccoli (by jarosh)

Mile-High Apple Pie (by heavy liquid)

Kalgukzu (by ChryZ)

Königsberger Klopse

Random Carbohydrate intake

Sickbay food

Loco Moco (by ChryZ)

Weisswurst

Gourmet Sandwich (by ChryZ)

diverse degenerations

Thanksgiving plate (by BlueTsunami)

Bolognese a la procrastinata

Buldak (Korean fire chicken) (by ChryZ)

You-aint-nothing-but-a Hot Dog and Lasagna Double Feature

Roast Duck

November Barbecue

Full English Breakfast

The Convenience strikes back

Dak Galbi (by ChryZ)

Best cookies in the World! (by cloudwalking) (Recipe)

English Christmas Market impressions (by bovo)

Mole Poblano de Pollo, Arroz Rojo, Frijoles Refritos (by ChryZ)

Penne, mushroom and spinach casserole (by holliberry)

Chocolate cake

Shepherds pie (by heavy liquid)

Awesome Paella (by PedYup)

Slow cooked baby back pork ribs (by smirkrevenge)

Fisherman's Stew (by heavy liquid)

ChryZ does various awesome dishes

Chocolate Chip Banana Bread Muffins (by ChryZ)

Mexican-Style Pork Stew (by heavy liquid)

African Groundnut Stew (by ChryZ)

True Home-Style cooking reincarnated by beelzebozo

Cornballer does ChryZ
s chicken mole


ChryZ moles, too

German Christmas Market impressions

Jambalaya (by ChryZ)

Christmas candy (by beelzebozo)

Beavertowns first, a Breakfast casserole



Volume 1 can be found here
 

OnkelC

Hail to the Chef
Jun 17, 2006
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Cooking is fun, fun is cooking!
Welcome to Volume 2 of the humble cooking thread on NeoGAF and let us continue with the cooking from all over the world. Make this one even bigger, badder and better than the first! :lol

I‘ll start with a jewel from the archives:
Traditional Westfalian Birthday party for the mother-in-law

One thing I try to avoid and steer clear of by all means (and you should do so, too!) are traditional Westfalian birthday celebrations. They can be categorized in two sub-types: for the elderly and for the youth.
The birthday parties for the elderly usually sport the following characteristics;
* big audience (40-200 people) in a restaurant or barn,
* starts at lunch or coffee time and lasts till well after midnight,
*LOADS of foods, beverages and dishes, one is forced to consume unhealthy amounts of cake and frankfurters,
*stupid ass „Volksmusik“ (German pendant to kitschy Burt Bacharach and/or country music)
*stupid ass games and sing-alongs with the hosts, initiated by single „caring“ guests,
*kids are forced to perform with an instrument, sing some birthday song or recite a shitty handmade „poem“ in „honor“ of the host.

Birthday celebrations for the youth are basically the same, except the music is a bit more contemporary.

Since the parents-in-law have an abundant amount of relatives and they actually appreciate the celebration described above, the wife and I decided (as every year) to help out with preparation and service while at it. As a bonus, yours truly can store himself away in the kitchen while the celebration and do some stuff for you to enjoy, too.

We planned with around 30 to 40 guests which were supposed to arrive between 11.00am and to stay till 5.00pm. The following dishes were planned for the celebration:
-“Schnittchen“ (German cannapees)
-Bohnensalat and Kartoffelsalat (green bean salad and potato salad traditional German style)
-Party-Schnitzel (Wiener style Schnitzels with mushrooms)
-“Kaffee und Kuchen“ (traditional German afternoon coffee table)
- Drinks and beverages.

The day before birthday started with the preparation of the bean and potato salads. Base for the green bean salads are cooked green beans and onions:




The dressing consists of a neutral to nut-tasting oil and vinegar mixed with lemon juice, salt and pepper. Mix them with a blender or hand mixer:





spread the dressing over the bean/onion mix and stir it:



let it rest overnight.

Next, the potato salad with homemade mayonnaise-in-law.

Potato salad is a common german side dish to anything meat and sausage. There are several preparations possible, ranging from being served cold with mayonnaise as the main carrier of taste to prepared warm with a vinaigrette and roasted bacon cubes. The former goes great with barbecue, Schnitzel or fried fish, the latter is a worthy company to more premium pieces of meat and fish, as the original Wiener Schnitzel made from Veal or a to nice piece of tenderloin, for example. The mother-in-law chose the cold served variant with mayonnaise, which is best prepared the day before serving so it can intensify its taste overnight. As a twist, she made the mayonnaise for the salad herself.

Base, as with every mayonnaise are egg yolks (use only the freshest eggs you can get hold of, as they are used raw), vinegar, oil, mustard, salt and pepper.

Cook the desired amount of potatoes with the peel still on. Wash and clean off the peels from dirt before cooking. Add some salt to the cooking water.



When the potatoes are ready cooked, they should be peeled while still hot to ease the peeling process.
PRO-TIP:
Use the following trick to prevent your fingers getting burned over the peeling process:
Lure the mother-in-law into watching some daily soap and have her peel the cooked potatoes while doing so!
The result should look like this:


Cut the potatoes in not too thin slices and let them cool off in the big ass bowl you will serve the salad in the next day.


