I'm gonna argue that while not perfect the state of our nation's police force right now is the best it has ever been

Nov 13, 2013
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There are a lot of people out there who believe that police brutality and violence on civilians has run rampant and is worse than it has ever been. While it isn't perfect and we still need to make strides to get better, I'm going to argue that it's the best it has ever been in the history of this country and will only continue to get better.

For one, social media has skewed the perception. Before the era of social media, people in NYC were not going to know about the case of an unarmed civilian in Lexington, Kentucky being beat up by cops. Now, every incident makes national news and hits social media, so the perception is out there that it's worse than ever before. Not only is it not worse, it has gotten much better.

In the late 80s to the early to mid 90s it was at its worst. Crime at that point was the worst in our nation’s history, racism was more prevelant and commonplace then compared to today and if we had social media back then, it would have been far more littered with stories that we get now all over twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.

Even in decades like the 60s and prior before crime in this country really started to take off, racism was even more extreme back then than it was in the 80s and 90s, and corruption was more commonplace. It just so happens that not only was there not social media, but media period back then was so limited, and people turned a blind eye with racism-related incidents because it was considered acceptable. Violent crime wasn’t nearly as common during the 60s and prior, so police were trained differently and many didn’t have the quick trigger fingers that they have today from working in major cities that have such significant levels of crime since the growth of crime in our country really started around the late 70s and into the 80s. There just weren’t as many incidents back then that were going to happen due to the nature(or lack thereof) of violent crime in the country back then.

I think most level-headed and rational people realize that you can’t just cut down on police incidents overnight. It is a gradual process. So we should just wish for improvement. I’m arguing we have improved. Police now wear body cameras, police are trained differently and better, police are more sesnsitive to situations, and many have learned from mistakes of the past. And things will only get better. We are going to have incidents that make news, that is always going to happen when anyone is given authority or firearms, but it’s so much better than it used to be and I feel people have really lost sight of the strides being made and the reality is misperceived because of social media and political agendas.

What say you?
 
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I think the rising distrust of government (nothing new) and the publicized incidents of police violence and brutality means that the police need to prove their worth to an unimpressed populace. While that might not seem fair, I can't really think of a time when police were universally loved, respected, and cherished by their society. They will always carry some stigma against them, even though their duty is essential to a functioning society and even when they "do a good job".
 
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Maybe but I disagree with them on principle. Federalized police forces made up of mostly of military veterans is just not a good idea.

The federal government sends kids to needless war and then puts a badge on them. They end up treating their job like it’s a war zone.

Then to top it off the federal government gives them increased power and equipment to use on the population. Eg Patriot act and armored vehicles

It’s not just the brutality it is basically creating a standing Army that protects the government.

Sending SWAT teams to serve warrants is not how police used to work just a few short decades ago.

It is in essence a violation of the 3rd amendment.
 
Dec 12, 2013
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Having lived in the US and Europe I can definitely say without a doubt that the US police is way better. They actually do policing and go after criminals whereas the police in western europe just harasses honest citizens and let the criminal scum run amuck. It's not entirely their fault though, if they went after real criminals and "god forbid" injured one of them during an arrest attempt they would be sued and possibly go to prison.

I lean to the left but the thing I have ZERO tolerance for is violent crime. If a person commits a violent and heinous crime I could care less what happens to them. If the police have to shoot them to catch them before they hurt somebody else then so be it. As Ivan Drago once said: "if he dies, he dies". I won't shed tears for violent rapists, pedos and murderers, that's for sure. People and especially children and the elderly shouldn't have to ever feel afraid to go outside.
 
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If you ask me police are getting red tape too often. In my city, there were string of crime involving stealing Canada Goose coat the past few weeks. Police sighted suspect vehicle, a stolen BMW , and they were ordered to be call out when the chase happen .

Police need to be allowed to do what need to be done to keep the city safe, not oversights by civilian who doesn't even know the danger of the street nor the attorney general who keep releasing known criminal
 
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My only contact with police has been when I accidentally triggered a house alarm and they show up at my house, and it's usually a hottie police lady who asks me if everything is ok.
 
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#9
That’s the thing about law enforcement that makes it so tough is even if it’s one bad cop on a million, even if it’s one bad cop in 10 million, that one still has the power to murder someone (more or less).

I’ll admit that, in many cases, cops are in a no-win situation.

But due to the nature of a “bad cop scenario,” versus say a bad cook who spits in food, or a bad delivery man who crushes packages, it’s just so high profile and the stakes are so much higher.
 
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That’s the thing about law enforcement that makes it so tough is even if it’s one bad cop on a million, even if it’s one bad cop on 10 million, that one still has the power to murder someone (more or less).

I’ll admit that, in many cases, cops are in a no-win situation
This is true.

Cop sees a vehicle driving down the street, maybe driving a little slowly, looking a little suspicious. Driver is a black dude. Do you trust your gut and pull it over and ask for license and registration and be labeled a racist for pulling over a black guy? What if he lets it go and the driver of that car was committing a crime and he just let it go and it ends with someone losing their life and he didn't trust his gut and do his job out of fear of being labeled a racist? No win situation.

