"I need a New PC!" 2012 Thread. 22nm+28nm, Tri-Gate, and reading the OP. [Part 1]

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Skel1ingt0n

I can't *believe* these lazy developers keep making file sizes so damn large. Btw, how does technology work?
What mouse and keyboard?
Alienware TactX for both.

For the mouse, I've gone from stock Dell/MS mice, to a couple Razers, to a fancy MS mouse, and then finally to a G9 from Logitech. The G9 was infinitely better than any mouse I have ever used, and I moved on from that, to a G9X, and then eventually to this TactX - which is just a rebranded G9 but with a more comfortable body. It's the best mouse I've ever used.

I purchased an Orochi for when on the road, and a Pro|Click for my iMac; both from Razer, and I just hate the way Razer mice track. I can't explain it, but I just feel like accuracy goes out the window with their lasers. I bought a Mamba when it was announced, and I promptly returned it. They just track poorly. I'll likely stick with Logitech for the long ride.

The TactX keyboard is okay. I like the lights, and the keys, while membrane, have a decent tactile feel. 100% totally serviceable, and I really have no complaints. But nothing amazing, either.
 

Hazaro

relies on auto-aim
Anand you sneaky bugger http://www.anandtech.com/show/5626/ivy-bridge-preview-core-i7-3770k

IB is the 5-15% over SB we expected with much larger GPUs jumps. I'm excited for the <130W less the 3770k uses under load. I can't wait to crank 200w into that CPU and see where that lands us.
5 hours slow son!
OC potential is the real issue here.

*Good lord some of those Anand comments. How can people be so biased on something that is mostly 100% just performance.
 
5 hours slow son!
OC potential is the real issue here.

*Good lord some of those Anand comments. How can people be so biased on something that is mostly 100% just performance.
So I am, i should start reading some of these in between posts. >_>

I'm betting massive oc potential. It better be, I want some to match up with Keplar.
 
So, I want to upgrade my PC ( everything, both GPU and CPU) but I just read that Intel is about to launch the 3rd generation (Ivy Bridge) .

Since I am also waiting for Nvidia card ( even if its not that good, it may drop the price on the new AMD cards), what would be the wisest choice: get a i5 2500k now and then upgrade the GPU or get everything new later?
2500k is more than you need, trust me on this. OC'd 2500k is insanely powerful and more than ready for next-gen games.
 

JaseC

gave away the keys to the kingdom.
So, I think my SSD is buggered. It shows up in the BIOS, but I can't boot into Windows or launch any of the auxiliary options (e.g. Safe Mode or Startup Repair). Thinking that my Win7 installation may have just kicked the bucket, I attempted a reinstall, but it also hangs at the "Starting Windows" screen after the initial install files have loaded.
 
So, I think my SSD is buggered. It shows up in the BIOS, but I can't boot into Windows or launch any of the auxiliary options (e.g. Safe Mode or Startup Repair). Thinking that my Win7 installation may have just kicked the bucket, I attempted a reinstall, but it also hangs at the "Starting Windows" screen after the initial install files have loaded.
What SSD is it?
 
Can anyone recommend me a good wireless mouse and keyboard combo? Before anyone says just go wired, I need it for TV/couch usage.

I'm currently looking at the Logitech MX5500 but feedback seems to be all over the place. Some are saying the mouse lags, others are saying it's rock solid. No real complaints about the keyboard though.

I'm also looking at the Logitech G700 for just a mouse but then I have no idea what keyboard to go with.

Edit: Should have read the last page since this seemed to be the topic of conversation. I see some love for the G700. If someone can recommend me a decent wireless keyboard then I'll be set.
 
I've got the Logitech Solar Powered Keyboard and a Couch Mouse. No problems here, but I don't game competitively. Works great for Minecraft, Dragon Age, Terraria and such. Couldn't tell you FPS stuff, I am blasphemous and use a x360 controller for those.
 
I despise all things wireless not just because of the latency issues they used to have but because I hate having batteries.
No NKRO, plus added input lag. This is total insanity. If this thread were in the NeoOfficeAgeForums, I could see where you were coming from. Even then though, my office keyboard is a cherry red in PS/2 mode.
mkenyon and scogoth, i think you guys are ignoring the recent trend in gaming. Software developers are now focused on the consoles and these devices all use wireless pads. So having PC peripherals with better or equal performance makes sense.