Next, cube one to two onions and wash the cubes over with boiling water to remove the peak hotness and add them to the potatoes. Mix them lightly.





Mayonnaise is next. First, separate the yolks from the egg-white, put the yolks in a high bowl, add some salt, pepper and mustard:






Stir the mix and slowly add some oil until the mass gets solid:


With normal mayonnaise, one would continue to add oil until the mass gets creamy again, but the mother-in-law used condensed milk (one small can) instead of oil to „lighten up the mayonnaise“ a little bit:


Next, add some vinegar until the desired consistency is achieved:


Add salt and/or pepper until the mayonnaise gets an intensive taste (mind the potatoes!). Mix the mayonnaise with the (hand-warm) potatoes, repeat and let it also rest over night.


The next morning was Cannapee preparation time (imagine the plates pictured below times 4):




Schnitzels arrived from a catering service, the parents-in-law wanted it this way (pictured amount times 3):

And, for no one shall starve to death, some cakes and sweets for coffe time:


I hop you enjoyed this little excursion into the Westfalian outback.

Tonights dish will be a genuine homemade Swiss cheese fondue. Stay tuned and contribute your stuff! :lol
 

ChryZ

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Jun 21, 2004
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YAY, new cooking thread! Let's break it in.

Cajun Roast
(with mash and broccoli)

roast ingredients

2 KG pork shoulder (4.4 LBS)
2 CUP pureed tomato sauce
4-5 X carrots
4-5 X celery stalks
4-5 X onions (sliced)
4-5 X garlic clovers (halfed)
4-5 TBSP spice mix (check below)
1 TBSP brown sugar
1 TBSP butter
3 TBSP oil

sides ingredients

1 X broccoli
8 X potato
3-5 TBSP milk
1 TBSP butter
1 TSP nutmeg

spice mix

2 parts onion powder
2 parts garlic powder
2 parts dried oregano leaves
2 parts dried sweet basil
1 parts dried thyme leaves
1 parts black pepper
1 parts white pepper
1 parts cayenne pepper
1 parts celery seed
5 parts sweet paprika

meet the meat



spoon some spice mix over the meet and start rubbing, store in the fridge over night



the next day, all the dry spice transformed into a moist spice coating



prep the celery stalks, garlic cloves, carrots and onions (save some) ... pre-heat oven at 150C/290F



heat cast iron pot, add oil+butter then gently roast onions and garlic



add the roast and seal the meat by lightly browning it



remove the prep'd meat and make a bed of carrots, celery stalks and onions,
fill the pot with enough beer to cover the veggies



return meat to pot



cover pot and place it in the pre-heated oven



after 30min



after 60min (check out the shrinkage)



after 90min (even more shrinkage, nicely browned, onions caramelized)



almost done, lower the heat a little and remove the cover, let the roast dry a bit



in the meantime peel potatoes and chop'em up



bring to boil and simmer until soft



discard water, lower heat, add butter, milk, salt, pepper and nutmeg



mash until smooth, add milk if it's too lumpy



time to check out the finished roast



remove the meat from the pot and let it rest under tin foil,
remove the carrots and celery and chop'em up,
heat steamer and add broccoli, set timer to 5-7min



heat the pot and remaining broth on the stove, add pureed tomato sauce and
another spoon of the spice mix, season with salt, pepper and brown sugar,
then add the chopped carrots and celery



slice the roast



nice and juicy



serve roast slices with sauce, mash and steamed broccoli




enjoy
 

Jacobi

Banned
Jun 11, 2004
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Yeah, second volume ! Man does that look tasty... I'm jealous.

@potato salad : Too much stuff in there !!!!!!!! ;)
 

Zaptruder

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Jun 7, 2004
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Just wondering... why start a second volume?

One giant thread for prosterity is good no?
 

OnkelC

Hail to the Chef
Jun 17, 2006
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ChryZ: NICE! You have switched continents, didn't you?:lol

Zaptruder said:
Just wondering... why start a second volume?

One giant thread for prosterity is good no?
I thought a second volume would be nice since the first one became a bit bloated. I am still working on the index for the first one.

If you could go without the index, It would be no problem to continue in the original thread. I like the Idea of a giant thread, too.

Opinions on this, please!

continue with volume one or continue in volume two?
 

Christopher

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Mar 19, 2005
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Continue with Volume Two, just have a link to volume one as a reference. It was about time you made Vol 2.
 
Jun 9, 2004
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Your green beans remind me of this stuff my mother used to cook, probably super unhealthy - but delicious as all hell because it was so buttery. Green beans, onions, and bacon.

Now I'm all hungry. :(
 

Triumph

Banned
Jun 7, 2004
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That potato salad looks so yummy... but why ruin it with the onions? :(

Next time I make it, I promise to post instructions with pics on how to make Professor van Benderschlotten's Patented Bruschetta and Pasta Sauce. It's mmm mmm good.
 

