Hungarians protest draconian 'slave law' as Orban cracks down on dissent

TheShadowLord

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Jan 7, 2018
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https://www.dw.com/en/hungarians-protest-draconian-slave-law-as-orban-cracks-down-on-dissent/a-46778497

Hungary is seeing its largest protests in years, triggered by an employee-hostile law. But for the protesters, it's about a lot more. Meanwhile, the government, led by strongman PM Viktor Orban, smells a conspiracy.

For days, thousands of Hungarians have been protesting against the Orban government's social policies and against the anti-democratic restructuring of their country. It's a wave of protests the likes of which Hungary hasn't experienced in a long time.

In some cases, police have been using violence and teargas against protesters in the last few days, even though before that there had merely been some scuffles with the officers. Dozens of people, some of them not even part of the protests, were arrested, and many were only released after 12 hours or more.

On Sunday, a large-scale peaceful rally organized by opposition parties and Hungarian trade unions took place without problems — initially. But late on Sunday evening the police again used tear gas against demonstrators when they mobbed the building of Hungary's public radio station.

Sunday night, a group of members of parliament, who have free access to the radio building, demanded in vain to be allowed to read a live petition on the news. They continued their protest in the radio building on Monday. At one point, one of the parliamentary protesters was forcibly thrown out of the building, although this is not permitted under current law for various reasons including parliamentary immunity.

The wave of protests was triggered by an amendment to Hungarian labor law, now known to the public as the "slave law," which was passed in parliament last week. The law increases the possible number of overtime hours per year per employee from 250 to 400. At the same time, employers can now take three years instead of one year to pay overtime.

The amendment was passed over massive protests by trade unions, the opposition and civil organizations. The vote was riotous because the opposition had occupied the podium of the parliamentary president.

But now, a certain part of the Hungarian public is directing all of their anger toward the "slave law." The amendment is putting major social problems — which Orban's system has created in the first place — on the shoulders on employees, and doing so in a brazen way that many consider humiliating. In addition, there is a massive shortage of labor in Hungary as a result of the large number of people leaving the country, which in turn is largely a result of the frustration of many Hungarians with Orban's policies.

But the protests are about more than just the "slave law." A law on the establishment of a new administrative jurisdiction was passed at the same time. It is a new branch of the judicial system, which, unlike the current courts, is largely under the control of the Ministry of Justice.

Cases that are important or sensitive for the government are to be given to the new administrative courts if necessary, thus further undermining the independence of the judiciary in the country.
Other laws also seem to have been the subject of public discontent in recent times. In September, for example, homelessness was virtually banned in Hungary. This is a very broad provision aimed at forcing homeless people into dormitories. Surveys in Hungary have shown that many people in the country do not approve of such action against homeless people.

The fact that former Macedonian Prime Minister Nikola Gruevski, who was sentenced to prison for corruption in his home country, was granted asylum in Hungary in an urgent procedure and now likes to dine in luxury restaurants was also a source of displeasure, as the independent media revealed.

According to a new survey, a majority of Hungarians consider corruption in their country in general to be a greater problem than the danger of migration, which Orban and his government repeatedly evoke.
 

Dude Abides

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Apr 8, 2009
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Three years to pay overtime? Lol. How's that right wing populism working out for you? Has he blamed the protests on Soros yet?
 

DunDunDunpachi

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Apr 18, 2018
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It's sad that it has escalated to the point of protests and violence.

The new branch under the Ministry of Justice is more worrisome, though. It smells of preparation for the Hungarian government to leverage the court system against its own populace.
 

cryptoadam

... and he cannot lie
Feb 21, 2018
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So I don't even really understand this. The employer doesn't have to pay OT for up to 400 hours for 3 years?

Where I live you work OT you get paid OT.
 

norinrad

Member
Aug 13, 2009
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When half of the young has left and the other half is planning to leave, you know you are fucked as a country. Should probably close their borders for their own people from escaping. They built their own Berlin Wall. Long may they enjoy it.
 