I do think theres a need for a reasonable priced wireless compact sized keyboard with a touch pad. Im not suggesting people heavily invested in competitive online gaming to go wireless route. But a wireless keyboard with decent performance (assuming it existed) could satisfy most of the typical every day gaming needs. Playing while laying down with the keyboard, mouse and maybe headset cables can get annoying.

Adding to that the PC user is not always gaming, so being able to relax while browsing its a plus and the touch pad will suit this need perfectly.
 
mkenyon and scogoth, i think you guys are ignoring the recent trend in gaming. Software developers are now focused on the consoles and these devices all use wireless pads. So having PC peripherals with better or equal performance makes sense.

I do think theres a need for a reasonable priced wireless compact sized keyboard with a touch pad. Im not suggesting people heavily invested in competitive online gaming to go wireless route. But a wireless keyboard with decent performance (assuming it existed) could satisfy most of the typical every day gaming needs. Playing while laying down with the keyboard, mouse and maybe headset cables can get annoying.

Adding to that the PC user is not always gaming, so being able to relax while browsing its a plus and the touch pad will suit this need perfectly.
Even for casual gaming a touch pad is not an acceptable input device. If all you want is a HTPC then its great but from a gaming perspective its worse than a gamepad.
 
Even for casual gaming a touch pad is not an acceptable input device. If all you want is a HTPC then its great but from a gaming perspective its worse than a gamepad.
I haven't said the touch pad is for gaming, i sugest its inclusion in the wireless KB strictly for light OS or web browsing use. Pointing will still be relegated to a standard wireless mouse or a Wii remote like device.
 
is there a simple way to test if your psu is malfunctioning?

so here's the long winded story of why i'm concerned:

in august of 2010 i built a rig with a corsair CMPSU-850TX 850W psu. after using advice from this thread i erred on the safe side with psu because i heard the cheaper ones were less reliable.

1) i purchased a 120gb SDD (for OS) and a 1TB F3 (for storage/games). the sdd would blue screen after getting w7 installed and updated, and eventually could not even be recognized. i determined (at the time) that the SDD was defective and returned it to microcenter. since i had bought it on sale, they gave me more in-store credit that the initial purchase so i bougth a monitor instead of replacing the SDD. haven't had a chance to replace it, but will some day because when it did work everything was lightning fast.

2) after returning the SDD, i installed windows to the F3. since then (for about the past year), the computer will randomly shut off after an indeterminate amount of time. sometimes it's 1 minute after boot, sometimes it's an hour or so, sometimes i can leave it running for a couple days while downloading large amounts of stuff from steam, and it'll be fine. the drive has never not booted, but this problem has been plauging me for a long time and has been annoying. i figured it was the HDD problems and thought i'd replace it when i have some money since the flooding.

3) purchased a 2TB seagate green 5900rpm. posted this:

so yesterday i got my seagate barracuda green 2TB hard drive in the mail and put it into my rig. not the fastest drive, but i was desperately running out of space.after the boot, the hard drive "beeps" several times, and but then was able to be formatted as an NTFS fine.

maybe 10 minutes later, it now intermittently will "beep" again, lose connection,and then recover and "beep" and be detected and accessible again.

i tried other SATA ports/power cables that are known to work my hard drive containing win 7, and all the ports check out fine, but the new drive keeps doing this.

haven't had much time to look into it/what i may have done wrong (which i suspect is nothing), but does it sound like i should probably just go ahead and start the RMA when i get home from work tonight?
to which a couple responded it sounded like a defective drive.

RMA'd it, got a new drive, and have the same problems, albeit not as severe. the drive is at least still detected at boot, but installing windows to it resulted in blue screens while trying to launch and eventually saying screw it i'll just use it as storage that goes out of sync everyonce and while.

i've been able to migrate my 720gb of steam games over to it and play successfully, but in moments where it's just downloading from steam it'll do the same beep and de-sync.

does it sound like another bad drive or a more serious problem with the psu?
 
is there a simple way to test if your psu is malfunctioning?

so here's the long winded story of why i'm concerned:

in august of 2010 i built a rig with a corsair CMPSU-850TX 850W psu. after using advice from this thread i erred on the safe side with psu because i heard the cheaper ones were less reliable.