OnkelC

Hail to the Chef
Jun 17, 2006
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So, let's cook like it was 1975:lol .
The "Käsefondue" (swiss cheese fondue) is one of the dishes I remember from my childhood. Although widely ignored by contemporary cooks, it is a good dish for lower temperatures and rainy days, as it makes your tummy warm and comfy, like a couch in front of a fireplace from inside.

Preparation is simple and fast, from the first picture to the first piece of bread dipped the whole thing took less than 40 minutes.

These are the ingredients for tonights dish:

Dry or medium dry white wine
various cheeses, I went with (from left to right) Emmental, Appenzeller, Gruyere and Austrian Mountain cheese,
garlic,
corn starch,
"Kirsch",
some paprika powder (not pictured)
crispy bread.

This dish can be prepared for a random number of persons. The ingredients per person are 200-250 grams of cheese, half a garlic clove and 300 millilitres of white wine. The choice of cheeses can be made after your own preferences. For a true (and cheap) taste sensation, you can ask for the leftover cheese pieces at the counter and mix away.

However, there are some mandatory special utensils needed for the preparation of this dish: a earthenware or stoneware pot (cacquelon) for the preparation, a small burner for serving (can be substituted with a teapot warmer) and some forks with a long handle. We got a set like this as a present, but I call stuff like this "Stander arounder" aka stuff that one uses once or twice a year and for the rest of the time it collects dust:


As said, preparation is dead simple. Grind the cheeses, mix them in a bowl and cube the garlic clove:




Put the earthenware pot on the stove, add the garlic, pour the wine in it and heat it until it starts to steam:



While the wine heats up, mix some starch with the "Kirsch" and keep it at hand:





When steam starts to rise from the pot, add a handful of cheese to it and stir in a "8" shape. Do not stop stirring from this point until serving, as the fondue is prone to scorching like no other dish I know. When the cheese is molten, add the next handful of cheese, stir it in and so on until all of the cheese is done. Over the whole time, the dish should only boil lightly, if it starts bubbling violently, reduce the heat a bit. It took me about five repeats until all of the cheese was added. DO NOT FORGET TO STIR!:lol :





Finish Line:
When all the cheese is in the pot, the cheese will rest at the bottom with a good amount of wine on the top. To blend them completely add a part of the starch/Kirsch mix, keep on with the stirring and let it boil once. If the fondue is still too thin, add another bit of the starch mix, let it boil and so on until the fondue has a rich, creamy texture to it. Finish it off with some paprika powder (mostly to enhance the color, you can go without it):



Put the burner in place, light it up and put the pot on it. Cut the bread in small pieces and serve alongside the fondue.



DONE!
Be prepared for a long and funny evening of fondue. There is a multitude of drinking games possible for the poor blokes or gals who lose their piece of bread in the fondue:




Guten Appetit! from Bonn.

Feedback, comments and contributions are always welcome.

As a contribution to my job, I will have to leave for Berlin tomorrow and return on tuesday evening, so no dish from me until wednesday. Keep this baby alive by keeping it coming!:lol
 

OnkelC

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Johan van Benderschlotten said:
That potato salad looks so yummy... but why ruin it with the onions? :(

Next time I make it, I promise to post instructions with pics on how to make Professor van Benderschlotten's Patented Bruschetta and Pasta Sauce. It's mmm mmm good.
Sir, your contribution would be appreciated.
 

B'z-chan

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Jun 7, 2004
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I'm gonna be making some Arrabiata sauce for my pasta bake so i'll probably contribute that when i get around to making it.

Question: anyone made blackened chicken yet? Or bourbon chicken?
 

RevenantKioku

PEINS PEINS PEINS PEINS PEINS PEINS PEINS PEINS PEINS PEINS PEINS PEINS oh god i am drowning in them
Jun 6, 2004
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Johan van Benderschlotten said:
That potato salad looks so yummy... but why ruin it with the onions? :(
'cause that's how you make it so damn good!
My mother (a fine German woman) taught me how to make potato salad, pretty much the same way. Only difference is adding in celery, which adds a nice texture to it.
 

OnkelC

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Uh Oh, the discussion about Onions or non-Onions for potato salad is a religious one. Both variants are accepted. The use of slightly boiled-over onions is a good compromise imo.

So, I'll have to leave until tuesday now. As a little plead for your cooperation, I would like you to post/PM any free or affordable Wordpress 2.0 themes you come across that are savvy for a cooking related blog. If you know what I mean. :D
 

ten5ive9ine

They've got me haunting a family in Texas.
Sep 26, 2006
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These threads are great. I used Vol.1 for making dinner last night.
 

Hooker

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Jun 6, 2004
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I'd advise against using a different website/blog for this. I know I won't visit it as often anymore, and I can assure you many people will think/do the same.


I'm going to my sis' again today (every Sunday actually :D) I'll try to fix some pictures ^^.
 

Scrow

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Jun 6, 2004
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Okay I figured it was time for me to jump on the bandwagon. Before I get started however I want to make it clear that it is not me who is cooking. My mother is the chef and my father is the apprentice kitchen hand.

