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How will ray tracing change my gaming experience?

VertigoOA

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From nes to snes one of the biggest improvements was the increase in color palettes.

yes, all this stuff matters.
 

Type_Raver

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While you're probably asking, how will having Ray Tracing change your interactive experience, we probably we see its potential realised until a few generations of RTX cards (or next Next Gen) arrives.

At this time, there are multiple ways Ray Tracing can be used, from reflections, path tracing, ambient occlusion, shadows and more. But each one of these cost a lot of performance, and thats using only one light/bounce. For multiple passes it becomes exponentially expensive. And these are just the graphical implementations; you can also use it for sound and AI paths.

Right now, as is, we have one pass on one type of ray tracing effect, severely limiting its potential which is why the luke-warm reception at this time, imo.
 
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JordanN

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Was done with reflective shadows in Uncharted and Last of Us. When you have only one light source it's pretty trivial.
Even if I could fake the effect, I honestly just wasn't satisfied with the results I was getting back then. I've since switched on over to offline rendering and it fits my idea of 3D compared to real time.

Hell, even now with games finally getting the RTX stuff, I don't think the tech is completely there yet to replace what I can do with Arnold/Mental Ray.
 
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Cato

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How it will change your experience?
Well, the first 3-4 years with games using ray-tracing I suspect
all the games will be very light on content or gameplay and instead just focus on showing cool effects over and over and over

From year 5 and onward you will get games that have RT but also have actual gameplay instead of just being tech demos.
 
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Oct 26, 2018
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I'll realize my real world vision has been a lie the whole time. RT gaming will show the true world where everything from dust to a lump of charcoal will show reflections.

And if the RT horsepower required is that bad, it looks like we'll all be going back to 30 fps gaming.
 

Rat Rage

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Yo dude, because it's RADICAL! How can you even play games these days without RAY TRACING?

Don't tell me you're not cool and play the games the old-fashed way... C'mon, man!

You know the ultimate gaming experience is to play a cinematic VR walking simulator in 8k wth Ray Tracing enabled to the MAX!
 

Animagic

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To go with repurchasing your favorite games with HD Remasters, you can once again repurchase your favorite games, only now Remastered with Ray Tracing.
 
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longdi

Ni hao ma, fellow kids?
Jun 7, 2004
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RT will make games feel more real than before. It is not something obvious like hirez textures or high resolutions

But play a RT game, a good one. You get the calmness that's missing with old rasterisation. It is something you know but can't really explain in words.

The lights just feel like lights, environment feels more 3D accurate, models feels more full of volume that pops out

RT+VR > RT > old 3d pipeline > VR

Hence im holding onto Nvidia shares. Until we get a good AMD competitor
 
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Shmunter

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A picture tells a thousand words....

 

Shmunter

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At the moment, It won't. It doesn't for me (running an RTX 2070 Super). Even with the likes of Control and Wolfenstein Youngblood having excellent RTX features, you soon get used to them/dial down the more expensive features due to the performance hit. It's in no way, shape or form a game changer. It's something that's neat for a few minutes then you just get used to it or plain just don't notice the feature (looking at you, CoD MW's shadows).
Disappointing but it rings true. Small additive details are not the primary focus for a person after awhile. Quintessential Diminishing returns.

There is some chance with RT being the baseline next gen we may see more innovation leading to more meaningful results.
 
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GeorgPrime

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Ray tracing is a rendering technique for generating an image by tracing the path of light as pixels in an image plane and simulating the effects of its encounters with virtual objects. For one thing, games with RT turned on should have far better lighting effects. That, of course, should translate to better-looking games and a feeling that you’re playing inside a world that looks far more realistic.

But. How will ray tracing change my gaming experience? Some gameplay scenarios that could take place with the use of ray traced reflections?


Take minecraft for example:

 

psorcerer

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Even if I could fake the effect, I honestly just wasn't satisfied with the results I was getting back then. I've since switched on over to offline rendering and it fits my idea of 3D compared to real time.

Hell, even now with games finally getting the RTX stuff, I don't think the tech is completely there yet to replace what I can do with Arnold/Mental Ray.

With just a flashlight and RSM it's indistinguishable from the brute force methods. When you need two flashlights it becomes tricky.
 
Feb 8, 2011
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The main thing id like devs to use it for is things like trading the path of the enemies eyes to your character in order for them to see you. If you’re not visible then you’re not visible. But if you’re reflection is visible or your shadow then they can react to that specific thing. They don’t just have to trace the rays for graphics although that is the primary usage. Another example I can think of is if your character has to sneak past close to an enemy but if you’re in enough shadow for them to not see you this could be calculated by how illuminated you are rather than by set boxes around set lights it could be much more seemlessly interactive. Shoot out some lights and the enemy can’t see you stuff like that.

Or in a game you have a sorts of light based puzzle where you have to somehow set up a situation for some sort of panel to capture enough light by moving mirrors, lighting fires or any sort of idea you can think of and it’s all based around the actual amount of light you’ve got hitting some surface.

These are ideas I’ve just pulled from my ass thinking about it for 5 seconds while posting. I’m sure smarter actual game devs could think of much better things than me to make games more interesting using the tech.

Little details like that are what the modernisation in games is all about for me and is the primary reason I am looking forward to TLOU2 so much as it seems to be the biggest jump forward in enemy AI and interaction if it lives up to the impressions and will be the first truly next gen game imo.
 
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JordanN

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isn't some games already do that?

Even the PS1 had it.

You can just mirror the world geometry twice.




What I believe is harder to achieve is having reflections accurate to your material setup (since you can feed texture maps that control roughness,glossiness,reflectivity etc).

Like take metal for example. In offline rendering, they require a lot of sampling but the reflections are never static. For games, they use pre-baked cubemaps but it's not updated.



This image still took a few minutes to render on my PC but you can see different glossiness levels.
 
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SLoWMoTIoN

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It will make you forget about Bethesda's fetch quests.
 

Celcius

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isn't some games already do that?
With traditional rendering, to reflect something it has to already be being rendered in the scene (like Luigi above is already in the frame). With ray tracing you could be playing a first person shooter (where your character model isn’t being rendered and is not visible) but if you pass by a store window then you could see your reflection.
 

AV

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You could argue that if they properly "ray traced" audio it would change the way you hear and react to things in games. I guess that would change it.

But does it need to? Realistically, your "gaming experience" vary rarely changes with hardware. Motion control and VR are two examples legitimate game changers, whether you think they're for the better or worse. For the most part ray tracing is just another visual flare like HDR, albeit a way better/more impressive one.
 

Endless Fluff

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How did real time dynamic shadows change your experience? Were you around when Doom 3 and Silent Hill 2 came out?

RT will do the same.
 

Bootzilla

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Ray tracing is a rendering technique for generating an image by tracing the path of light as pixels in an image plane and simulating the effects of its encounters with virtual objects. For one thing, games with RT turned on should have far better lighting effects. That, of course, should translate to better-looking games and a feeling that you’re playing inside a world that looks far more realistic.

But. How will ray tracing change my gaming experience? Some gameplay scenarios that could take place with the use of ray traced reflections?
Realistically, the next gen and even the last gen are overwhelmingly not about gameplay that was technologically impossible in the last gen. SSDs and more memory maybe make for more immersive and detailed open worlds, but even that is usually more constrained by budget and resources than by technical barriers.

If you want new gameplay frontiers, VR has been fascinating and has evolved a lot in a short time. Even if there are still some design challenges that haven't found their perfect solution yet, a VR game is immediately understandable as something new and different.