1) i purchased a 120gb SDD (for OS) and a 1TB F3 (for storage/games). the sdd would blue screen after getting w7 installed and updated, and eventually could not even be recognized. i determined (at the time) that the SDD was defective and returned it to microcenter. since i had bought it on sale, they gave me more in-store credit that the initial purchase so i bougth a monitor instead of replacing the SDD. haven't had a chance to replace it, but will some day because when it did work everything was lightning fast.

2) after returning the SDD, i installed windows to the F3. since then (for about the past year), the computer will randomly shut off after an indeterminate amount of time. sometimes it's 1 minute after boot, sometimes it's an hour or so, sometimes i can leave it running for a couple days while downloading large amounts of stuff from steam, and it'll be fine. the drive has never not booted, but this problem has been plauging me for a long time and has been annoying. i figured it was the HDD problems and thought i'd replace it when i have some money since the flooding.

3) purchased a 2TB seagate green 5900rpm. posted this:



to which a couple responded it sounded like a defective drive.

RMA'd it, got a new drive, and have the same problems, albeit not as severe. the drive is at least still detected at boot, but installing windows to it resulted in blue screens while trying to launch and eventually saying screw it i'll just use it as storage that goes out of sync everyonce and while.

i've been able to migrate my 720gb of steam games over to it and play successfully, but in moments where it's just downloading from steam it'll do the same beep and de-sync.

does it sound like another bad drive or a more serious problem with the psu?
Usually PSU failures are complete and not intermittent. What motherboard are you using if you can find out what bios revision?
 
GIGABYTE GA-X58A-UD3R, i can look into the bios revision when i get home later today, but whatever was stock is currently on there.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128423

thanks for the info!
Hmm no noted SATA issues with that board. Double check that the HDD is on the intel SATAII ports and in AHCI mode.

Reading newegg there appears to be a very high failure rate with these drives. Also if you could get the error code during the boss that would help.
 
mkenyon and scogoth, i think you guys are ignoring the recent trend in gaming. Software developers are now focused on the consoles and these devices all use wireless pads. So having PC peripherals with better or equal performance makes sense.

I do think theres a need for a reasonable priced wireless compact sized keyboard with a touch pad. Im not suggesting people heavily invested in competitive online gaming to go wireless route. But a wireless keyboard with decent performance (assuming it existed) could satisfy most of the typical every day gaming needs. Playing while laying down with the keyboard, mouse and maybe headset cables can get annoying.

Adding to that the PC user is not always gaming, so being able to relax while browsing its a plus and the touch pad will suit this need perfectly.
I guess that's the beauty of the PC, your options. I play Tribes: Ascend and Dota 2, require zero input lag while having constant 120fps on a real 120hz display, all while sitting in my chair that is substantially more comfortable than any couch. While I certainly don't understand laying down while doing anything on the PC, I can respect that other people really enjoy it and want peripherals and a system designed for it. We can have both!

Though, if someone described trying to achieve this type of situation, I would certainly never suggest a wired keyboard or mouse. If you have a desk with a comfy chair, there's really no reason at all to go wireless.
 
Reposting my Video Card Guide here for OP linkage.

The video card world is a far cry from where it was even a few years ago. Just about every card released was based on the reference design given by AMD and Nvidia. Really, the only reason to buy one OEM over the other was brand loyalty and customer service. Recently though, there has been a trend towards non-reference designs. The plethora of ‘Extreme Editions’ or ‘OC edition’ can leave many buyers completely confused as to what cards they should be looking at purchasing. In some instances, you could see three cards from the same manufacturer that look exactly the same, yet have a great disparity in cost between them. The idea of this guide isn’t to push you towards buying a specific card, but to provide you with the knowledge to make your own decision.

Right now there are basically three classifications of cards to choose from. These classifications generally only exist in the top 4 or 5 best performers from either AMD or Nvidia. For budget type cards, there may be only a few non-reference designs if any at all. For clarity, I will be using the EVGA line of GTX580s to compare the different models.



The first is standard reference design. These are built to Nvidia’s spec with the standard design cooler on it. In the past, this was a good thing as when manufacturers deviated from reference, it was to add in sub-par capacitors and parts to make the card less expensive. Currently, the only solid reasons to buy a reference card is because you just simply can not wait for the non-reference designs to come out, or you want ease of compatibility for after market coolers and water blocks.