In this entry I've got two reciepes. First up will be Gingered Thai Rice Salad followed by Barbecue Chicken in Kaffir Lime Leaves.

Gingered Thai Rice Salad

This fabulously fragrant salad is refreshing and very easy to make. While there seems to be a lot of ingredients, the salad is actually very quick and easy to make. For a complete main course, I like to sear a thick fillet of white fish for each person, glazed in sweet chilli sauce and finished in the oven before it is perched on top of a mound of the rice salad.

INGREDIENTS
2 cups long grain rice
5 spring onions, finely chopped on the diagonal
3 medium carrots, coarsely grated
4 baby bok choy, washed and chopped
2 kaffir lime leaves
1/2 cup coarsely chopped coriander
1 1/2 cups chopped roasted peanuts
1 tablespoon black sesame seeds
2 tablespoons finely chopped Thail basil

Dressing
2 tablespoons vegetable or peanut oil
juice of 2 limes (about 3 tablespoons)
3 tablespoons Thai fish sauce
2 tablespoons palm sugar
2 tablespoons sweet chilli sauce
1 tablespoon miced ginger
pinch of chilli powder or cayenne pepper
sald and pepper to taste

METHOD

First, cook the rice: bring a large pot of salted water to the boil then add the rice and simmer for 8-10 minutes or until tender. Drain and rinse thoroughly in cold water then drain again.


After letting the rice drain spread it evenly on a tray and allow to air-dry and come to room tempreture.

Meanwhile, make the dressing. Whisk together the oil, lime juice, fish sauce, palm sugar, sweet chilli sauce, ginger, chilli powder and salt and pepper and allow to sit until the rice is ready.


Mmmm, little green orbs of TASTE.


Chopped them into halves and squeeze the juice out of them.


And combine everything else together for the dressing.

Prepare all the vegetables then mix thoroughly with the finely sliced lime leaves, coriander, chopped roasted peanuts and sesame seeds, Add the cooked rice and mix well.


For those who have never seen it before, the vegetable in this pic is called bok choy.


Chop it up.


Put it aside.


And here's the bunch of coriander.


Pluck the leaves from the stalk.


And throw it into a salad spinner along with the chopped bok choy.


Give it a bath in clean water and then spin dry.


Don't forget to grate the carrot!


Pluck the lime leaves from the stalks.


Sharpening the knife is important for the next step.


Because you want to chop the leaves extremely fine and don't want to bruise them with a blunt knife.

Toss the rice and vegetable mixture with the dressing, tossing thoroughly to coat all the ingredients with the dressing then add the Thai basil.


The only way to properly toss a salad is to do it with your hands, so get into it.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

With the salad done it is time to celebrate by opening a bottle of wine before we start on the next part of this meal.


Usually with this sort of meal you'd have a white wine. Unfortunately we didn't have any white wine chilled, so we settled on the next best thing. Of all the varieties of red wine pinot noir is probably the best compromise to accompany a meal such as this.

Barbecue Chicken in Kaffir Lime Leaves

INGREDIENTS
10 bamboo skewers
400g chicken thigh fillets, chopped into cubes
1 teaspoon vegetable oil
1 tablespoon galangal, finely chopped
1 tablespoon lemon grass, finely chopped
1 tablespoon garlic, finely chopped
2 teaspoons chilli, finely chopped
1 green onion, finely chopped
1/2 teaspoon Chinese five-spice
1 tablespoon fish sauce
2 teaspoons brown sugar
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon black pepper
40 kaffir lime leaves (about two packets)
lime wedges, to serve

METHOD
Soak skewers in cold water for at least 15 minutes.

Marinate chicken in oil, galangal, lemon grass, garlic, chilli, green onion, five-spice, fish sauce, brown sugar, salt, pepper and 5 lime leaves, finely chopped.


Here's a portion of the meat after marinating, before it gets skewered.

Let stand for 15 minutes or for several hours.

Preheat barbecue or grill pan to a medium-high heat.

Skewer chicken cubes between whole lime leaves, placing four pieces on each skewer.


Be sure to pack it fairly tight.


Ready to take outside to the BBQ.

Cook chicken skewers on barbecue, turning every 2 minutes until done.


BBQ time! Excellent... this is the part of the meal where I come in. I'm resident BBQ boy so all BBQ duties fall to me. I wrestled that title from my father years ago, and rightfully so.

Try to place the skewers such that the base of the skewer, where you'd hold it isn't exposed to intense hit, otherwise your area of grip will burn and break off.


Cook the other side, and continue to turn until cooked through. Don't worry if the leaves burn and turn black, it adds to the flavour somewhat.


A couple of skewers lost their handles despite my best efforts. This is why it's important to soak the skewers in water beforehand. The kebabs also should've been lightly coated with oil to prevent the meat from sticking.


It wasn't too bad in the end anyway.

Serve with lime wedges.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

With all the parts of the meal finished it's time to serve it up.


Mmmm, ready to eat!


But first top up your glasses. Cheers!


With our bellies full and the wine starting to take the desired effect it's time to sit back, relax and watch the rest of Australian Idol.
 