Bluntman

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May 8, 2017
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Okay guys, as a Hungarian I'm going to try to explain some stuff that's going on and answer your questions if there is any.

About the overtime law

The standard amount of overtime is still 250 hours / year but it can be increased to a maximum of 400 hours / year but it requires a separate and explicit agreement from the employee. It's basicly for people who want to work more and earn more money. They can now do that legally.

Overtime still has to be payed monthly as usual. The 3 years thing is a completely different case. It's not for people who work on "normal" fixed contract like your standard 9 to 5 jobs, but for people who work by total worktime, or "allocated cumulative working hours". Sorry, English is not my first language so I don't know the exact terms. It's when a company hires Johny to do X hours of work in say 6 months. So it's possible that Johny works 60 hours on one week and then 20 hours the other week. Overtime can only be calculated after his period ends. Now previously you could only work a maximum of 12 months under these conditions but now you can do 36 months, and obviously (just as before) the overtime can be calculated at the end. And it requires an agreement from both the employee and the union. It's an exteremely rare scenario as well.

And thanks to the governments actions, unemployment is at an all time low. There is actually a labor shortage in the country, so employees are in a very good position to negotiate their pay and overtime.


About the administrative courts

It's not a new thing. It worked in Hungary before the communists took over and erased it. It also works in many European countries. It's a proven and effective thing.

It's also not a fuckery with the separation of the branches of power it's just a different organization of the courts work.


About the alleged illegal vote on these laws last wednesday

You can read in some articles (like the one linked on the other board) that the vote on these laws was illegal last wednesday. That's obviously not true. We have a system in the parliament where the representatives have to insterd their "representative ID card" into the machine and then they can cast their vote.

Under normal circumstances. But last wednesday the opposition tried to obstruct the vote by not letting the house speaker up on to his podium. He started the session from his normal seat as a representative anyway but the voting machine only works when the speaker puts in his card first into the machine on the podium what obviusly he couldn't do this time, so they voted without it.

This isn't against any house regulations. And obviously the governing party (Fidesz) has a constitutional majority so they can vote any law without the opposition anyway, so why on earth would they need to cheat with the votes? It's so stupid to even talk about this.

And let me say this again: idiot socialists, communists and "liberals" with barely any support from the people tried to obstruct the work of a democratically elected parliament.


About the protests

Yes, there are protest going on, not very large ones I must say. And yes there were protest at the headquarterts of the national public television. Some opposition representatives then (using their priviligies) went through the police blockade and into the building. Which is fine, they can do that.

But some of them spent the night (and the morning) harrassing the workforce, and trying to go (with force) to the closed areas of the building, to disrupt the work of the newsroom. They also set off fake fire alarms to try to clear the building. So eventually two of the representatives were removed from the building by the security.

Now, they went back yesterday with a plan. They are now playing from the Open Society Institute anarchist playbook, and trying to create images which shows how opressed they are, that will look good in the western liberal media.

So images like these, where they lie on the floor of the television HQ with their hands on their nape like they are about the get shot. Which is obviously stupid.





In this little video clip, you can see one of the socialist representative, Ildikó Bangóné Borbély. She is saying the following: "Turn off the camera, turn off the camera" (camera stays on) "It would be a fucking strong imagery if we lie by staircase with our hand on our nape".

It's also very clear that nobody harrasses her.

The left then again, is a bunch of clowns. They are so stupid and without talent that they can't get the peoples votes so now they try to disrupt the system.
 
Aug 29, 2018
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Thanks for clearing that up Bluntman, the way that article is worded will make any American recoil at the thought of payment for labor being delayed beyond the next pay period. I can see how it you're a private contractor, yet still subject to overtime it would be hell on the accounting. Over here if you sign a contract for a job, you get paid for the job regardless of the labor requirements. That's on you as the employer, or for you to eat it as an individual.
 
Feb 27, 2017
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Okay guys, as a Hungarian I'm going to try to explain some stuff that's going on and answer your questions if there is any.