The current trend on reference coolers is a ‘blower’ design where the fan sucks air in from the front of the case, pushes it over the heatsink, and exits out of the back of the case. Though it tends to cause higher noise levels and a reduced cooling capacity over many non-reference cards, it has the added benefit of keeping the hot air created by your video card out of your case. This type of card can also sometime include factory overclocks applied, which to be perfectly blunt, is almost always a complete waste of money. The settings are at levels that are easily achieved in thirty minutes of your own tweaking in programs like MSI Afterburner or Sapphire TriXX.



The second class is the non-reference designs. Each third party manufacturer generally has their own proprietary cooler which requires a specific PCB (Printed Circuit Board – the silicon portion of the card) making aftermarket coolers and water blocks generally incompatible. Depending on the brand and quality of the cooler though, this is a minor drawback. Almost all of the non-reference coolers handily outperform the reference coolers.

The better coolers have two major benefits, the first being a much quieter card due to increased fan size and cooling performance. The second is increased overclocking headroom. It’s the same principle of buying a big heatsink for your CPU. More volts means more heat, and with an increased ability to dissipate heat, you can achieve higher clocks.

Some manufacturers go a step further in adding improvements like higher quality capacitors and better voltage regulation. This again leads to higher clocks. If you want to get a great performing card, overclock to higher levels, and keep the noise down in an air-cooling build, this is generally the type of card you want.



The third class of card is a heavily modified version of the base card meant entirely for enthusiasts and overclockers. We’ll call these the ‘extreme edition’ cards. The Classified GTX 580 pictured above takes the original PCB and completely throws out the reference design, keeping only the base chip and memory. Everything from the capacitors It even accepts a third PCI-E power plug to put over 100oW through it to feed voltage levels that would otherwise brick most cards.

Needless to say, these cards have features that generally won’t be taken advantage of by the vast majority of gamers, instead aimed at the overclocking and benching crowd. If you absolutely must have the top of the line card where money is no concern, these can still outperform even the non-reference cards fairly easily even in the hands of an amateur.

Keep in mind, these classifications are generalizations. In some cases the aftermarket coolers can perform worse than the reference design, such as the new XFX R7950 BEDD. There are four manufacturers that time and again bring the absolute best to the table. Like EVGA focuses on Nvidia cards, Sapphire focuses entirely on AMD cards. As a result, they generally get access to the tech sooner than other companies and deliver high quality products. ASUS’s DCII and MSI’s Twin Frozr designs are also consistently good performers.

Really though, as with any major purchase decision, you will want to look at every review possible of the cards you are interested in to compare and contrast benefits. It is a decision that should be weighed heavily, as there is no single component more important than a video card for a gamer.

-zfz.Michalius
 
Hmm no noted SATA issues with that board. Double check that the HDD is on the intel SATAII ports and in AHCI mode.

Reading newegg there appears to be a very high failure rate with these drives. Also if you could get the error code during the boss that would help.
will do, thanks.

i've read that high failure rate as well, but it's getting nominated for a " newegg customer choice award" according to an email i got to vote on it (i know, right?). another $10 RMA is cutting into the whole $100 pricepoint of this damn drive when i bought it on sale a few weeks ago, ugh :/

can't get the bsod error code because the it only flashes for a tenth of second before it reboots.
 
Reposting my Video Card Guide here for OP linkage.

The video card world is a far cry from where it was even a few years ago. Just about every card released was based on the reference design given by AMD and Nvidia. Really, the only reason to buy one OEM over the other was brand loyalty and customer service. Recently though, there has been a trend towards non-reference designs. The plethora of ‘Extreme Editions’ or ‘OC edition’ can leave many buyers completely confused as to what cards they should be looking at purchasing. In some instances, you could see three cards from the same manufacturer that look exactly the same, yet have a great disparity in cost between them. The idea of this guide isn’t to push you towards buying a specific card, but to provide you with the knowledge to make your own decision.

Right now there are basically three classifications of cards to choose from. These classifications generally only exist in the top 4 or 5 best performers from either AMD or Nvidia. For budget type cards, there may be only a few non-reference designs if any at all. For clarity, I will be using the EVGA line of GTX580s to compare the different models.