Scrow

Still Tagged Accordingly
Jun 6, 2004
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Hooker said:
I'd advise against using a different website/blog for this. I know I won't visit it as often anymore, and I can assure you many people will think/do the same.
My thinking was that the site would be good for those people who aren't GAFers. Hopefully people will find their way here through OnkelC's site.
 
D

Deleted member 1235

Unconfirmed Member
OnkelC said:
Opinions on this, please!

continue with volume one or continue in volume two?
i think the first thread should be archived and the new thread is a good idea.

We are cooking nachos for 7 tonight, I'll try take some pictures. Ingredients cost 27euro....

for 7
4x nacho chips
3x tomato "blokjes" (diced tomatos, tinned)
2x tinned corn
3x chilli beans
4x chicken fillet (roughly 600gram)
3x Creme fraiche (sour cream but creamier sorta)
3x onions (quite small red ones)
3x garlic clove
3x avocado
2x chilli mix powder
1x choppd red chillis (shop had no fresh ones, so got a jar)
1x big block of gouda cheese
I like to prepare all the ingredients first, so lay them out in bowls. If you cooking for lots of people then you put it all in bowls, lay those out and everybody makes their own plate when the mix is ready.

-Put the tomatoes and beans in 1 bowl after draining them (otherwise soggy chips 4 U)
-cut up the chicken into blocks
-cut up the onions and garlic
-smash up the 3 avocados and whip them with a fork, the more whipping the creamier it gets, add 1 lemons worth of juice and a bit of salt and pepper.
- put everything else into bowls (sour cream, grated cheese etc etc)

like so


also neat trick with the avocado, if you make it early, going brown is a worry, however, if you retain the stone and pop it on top it doesn't go brown!



pretty cool

anyway, with all your prepped ingredients, pop the onions and garlic in a big pot with oil and brown them a bit.

Then throw in the chicken and continue browning.


heat the oven up as well for the chips later.

maybe drain the meat if the chicken gives off quite a bit of liquid, then once its nice and brown, add the tomatoes and beans from your big bowl.

Then dump in the corn and the chilli mix (we ended up using 1 bag not 2) as well as the chillis (IMO the hotter the better!)

Let that get up to almost a boil and then simmer, keep stirring everynow and then to stop from burning at the bottom.



while that is doing that, lay out the corn chips on a tray for popping in the oven



put them in when the nacho mix is near ready, it's near ready when it's thickened and nice and hot, if it's too runny, you can spoon some excess off. Just keep tasting it to see if it's good yet, nachos definately aren't rocket science.

once the chips are ready, it's time to eat, chips take around 3 minutes in the oven, so pop them in right at the end of the cook up.

Once its done, put them all on the table with a ladle for the meat and have your guests go nuts, here's a sample of the finished dish.



It's great for many people because afterwards the words "uunnnghhh I'm soo full" were heard repeately. Everyone eats with their hands as well, which I believe makes the eating experience more intimate and social.
 

OnkelC

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Guten Abend from an Internet Cafe in the small town of Berlin!:lol

Concerning the Blog I am planning to set up: No one needs to be afraid that my cooking in here will stop anytime soon. The only reason I would stop posting my culinary adventures on this board would be a decline in interest. But every second reply I get from people who have visited this thread is "Why don't you make a blog from this?", so a try is a try. I will never forget that "ze whole thing" started here and the feedback so far was, measured not only by NeoGAF standards, encouraging for me to go on. Consider the Blog as an offspring of the cooking that goes on here.

So be pepared for more cooking stuff from the humble kitchen on NeoGAF. But now to the new contender:

Scrow:
Welcome aboard and thank you for the BBQing goodness! :lol Greetings to the elders for those fine dishes. BBQed chicken with rice salad is a gorgeous combination.

thanks to ten5ive9ine for your feedback. What was cooking then?

I had a fix of Burger King tonight, as I tend to stick to the known and proven stuff when on duty. I miss my kitchen.

Keep yours coming for the world to see (and to cheer me up a bit)!
 

Scrow

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OnkelC said:
Scrow:
Welcome aboard and thank you for the BBQing goodness! :lol Greetings to the elders for those fine dishes. BBQed chicken with rice salad is a gorgeous combination.
being an australian i couldn't think of a more appropriate first reciepe than something cooked on the BBQ. no shrimps i'm afraid though. :)
 

bovo

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Thought I would continue my habit of posting old fashioned dishes, so decided to make something that I haven't eaten for years. It's Kedgeree, an anglo-indian dish popular with the Victorians. It was usually (always?) eaten for breakfast, but I made it as a evening meal...

As usual, it's not quite standard, as the recipe has been run through a vegetarian filter. Instead of flaked smoked fish, I have used smoked Tofu, which I've never used before - but it ended up quite similar to how I remember it (although less fishy obviously).

Ingredients: The aforementioned smoked tofu, eggs, basmati rice, an onion, fresh parsley, butter, and turmeric and cumin for colour and flavour.


