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I think I saw a bug in the simulation, guys.

GAMETA

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Just now. Got home from the supermarket and was cleaning the products with alcohol, got to the 2L Coke bottle and noticed it was different.

Like a different or renewed plastic bottle shape design, simpler and with different curves, no "crevices", just completely smooth, it was like another bottle completely, it reminded me of the old glass simpler bottles even, I even said "Did they change the bottle design?" to my wife but she didn't pay it attention.

She said "pass me the bottle, I'm thirsty" and as I did, the bottle slipped her hands and dropped to the floor and bounced... She got it from the floor, was a relief it didn't pop open, that would've made a mess...

Anyway, she filled her glass and left the bottle on the kitchen table as she helped me with the rest of the groceries, we finished, and as I reached to take the Coke bottle I noticed it was back to the original bottle design I'm used to. That confused me.

I asked "Is this the bottle we just brought from the supermarket?", she said "Yes, why?", I said "Are you sure?". She looked confused. I looked in the fridge to make sure. I said "It changed, the bottle shape changed, it's like the usual ones now"... She just rolled her eyes with a smirk like a "you're an idiot".


It's an idiotic story, I know, but I'm really really sure the bottle's changed, I'm convinced of it, because I noticed it right away, I remember the details of looking at the "new bottle" and noticing the differences, I have tactile memories, sight and even the fact that I asked my wife if she noticed it was different...

I'm even thinking the bottles could've swapped when it dropped to the floor, which was weird now that I think of it...


What do you think of it, guys? I'm not freaked out or anything, it's just plain confusing.
 

LOLCats

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Sep 5, 2013
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have you ever seen that old twilight zone episode with the people between time. sometimes they put the wrong things back in time just for a moment.

or more often when they forget to put something back for an instant.

its noticed when you "just looked there" for something, but when you check the same spot again the item is there.
 
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GAMETA

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You forgot to mention that you and your wife shop while high on meth. Context matters, OP.

Nah, I don't do drugs.

I'm wondering if higher levels of CO2 can cause this kind of distortion/confusion though...

We had sex before going to the supermarket, and we went and went back by foot (we live like 8 minutes away from it), we were wearing masks the whole time, and I brought by myself about 12 kilos (26 pounds) worth of groceries.

So maybe my brain was a little high on CO2? Maybe my brain was indeed confused and interpreted the bottle in a different way? I don't know...

But then again, it's weird, everything else was exactly as it should be.
 
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nush

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Oct 16, 2017
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A long haul flight from wherever you are.
Nah, I don't do drugs.

I'm wondering if higher levels of CO2 can cause this kind of distortion/confusion though...

We had sex before going to the supermarket, and we went and went back by foot (we live like 8 minutes away from it), we were wearing masks the whole time, and I brought by myself about 12 kilos (26 pounds) worth of groceries.

So maybe my brain was a little high on CO2? Maybe my brain was indeed confused and interpreted the bottle in a different way? I don't know...

But then again, it's weird, everything else was exactly as it should be.

I've gotta huff some of this C02 stuff, sounds wild!
 
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GAMETA

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LOL, you're all making fun of the thread but it's actually a serious thread.

That was fucking weird. This will sound funny but if that's how those people that swear they saw aliens feel, then I guess they really believe they saw it, because that's how I'm feeling right now.

I know what I saw. What I don't know is if that was actually reality or just my brain messing things up... I'm more convinced it's the latter, but anyway, that's fucking weird.
 

Rentahamster

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It's an idiotic story, I know, but I'm really really sure the bottle's changed, I'm convinced of it, because I noticed it right away, I remember the details of looking at the "new bottle" and noticing the differences, I have tactile memories, sight and even the fact that I asked my wife if she noticed it was different...

I'm even thinking the bottles could've swapped when it dropped to the floor, which was weird now that I think of it...


What do you think of it, guys? I'm not freaked out or anything, it's just plain confusing.
OP, this is why eyewitness testimony is not reliable.
 