The first is standard reference design. These are built to Nvidia’s spec with the standard design cooler on it. In the past, this was a good thing as when manufacturers deviated from reference, it was to add in sub-par capacitors and parts to make the card less expensive. Currently, the only solid reasons to buy a reference card is because you just simply can not wait for the non-reference designs to come out, or you want ease of compatibility for after market coolers and water blocks.

The current trend on reference coolers is a ‘blower’ design where the fan sucks air in from the front of the case, pushes it over the heatsink, and exits out of the back of the case. Though it tends to cause higher noise levels and a reduced cooling capacity over many non-reference cards, it has the added benefit of keeping the hot air created by your video card out of your case. This type of card can also sometime include factory overclocks applied, which to be perfectly blunt, is almost always a complete waste of money. The settings are at levels that are easily achieved in thirty minutes of your own tweaking in programs like MSI Afterburner or Sapphire TriXX.



The second class is the non-reference designs. Each third party manufacturer generally has their own proprietary cooler which requires a specific PCB (Printed Circuit Board – the silicon portion of the card) making aftermarket coolers and water blocks generally incompatible. Depending on the brand and quality of the cooler though, this is a minor drawback. Almost all of the non-reference coolers handily outperform the reference coolers.

The better coolers have two major benefits, the first being a much quieter card due to increased fan size and cooling performance. The second is increased overclocking headroom. It’s the same principle of buying a big heatsink for your CPU. More volts means more heat, and with an increased ability to dissipate heat, you can achieve higher clocks.

Some manufacturers go a step further in adding improvements like higher quality capacitors and better voltage regulation. This again leads to higher clocks. If you want to get a great performing card, overclock to higher levels, and keep the noise down in an air-cooling build, this is generally the type of card you want.



The third class of card is a heavily modified version of the base card meant entirely for enthusiasts and overclockers. We’ll call these the ‘extreme edition’ cards. The Classified GTX 580 pictured above takes the original PCB and completely throws out the reference design, keeping only the base chip and memory. Everything from the capacitors It even accepts a third PCI-E power plug to put over 100oW through it to feed voltage levels that would otherwise brick most cards.

Needless to say, these cards have features that generally won’t be taken advantage of by the vast majority of gamers, instead aimed at the overclocking and benching crowd. If you absolutely must have the top of the line card where money is no concern, these can still outperform even the non-reference cards fairly easily even in the hands of an amateur.

Keep in mind, these classifications are generalizations. In some cases the aftermarket coolers can perform worse than the reference design, such as the new XFX R7950 BEDD. There are four manufacturers that time and again bring the absolute best to the table. Like EVGA focuses on Nvidia cards, Sapphire focuses entirely on AMD cards. As a result, they generally get access to the tech sooner than other companies and deliver high quality products. ASUS’s DCII and MSI’s Twin Frozr designs are also consistently good performers.

Really though, as with any major purchase decision, you will want to look at every review possible of the cards you are interested in to compare and contrast benefits. It is a decision that should be weighed heavily, as there is no single component more important than a video card for a gamer.

-zfz.Michalius



+1. but me I like purdy looking cards, like those sparkle calibers with a backplate.... Mmmmm.....
 

Previous

check out my new Swatch
So I'm thinking of buying another 2TB hdd for my system (currently have one SSD and HDD). I'm leaning toward the Samsung F4 but I just got one question, I noticed it is SATA 3Gb/s, would a SATA 6Gb/s drive be a huge improvement in speed? are mechanical drives even capable of taking advantage of that?
 
So I'm thinking of buying another 2TB hdd for my system (currently have one SSD and HDD). I'm leaning toward the Samsung F4 but I just got one question, I noticed it is SATA 3Gb/s, would a SATA 6Gb/s drive be a huge improvement in speed? are mechanical drives even capable of taking advantage of that?
Nope. You wouldn't even notice a difference between Sata 1.5Gb and 3Gb.
 
Have a small problem with my gpu cables. They get loose due to the vibrating floor caused by my footsteps. Once they get loose, theres no power coming and my computer goes haywire. I gotta open it and push the cables back in everytime.

Is there a quick solution for this outside of buying/trying new cables?
 
Read an article on the HD shenanigans going on. Didn't realize there were only 2 hardware manufacturers left and that Samsung was sold to Seagate:(

They need to be careful, though, because the way SSD drives are dropping (due to good old fashioned competition) their milking of the situation could backfire if people just start abandoning platter drives for anything but mass storage.
 