To make it easier, I cooked the rice and the eggs earlier. The rice is just boiled (no pictures of that) - and the eggs were hard-boiled. Thought I would include a picture of a kitchen gadget that I fully expect no one else in the world would think necessary. It's a device for poking holes in the bottom of eggs so that the shells don't crack when you put them in boiling water. Anyone else use one?


The tofu is sliced to a size resembling flakes of fish, the hard-boiled eggs and onion are chopped, and the parsley is also chopped (kitchen tool number two - a mezzaluna for chopping herbs)


Melt a good sized amount of butter in a pan. (You can see pre cooked rice behind - forgot to mention that you should rinse the rice in cold water after boiling)


Add the onions and cook for a few minutes.


Add the smoked tofu (or flaked fish) and some turmeric and cumin. You could/should use non-powdered-in-a-jar spices, but these are easier to get hold of...


Add the rice and heat through for some more minutes.


Add the chopped hard boiled eggs, and the parsley towards the end of cooking. Don't stir too much as the eggs will fall apart.


When you're happy that everything is cooked through, transfer to a bowl and you're done.
 
D

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bump, I updated with some Nachos for 7 mmm mmm!
 

bluemax

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Time for something a bit simpler!

Actually most of my recipes are gonna be fairly simple as I'm a somewhat poor (Albeit steadily employed) college kid. First up is Kim Chi Fried rice. I stole the idea from a local place, but it's not too hard to make on your own.

Ingredients:
Meat (you can get it at the place with beef, or chicken I think, for this one I'm using a porkchop because I didn't want to use chicken)
Rice (depends upon how many people you're serving and your rice cooker, I went with one cup)
Kim Chi (variable amount really)
1 Egg

Here we go:

I started by defrosting 1 porkchop. Normally when I've done this I used a chickenbreast but tonight I went with pork for a little variety. You could also do some korean style beef strips.



Next up I started a pot of rice. My rice cooker takes about 20 minutes for 1 cup of rice. And yes I know it's dirty.


There are a number of ways you could go about cooking the meat. For simplicities sake I'm going to grill it in the George Foreman, because George Foremans are awesome!


One problem I do have with the George Foreman is that the middle of meat never gets cooked as quickly as the outside (At least on semi frozen stuff), thankfully since we're gonna be frying this up having it a little underdone at this point is ok.


Next up, chop the meat into bit size pieces!


One fairly standard non stick frying pan:


Add rice to pan.


Next up add the meat to the rice, and then add some cooking oil. I'm using Canola oil because that's what was cheap at Costco. Your prefence may vary. I have no guideline on how much oil to use, but don't over do it obviously.


Oily! At this point I turn the heat on and start the frying.



This is what I have to work with, isn't college awesome!


Kim Chi, or spicy pickled cabbage is best when freshly dug up from someones yard. I of course living in an apartment and being busy with school do not have time for this. Nor do I have time to even go to K-Town and buy something a bit more authentic. So this is what I found at Costco. It's passable enough.


Add the desired amount of Kim Chi and mix in, continue to fry until you're satisfied with the consistency of the mix. Remove from heat and place on a plate for serving.


The place I go for Korean food serves all of it with a fried egg on top. I don't know why, but it tastes pretty good so I do it too. This particular egg got a bit messy, but oh well.


The finished product! Yummy! And it only took about 30 minutes or so to prepare (including time for the rice to cook).



I've got two more recipes coming, but no time to write them up at present. Let me know what you think though!

Edit, ok um I guess I can't link from Picasa Web Albums. Anyone got suggestions a free host with plenty of storage space, that's easy to mass upload too?

For now you can find the pics here:
http://picasaweb.google.com/matthew.barney/KimChiFriedRice
 

ChryZ

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bluemax said:
First up is Kim Chi Fried rice.
Yum! Kimchi Fried Rice is great.

You caused a serious craving for korean food here.

I had to help myself ...

Dak Gochujang Bokum & Mandu
(chicken in hot chili sauce panfried with potstickers)

For the record this is a south korean dish. F*ck the north! V(^.^)V

main ingredients:

1 X whole chicken breasts (2 halves)
1 X ginger (thumb-sized)
3 X garlic cloves (mushed)
3 X ice lettuce leaf (optional)
3 X green onions (sliced)
1 CUPS chicken stock
2 TBSP soy sauce
1 TBSP sugar
2 TBSP gochujang
2 TBSP chili flakes
2 TBSP roasted sesame
1 TBSP seasame oil (from roasted sesame)

sidedish ingredients:

5 X mandu (store bought)
1/2 CUP water
2 TBSP soy sauce
1 TBSP rice wine vinegar
1 TSP chopped green onion

slice the chicken and marinate with the sugar for at least 30 min



add gochujang, soy sauce, chili flakes and seasame oil,
then prep garlic, ginger and the chicken stock



heat pan and simmer chicken stock, grate ginger and garlic into it



add marinated chicken and let it bubble away on medium heat



evaporate nearly all the liquid, almost no need to stir



in the meantime grab some mandus from the freezer



place in small pan and crank up the heat to high, the frozen mandus will defrost a little



add some water to the heated pan, the liquid should start to steam right away



cover the pan and steam them, this will take only a few moments



when all the liquid evaporated, deglaze the pan with another small sip of water,
it will help to give the mandus some color and it will loose 'em up, no need to
cover this time



serve the chicken on a bed of ice lettuce topped with some roasted sesame
... and the potsticker with some soysauce+vinegar for dipping




It's especially tasty to fiddle some chicken into a lettuce leaf and to eat it as a mini wrapper.