Stilton Disco

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Maybe it was over pressurised and it warped the plastic, so once opened it was able to go back to its norm shape?

Not that I've not had were shit happen I can't explain either. Sometimes reality is just unreliable.
 
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PhoenixTank

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Nah, I don't do drugs.

I'm wondering if higher levels of CO2 can cause this kind of distortion/confusion though...

We had sex before going to the supermarket, and we went and went back by foot (we live like 8 minutes away from it), we were wearing masks the whole time, and I brought by myself about 12 kilos (26 pounds) worth of groceries.

So maybe my brain was a little high on CO2? Maybe my brain was indeed confused and interpreted the bottle in a different way? I don't know...

But then again, it's weird, everything else was exactly as it should be.
Carbon Monoxide poisoning can do weird things if you've got a leak at home?
 
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Frito_Pendejo

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Oddly enough I had a weird thing happen to me one day while driving my to my ex’s apartment 6 years ago. She lived close to DC and while driving on the GW parkway I happened to look up at the trees and I swear to this day it looked like a hologram or some shit. The tree itself I mean. The best way I can describe it is the scene from the cabin in the woods where Hemsworth tries to jump his dirt bike and hits the fake wall. I wasn’t drunk or high and it’s something I will never forgot. I have thought about that day pretty much everyday since it happened.
 

Cutty Flam

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Whenever I would wake up real early for collage courses or work anywhere from 4-5am I would always look where I step or walk, with those sleepy eyes pointed to the floor and I usually see a green grid of small squares where the carpet is. I think it happens to a lot of people. It happens often for me. Idk why I only started to see it starting in college though? I never saw it before then for some reason as in hs, middle school, or elementary school

Wonder why
 
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Nah, I don't do drugs.

I'm wondering if higher levels of CO2 can cause this kind of distortion/confusion though...

We had sex before going to the supermarket, and we went and went back by foot (we live like 8 minutes away from it), we were wearing masks the whole time, and I brought by myself about 12 kilos (26 pounds) worth of groceries.

So maybe my brain was a little high on CO2? Maybe my brain was indeed confused and interpreted the bottle in a different way? I don't know...

But then again, it's weird, everything else was exactly as it should be.
I think you need to go into details. The C02 angle seems legit but we need to fully understand the routine you both put in to properly assess the situation.
 
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GAMETA

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Nah, but you wouldn't necessarily know if there was a problem with CO at home without a detector.

I don't see how I could have a CO leak around here. I live in an apartment and in Brazil, there's no piped gas, heater, candles, engine running, nothing... out kitchen gas is a mix of propane and butane + sulfur for smell warning... plus. all windows were open... so nope. I don't think that was the problem.
 

Damage Inc

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Nah, I don't do drugs.

I'm wondering if higher levels of CO2 can cause this kind of distortion/confusion though...

We had sex before going to the supermarket, and we went and went back by foot (we live like 8 minutes away from it), we were wearing masks the whole time, and I brought by myself about 12 kilos (26 pounds) worth of groceries.

So maybe my brain was a little high on CO2? Maybe my brain was indeed confused and interpreted the bottle in a different way? I don't know...

But then again, it's weird, everything else was exactly as it should be.

Why are you wearing a mask while having sex?
 

GAMETA

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Wut? Carbon monoxide is an actual molecule.
I was never good at chemistry. CO2 can't be broken or "reacted" into CO (C1O1)? Seemed plausible to me considering letters and numbers, not by the mask, of course, lol
 
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Rentahamster

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I was never good at chemistry. CO2 can't be broken or "reacted" into CO (C1O1)? Seemed plausible to me considering letters and numbers, not by the mask, of course, lol

Carbon monoxide consists of one carbon atom and one oxygen atom, connected by a triple bond that consists of a net two pi bonds and one sigma bond. It is the simplest oxocarbon and is isoelectronic with other triply-bonded diatomic species possessing 10 valence electrons

 
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infinitys_7th

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I have no idea what that means. What I thought was more like this:


Imagine not knowing sp-hydridization.