Is there a big difference in performance in games if I have the intel i5 processor over the i7 2600k? I need to trim my budget a bit on my build and this will save me about $100. I am gonna be using GTX 580 1536MB card.
 

Hazaro

relies on auto-aim
Added Vid card guide to OP.
Read an article on the HD shenanigans going on. Didn't realize there were only 2 hardware manufacturers left and that Samsung was sold to Seagate:(

They need to be careful, though, because the way SSD drives are dropping (due to good old fashioned competition) their milking of the situation could backfire if people just start abandoning platter drives for anything but mass storage.
Yup. Too many competitors so very low profit margins.
Now they get to milk this price hike since they'll agree on a fixed price to sell drives at. Awesome.
Is there a big difference in performance in games if I have the intel i5 processor over the i7 2600k? I need to trim my budget a bit on my build and this will save me about $100. I am gonna be using GTX 580 1536MB card.
Nope. Get 2500K.
If you are buying a 1.5GB GTX 580, don't. Get a different card. Fill out list in the OP.
 
so i have another noob pc question, i was burning something and it got stuck burning so i manually ejected the disc but now my dvd-rw wont burn anything but it still reads discs, what should i do i downloaded the drivers and i still dont get anything its an asus drw-24b1st thanks in advance
 
Well crap... I have te Maximus gene-z and apparently the extreme version has Bluetooth. I just bought a vita and I can't sync it to gene z :( is there any other way to get Bluetooth on my pc so the vita can sync to it and have the game music come through my speakers?
 

JaseC

gave away the keys to the kingdom.
You're best bet is to update the firmware if there is one and then do a sanitary erase on it (will format your drive). If that doesn't help then it's certainly dead.
I'm reinstalling Windows to the drive as we speak, so this seems to have done the trick. Fortunately, I don't think I had anything overly important stored on the drive, so the loss of data isn't bothersome. Cheers. :)
 
Well crap... I have te Maximus gene-z and apparently the extreme version has Bluetooth. I just bought a vita and I can't sync it to gene z :( is there any other way to get Bluetooth on my pc so the vita can sync to it and have the game music come through my speakers?
Get a cheap bluetooth adapter.
 
So I already bought 8 gb of memory of one brand, and the GPU I ordered came with another 8 gb of another brand. Can I just load in all 16 gb? The fact that they're different brands shouldn't matter, right?

Edit: And actually now that I know which GPU I ordered, I can also ask, is a 550W power supply enough for a GTX 560 1 GB card?
 
Well crap... I have te Maximus gene-z and apparently the extreme version has Bluetooth. I just bought a vita and I can't sync it to gene z :( is there any other way to get Bluetooth on my pc so the vita can sync to it and have the game music come through my speakers?
You can get a USB dongle on Ebay for like $5.
 

Hazaro

relies on auto-aim
So I already bought 8 gb of memory of one brand, and the GPU I ordered came with another 8 gb of another brand. Can I just load in all 16 gb? The fact that they're different brands shouldn't matter, right?

Edit: And actually now that I know which GPU I ordered, I can also ask, is a 550W power supply enough for a GTX 560 1 GB card?
Generally it will be ok, sometimes not. Are both sticks rated at the same voltage? Timings and speeds?
Manually set them in the BIOS.

A good 550w is more than enough. Brand?
 
Power supply is XFX Pro550W. The RAMs are 8gb of the 1.5v corsair vengeance mentioned in the OP, and the ones that came as a pack-in are 1.65v 1600 MHz, PNY brand.
 

Hazaro

relies on auto-aim
Power supply is XFX Pro550W. The RAMs are 8gb of the 1.5v corsair vengeance mentioned in the OP, and the ones that came as a pack-in are 1.65v 1600 MHz, PNY brand.
It's mentioned in a few places in the OP that that PSU is fine with that graphics.

I would not run 1.5 and 1.65V RAM together.
You could probably run them at 1.65V with loose timings (9-9-9-24(or 25), but if you aren't using more than 8GB it's not going to do anything for you. I'd sell them off.
 

JaseC

gave away the keys to the kingdom.
Now that my SSD is functional again, how do I go about deleting the unnecessary files/folders left over from the previous Windows installation on another drive?

Edit: Never mind, I eventually found a solution via Google.
 
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