Enjoy.
 

OnkelC

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As a starter, this is the diet I had while in Berlin:



BUT ENOUGH OF ZAT!

Tonights dish is a casserole with pasta, beef and zucchini. The ingredients are:


-Half a pound of ground beef,
-half a pound of pasta,
-one medium zucchini,
-6 to 8 slices of bacon,
-one onion,
-half a pack of tomato puree,
-one bunch of parsley,
-two balls of mozzarella and some grated parmesan or grana padano,
-some cream cheese, salt and pepper (not pictured)

Cooking starts in around an hour, pics will be up at the usual time. Stay tuned.
 

Cornballer

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This thread always makes me hungry....

I'm cooking the Tofu & Pork w/ Black Bean sauce tonight, courtesty of Vol. 1. Hope it turns out well. I had a fun time in the local chinese supermarket yesterday gathering ingredients. :)
 

OnkelC

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So, let's cook.
The following casserole was a brainchild of the slow day in the office today, so no further explanation on the origins of this dish.

First, cut an onion in half. Cube one half and cut the other half in slices:


Mix about half of the onion cubes with the ground beef and add some salt and pepper. Yoou can add any additional herb if desired. I wanted to add an autumnal note to the taste, so I added some marjorie and thyme to it. Mix it well, then make a longish loaf from it, cut it in slices and make meatballs from them:



Let them rest for a few minutes. In the meantime, put a large pot with salted water on the stove and get it boiling. Heat a large skillet without oil or fat to max and roast the bacon strips until they are light brown, then dry them on a kitchen paper(?):



Fry the meatballs in the same skillet and let them take some color. Then add the onions and fry them alongside until they get glassy:




In the meantime, cut the zucchini to slices and put them into the skillet. Roast them for about 5 minutes:



The water for the noodles should be boiling by now. Add the pasta and cook them according to the package instructions. Preheat the oven to 190-200 degrees celsius.

Add the tomato puree as well as about two tablespoons of cream cheese to the skillet and let it cook on low heat for 5-10 minutes:



While everything is boiling, cut the mozzarella balls in thick slices and chop the parsley:


When the noodles are done, splash them with cold water to cool them down:


Get an oven pan, add about half of the noodles, then add all of the meatball/zucchini sauce and about half of the chopped parsley, then top it off with the rest of the noodles:





Add the remaining parsley, then decorate the casserole with the bacon strips, mozzarella slices and a bit of parmesan or grana padano (adds more taste to the cheese crust that will develop):




Finish Line:
Put the casserole in the hot oven and let it roast for 15-25 minutes. It is done when the cheese looks tasty:



DONE!
Serve directly from the oven pan:




Guten Appetit! from Bonn.

Contributions, comments and feedback are always appreciated.
 
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bovo said:
Thought I would include a picture of a kitchen gadget that I fully expect no one else in the world would think necessary. It's a device for poking holes in the bottom of eggs so that the shells don't crack when you put them in boiling water. Anyone else use one?
I use a hotsauce bottle and needle to make the hole



Which has the added bonus of bringing that ever needed x factor to every meal as I pour it over the eggs once they are boiled to perfection*






* To boil perfect eggs make your hotsauce/needle hole in the rounder part of the egg, insert in small pan with minimal banging potential and cover with water - boil. Once they are boiling drop to a simmer for 10 minutes then remove hot water and run em under cold for a while (stops you getting that ugly ass black mark around the yellow) then peel, slice artistically and smother in hot sauce. Ideally to be enjoyed with a cup of tea that contains a lot more ingredients than teabag, water, sugar and milk.
 

OnkelC

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replicashooter said:
I use a hotsauce bottle and needle to make the hole


Which has the added bonus of bringing that ever needed x factor to every meal as I pour it over the eggs once they are boiled to perfection*






* To boil perfect eggs make your hotsauce/needle hole in the rounder part of the egg, insert in small pan with minimal banging potential and cover with water - boil. Once they are boiling drop to a simmer for 10 minutes then remove hot water and run em under cold for a while (stops you getting that ugly ass black mark around the yellow) then peel, slice artistically and smother in hot sauce. Ideally to be enjoyed with a cup of tea that contains a lot more ingredients than teabag, water, sugar and milk.
How does the hotsauce bottle fit in this scheme of punching the egg shell? Just wondering.

I used to punch the eggs with a needle or syringe tip before, but then bought a device like bovo pictured.


It is called "Eierpiekser" in German.

As a benefit, the needle in those devices only punch into the egg to a certain depth, thus preventing damage to the inner skin of the egg and counterfeiting the punch effort.
As for the best boiling method, key is to use eggs at room temperature. If you store them in the fridge, take them out about 30 minutes before preparation. They are much less prone to shell-cracking this way. For hard-boiled eggs, I punch them and put them into cold water, then let them boil for 7-10 minutes, depending on size.