Most organic (i.e. carbon + another atom or molecule) bonds are some combination or single bonding (sp3 hydridization), double bonding (sp2 hybridization), or triple bonding (sp hydrization) bonding. Carbon monoxide is a triple bonded carbon and oxygen atom, which means that there is a single lone election pairs on each end of the line between the C and O, opposite of each other due to negative charges repulsing negative charges or however deep you want to go. This is a completely linear arrangement.

O is very polar, so it "draws" the electrons from the lone pair on the C side, making the molecule highly reaction with metal cations. This is what makes it poisonous - it binds with the iron complexed within hemoglobin in your blood and renders it unable to carry oxygen to your cells, causing cellular asphyxiation.

CO2 is also linear, but due to being balanced by the O=C=O configuration, with polar O's on either side of the C, it is not polar, and is normally unreactive at standard conditions.
 
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GAMETA

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Imagine not knowing sp-hydridization.



Most organic (i.e. carbon + another atom or molecule) bonds are some combination or single bonding (sp3 hydridization), double bonding (sp2 hybridization), or triple bonding (sp hydrization) bonding. Carbon monoxide is a triple bonded carbon and oxygen atom, which means that there is a single lone election pairs on each end of the line between the C and O, opposite of each other due to negative charges repulsing negative charges or however deep you want to go. This is a completely linear arrangement.

O is very polar, so it "draws" the electrons from the lone pair on the C side, making the molecule highly reaction with metal cations. This is what makes it poisonous - it binds with the iron complexed within hemoglobin in your blood and renders it unable to carry oxygen to your cells, causing cellular asphyxiation.

CO2 is also linear, but due to being balanced by the O-C-O configuration, with polar O's on either side of the C, it is not polar, and is normally unreactive at standard conditions.
I see, so you'd need energy and other polar molecules to "break" it, right?
 

infinitys_7th

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I see, so you'd need energy and other polar molecules to "break" it, right?

If you break a double or triple bond, generally a large amount of energy will be released. The more bonds, the more stability, the more energy stored in that stable state. Of course, the exact amounts vary depending on the atoms involved and their neighbors.

Other polar molecules don't break bonds, but instead will cause the bond to go down a step once one of the double/triple bonded atoms in the molecule bond to it (this is called an addition reaction in organic chemistry because you are adding the molecules together, almost always across a double/triple bond), and they usually need to the "kick" of polarization to jumpstart that. That's why nitrogen gas (diatomic nitrogen, N2) is so stable - it is non-polar and the two Ns are triple bonded to each other. CO2 is stable for a similar reason - having two adjacent double bonds create an effective bond strength higher than one double bond but less than a triple bond. To get CO2 to react significantly you generally to add energy, e.g. pressurized CO2 in soda to give it a fizz. Under the right pressure, CO3^2- is a more stable configuration than CO2, and so it dissolves in soda and gasses off when you open the can and relieve the pressure.
 
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-Arcadia-

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This is a really fun thread. I don’t know if it’s true or not (for what it’s worth, I feel like I trust you OP), but either way, I love reading about spooky stuff like this, and letting the imagination fire.

What’s kind of cool, is that I’ve seen this exact glitch before in Fortnite. A model reverting when smacked with collision hard enough.

I’m not exactly convinced we’re living in a simulation (and beyond that, have questions about what even a sufficiently advanced simulation is — is a complete reality created by a simulation, one that’s indistiguishable, even able to be considered a simulation from a philosophical standpoint anymore, or just another nested reality? What even is reality at that point? Does it matter how it’s made?), but moments like this make me wonder. I’ve had the moments others have described in this thread (missing thing turns up someplace you’re almost sure you looked for it), but I’ve never thought to connect them to simulation theory or glitches before.
 

infinitys_7th

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This is a really fun thread. I don’t know if it’s true or not (for what it’s worth, I feel like I trust you OP), but either way, I love reading about spooky stuff like this, and letting the imagination fire.

What’s kind of cool, is that I’ve seen this exact glitch before in Fortnite. A model reverting when smacked with collision hard enough.