About the overtime law

The standard amount of overtime is still 250 hours / year but it can be increased to a maximum of 400 hours / year but it requires a separate and explicit agreement from the employee. It's basicly for people who want to work more and earn more money. They can now do that legally.

Overtime still has to be payed monthly as usual. The 3 years thing is a completely different case. It's not for people who work on "normal" fixed contract like your standard 9 to 5 jobs, but for people who work by total worktime, or "allocated cumulative working hours". Sorry, English is not my first language so I don't know the exact terms. It's when a company hires Johny to do X hours of work in say 6 months. So it's possible that Johny works 60 hours on one week and then 20 hours the other week. Overtime can only be calculated after his period ends. Now previously you could only work a maximum of 12 months under these conditions but now you can do 36 months, and obviously (just as before) the overtime can be calculated at the end. And it requires an agreement from both the employee and the union. It's an exteremely rare scenario as well.

And thanks to the governments actions, unemployment is at an all time low. There is actually a labor shortage in the country, so employees are in a very good position to negotiate their pay and overtime.


About the administrative courts

It's not a new thing. It worked in Hungary before the communists took over and erased it. It also works in many European countries. It's a proven and effective thing.

It's also not a fuckery with the separation of the branches of power it's just a different organization of the courts work.


About the alleged illegal vote on these laws last wednesday

You can read in some articles (like the one linked on the other board) that the vote on these laws was illegal last wednesday. That's obviously not true. We have a system in the parliament where the representatives have to insterd their "representative ID card" into the machine and then they can cast their vote.

Under normal circumstances. But last wednesday the opposition tried to obstruct the vote by not letting the house speaker up on to his podium. He started the session from his normal seat as a representative anyway but the voting machine only works when the speaker puts in his card first into the machine on the podium what obviusly he couldn't do this time, so they voted without it.

This isn't against any house regulations. And obviously the governing party (Fidesz) has a constitutional majority so they can vote any law without the opposition anyway, so why on earth would they need to cheat with the votes? It's so stupid to even talk about this.

And let me say this again: idiot socialists, communists and "liberals" with barely any support from the people tried to obstruct the work of a democratically elected parliament.


About the protests

Yes, there are protest going on, not very large ones I must say. And yes there were protest at the headquarterts of the national public television. Some opposition representatives then (using their priviligies) went through the police blockade and into the building. Which is fine, they can do that.

But some of them spent the night (and the morning) harrassing the workforce, and trying to go (with force) to the closed areas of the building, to disrupt the work of the newsroom. They also set off fake fire alarms to try to clear the building. So eventually two of the representatives were removed from the building by the security.

Now, they went back yesterday with a plan. They are now playing from the Open Society Institute anarchist playbook, and trying to create images which shows how opressed they are, that will look good in the western liberal media.

So images like these, where they lie on the floor of the television HQ with their hands on their nape like they are about the get shot. Which is obviously stupid.





In this little video clip, you can see one of the socialist representative, Ildikó Bangóné Borbély. She is saying the following: "Turn off the camera, turn off the camera" (camera stays on) "It would be a fucking strong imagery if we lie by staircase with our hand on our nape".

It's also very clear that nobody harrasses her.

The left then again, is a bunch of clowns. They are so stupid and without talent that they can't get the peoples votes so now they try to disrupt the system.
Thanks for sharing the truth.
 

appaws

Gold Member
Jan 31, 2008
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Orban is of course one of the top targets of the globalists and their misinformation campaigns. They would desperately love to have one of their astroturf "color" revolutions topple him.
 
Mar 18, 2018
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I'm willing to bet conservative parties in many countries have thought of ideas similar to this. Bold move to go thru with it
Would you care to share a list of countries and enumerate why each distinct culture's conservatives would enact similar ideas? Why the ideas are wrong? Or should I file your post under "Hyper-Partisan Hot-take at best, shit post at worst," and move along?