For soft yolks, I let the water cook first, then insert the eggs and let them boil for 4-5 minutes. It is crucial to run them under cold water to stop the boiling process. By putting them in boiling water and not heating them up alongside with the water, one can better control the actual cooking and heating time due to the shorter exposition of the egg to the heat. Eggs start to coagulate at around 60 degrees celsius, so the "cooking" process of the egg starts before the water is boiling.

Talking about eggs so much made me hungry. I think tonights dish will be some scrambled eggs with herbs on bread rolls.
 

Mute

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Wow Onkel, your threads may make me consider learning to cook. Some of this looks so good I'm drooling :lol Oh man. Keep 'em coming.
 

OnkelC

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replicashooter said:
*awesome diagram*
lol! Thanks for this graphic explanation.
Mute said:
Wow Onkel, your threads may make me consider learning to cook. Some of this looks so good I'm drooling :lol Oh man. Keep 'em coming.
I'll do my very best, thanks for the feedback.
If you want to learn how to cook, just experiment around a bit with ingredients that you like. Combine them, add some stuff you were always curious about and do not fear failures, they will happen to everybody from time to time. If you got any questions, don't be shy to post them here.
 

OnkelC

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Hi Peru, any progress on your cooking experiences?:)

The ingredients for tonights scrambled eggs are:


fresh eggs,
some milk,
soft cheese,
cress and parsley,
bread rolls,
some alt and pepper.

Cooking starts any minute now, pics will be up as usual. Stay tuned.
 

ChryZ

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Chinese Honey Garlic Pork

One of my all time favs.

main ingredients

2 X pork chops
6 X garlic clove (minced)
2 X coriander leafs

marinate ingredients

1 TBSP soy sauce
1 TBSP rice wine
1 TBSP peanut oil
1 TSP starch

sauce ingredients

2 TBSP honey
1 TBSP brown sugar
4 TBSP water

3 TBSP rice wine
1 TBSP rice wine vinegar

coleslaw ingredients

1 X half white cabbage (shredded)
2 TBSP veg oil
2 TBSP rice wine vinegar
1 TSP soy sauce
1/2 TSP honey or sugar
1 TSP salt and pepper (more or less)

no pics of the coleslaw prep, just shred the cabbage and mix with the other ingredients,
best done a couple of hours in advance, the coleslaw needs some time to develop its full flavour,
it's also great to serve rice instead of it or in addition



trim the fat and tenderize the chops, they'll enlarge by a third
(no fancy hammer here, so I covered the meat with plastic wrap and banged it with a water bottle)



mix marinate ingredients, slice the pork and combine with marinate



mince the garlic while the meat is marinating, prep the sauce and deglaze aid,
get two cups, in the first one mix honey, brown sugar, water and let dissolve,
in the second cup mix rice wine and vinegar, it's the deglaze aid



heat pan or wok and fry the meat swiftly



remove from pan when nicely browned and set aside



lower the heat and ensure to have some oil in pan (peanut oil in my case),
roast the garlic carefully, do not burn it ... that would ruin the whole dish



deglaze the pan with the rice wine/vinegar mix when the garlic is slightly roasted



add the honey mix, stir well and keep an eye on the heat, again: don't burn it,
caramelization is what you are looking for, too hot and the sugar will burn to bitter
coal (carbonization), at this point season to taste with salt and pepper



return the pork when the honey+garlic sauce thickened and caramelized,
stir fry until the pork is glazed thoroughly with sauce



serve on a bed of coleslaw (or rice), garnish with coriander leafs




Enjoy!
 

OnkelC

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Chryz, thank you for this Awesomeness in pork. The marinade would go great with beef, too.

No dish from me tonight, as it is restaurant friday again. Tomorrow, however, I'll do some genuine foccaccia (hybrid of Calzone and bread). Stay tuned and keep'em coming!:lol
 

OnkelC

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Some Impressions from tonights restaurant visit:

Mixed salad with grilled salmon:


Mixed salad with prawns and artichokes:


Sauteed fingerling:



Pizza with Gorgonzola and Radicchio topping:


Enjoy! from Bonn.
Keep yours coming!
 

Cornballer

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Jul 21, 2006
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I learn something new on this thread every time I open it up. Today's lesson...

ChryZ mentions the coriander garnish, and looking at this picture:

I thought it looked a lot like cilantro. Turns out it's the same thing.

Wikipedia on Coriander
The leaves are variously referred to as coriander leaves, cilantro (in the United States, from the Spanish name for the plant), dhania (in the Indian subcontinent, and increasingly, in Britain), Chinese parsley or Mexican parsley.
I've been using coriander seeds (ground) and fresh cilantro for years, and I never knew it was from the same plant.
 

Cornballer

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ChryZ said:
I actually did that on purpose. It felt kinda wrong to use a spanish word to describe an ingredient of a chinese dish.
Oh, so you were deliberately being confusing! ;)

Either way, the recipe looks great and I think I'll give it a try sometime soon. :)
 
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