I’m not exactly convinced we’re living in a simulation (and beyond that, have questions about what even a sufficiently advanced simulation is — is a complete reality created by a simulation, one that’s indistiguishable, even able to be considered a simulation from a philosophical standpoint anymore, or just another nested reality? What even is reality at that point? Does it matter how it’s made?), but moments like this make me wonder. I’ve had the moments others have described in this thread (missing thing turns up someplace you’re almost sure you looked for it), but I’ve never thought to connect them to simulation theory or glitches before.

Based on quantum theory, "glitches" should be very, very rare - though technically possible, it is extremely unlike for something to just appear/disappear.

So if that were happening, it suggests some other mechanism altered the probability of that occurring or impacting how it occurs. If, say, there was some sort of system in place that interprets reality and one-too-many electrons bound to an object just happen to be miles away from their atom with a certain skewing, maybe the system interprets that object as being at a different location from where it was? Sort of like it "triangulates" the object's location based on the position of the electrons to render it. Just a thought.
 

PhoenixTank

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I don't see how I could have a CO leak around here. I live in an apartment and in Brazil, there's no piped gas, heater, candles, engine running, nothing... out kitchen gas is a mix of propane and butane + sulfur for smell warning... plus. all windows were open... so nope. I don't think that was the problem.
Nearly tagged "But if you can rule out the common sources..." onto the the end of my reply but fair enough.
Still a whole lot more common than Carbon Dioxide making you see things I'd have thought. We have to tolerate some of it just from living.

Lol you wipe all the things from the grocery store down with alcohol before putting them away?

:messenger_tears_of_joy: :messenger_tears_of_joy:
Dude is in Brazil. I don't blame him right now.
 
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Frito_Pendejo

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This is a really fun thread. I don’t know if it’s true or not (for what it’s worth, I feel like I trust you OP), but either way, I love reading about spooky stuff like this, and letting the imagination fire.

What’s kind of cool, is that I’ve seen this exact glitch before in Fortnite. A model reverting when smacked with collision hard enough.

I’m not exactly convinced we’re living in a simulation (and beyond that, have questions about what even a sufficiently advanced simulation is — is a complete reality created by a simulation, one that’s indistiguishable, even able to be considered a simulation from a philosophical standpoint anymore, or just another nested reality? What even is reality at that point? Does it matter how it’s made?), but moments like this make me wonder. I’ve had the moments others have described in this thread (missing thing turns up someplace you’re almost sure you looked for it), but I’ve never thought to connect them to simulation theory or glitches before.

My experience is the only one I’ve ever had. I’ve never seen ghosts or anything really out of the ordinary other than what I saw that day. It was like a graphical glitch or something. I’m an extremely skeptical individual as well so for me to believe what I saw is tough. I’ve gone back and forth questioning what I saw that day and if it really happened but I’m totally convinced it happened. It wouldn’t stand out to me so much in my memory all these years later if it was something trivial.
 

GAMETA

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Lol you wipe all the things from the grocery store down with alcohol before putting them away?

:messenger_tears_of_joy: :messenger_tears_of_joy:

Yeah, ever since February. Every single item brought home is cleansed with alcohol. Every time and all the time outside we wear a mask. Shoes stay at the entrance. No visitors in the house. No unnecessary going out, only for work, groceries and required things.

My father got it, my godmother got it, her sons and close family got it, one of our friends got it, spread to her family and lost her father. Her mother and sister needed intensive care...

I'm not the kind of person freaking out about the virus, but don't see how taking precautions is funny. Say what you want, I want my family safe.
 

GAMETA

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lol fuck no

That's just going too far and is gonna set people up for a lifetime of germaphobia. Being safe during these times is smart, but going overboard is just gonna make people crazy for years to come.

How's cleaning stuff that is exposed in supermarkets crazy? It's the most active and basic place, the products are sitting there all day long, 7 days a week...

There's no concrete information on how long the virus survives on surfaces... so yeah, I'm cleaning the shit out of stuff I bring home.