Not to mention we don't know regardless of how that officer chooses to deal with a situation like that, what he's been through in his career. Maybe he was in a similar situation, and the choice he made ended up being a bad choice that led to the loss of a life or maybe a civilian or even a partner being shot or hurt, altering his mindset and decisions he would make in future? What if the officer works in a very violent district and needs to be more on guard than your average officer?

There's so much that goes into it. It's always easy to play armchair police officer.
 
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#11
I think a heard a comedian say that the answer to bad cops is you make the the minimum starting salary for a police officer something crazy like 200k a year but also make it the absolute hardest job to get and the hardest to maintain (constant evaluations and trial assessments, unprecedented accountability).

It sounds kinda crazy but if you think about it, only the absolute best and brightest should have the power to determine when lethal force is necessary, but why would the absolute best and brightest take a job that pays like 60k or whatever it is, except for the truly good “best and brightest” people who really believe in helping and making a difference

Anyway sorry for rambling
 
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#12
This is true.

Cop sees a vehicle driving down the street, maybe driving a little slowly, looking a little suspicious. Driver is a black dude. Do you trust your gut and pull it over and ask for license and registration and be labeled a racist for pulling over a black guy? What if he lets it go and the driver of that car was committing a crime and he just let it go and it ends with someone losing their life and he didn't trust his gut and do his job out of fear of being labeled a racist? No win situation.

Not to mention we don't know regardless of how that officer chooses to deal with a situation like that, what he's been through in his career. Maybe he was in a similar situation, and the choice he made ended up being a bad choice that led to the loss of a life or maybe a civilian or even a partner being shot or hurt, altering his mindset and decisions he would make in future? What if the officer works in a very violent district and needs to be more on guard than your average officer?

There's so much that goes into it. It's always easy to play armchair police officer.
That's... really not a good example of a no-win situation. The correct answer there is "don't pull him over," because there's no indication that he's even thinking of committing a crime other than his speed and a bit of suspicion.

If anything, this explains precisely why the police need (and to a degree, are getting) greater accountability. You don't pull cars over based on hunches, because that leads to the problems the black community complains about: cops pulling them over for driving in the 'wrong' neighbourhood, arbitrary on-the-street questioning, that sort of thing. Even if it's a more dangerous area, even if you have bad past experiences, you don't assume someone is a criminal merely because they aren't conformists. You wait until there's stronger evidence of a crime or intent to commit a crime.
 
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That's... really not a good example of a no-win situation. The correct answer there is "don't pull him over," because there's no indication that he's even thinking of committing a crime other than his speed and a bit of suspicion.

If anything, this explains precisely why the police need (and to a degree, are getting) greater accountability. You don't pull cars over based on hunches, because that leads to the problems the black community complains about: cops pulling them over for driving in the 'wrong' neighbourhood, arbitrary on-the-street questioning, that sort of thing. Even if it's a more dangerous area, even if you have bad past experiences, you don't assume someone is a criminal merely because they aren't conformists. You wait until there's stronger evidence of a crime or intent to commit a crime.
Sure you do. Police are taught to trust their instincts, and it's the job of an officer to check it out if they get bad vibes from a situation. Not doing so if they feel something is off would be negligent. As long as the police officer does do his job and handle things the right way, does getting pulled over suck? Sure. But it's up to the civilian to keep his cool and not get outraged by it. Being in a society is a give and a take, we all need to make sacrifices to some degree to make our society safe. The sacrifices officers make is putting their lives on the line everyday. Ours is putting up with and tolerating the occasional stop by officer.

If a cop gets a bad vibe in a situation he should always always always pull over the car, or stop the civilian on the street, or do whatever. The downside to not doing it and something going horribly wrong is much greater than the inconvenience of the individual.
 
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Cops are fine. There is probably not a higher % of asshole cops than in other professions. My issue is that the law they enforce is not always sensible. Nonviolent drug offene arrests should be cut in half.

For one, social media has skewed the perception. Before the era of social media, people in NYC were not going to know about the case of an unarmed civilian in Lexington, Kentucky being beat up by cops. Now, every incident makes national news and hits social media, so the perception is out there that it's worse than ever before. Not only is it not worse, it has gotten much better.
This is true and it applies to other things as well. Such as when an illegal kills an American citizen, it gets circulated quickly and people know about it within an hour from when it happens. People pay attention to headlines not trends & statistical reporting.

The federal government sends kids to needless war and then puts a badge on them. They end up treating their job like it’s a war zone.
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Militarization of police is a real thing but I'd like to point out most soldiers never see combat. The nerd in the drone operation van has killed more enemies than a room of marines.
 
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#15
Sure you do. Police are taught to trust their instincts, and it's the job of an officer to check it out if they get bad vibes from a situation. Not doing so if they feel something is off would be negligent. As long as the police officer does do his job and handle things the right way, does getting pulled over suck? Sure. But it's up to the civilian to keep his cool and not get outraged by it. Being in a society is a give and a take, we all need to make sacrifices to some degree to make our society safe. The sacrifices officers make is putting their lives on the line everyday. Ours is putting up with and tolerating the occasional stop by officer.

If a cop gets a bad vibe in a situation he should always always always pull over the car, or stop the civilian on the street, or do whatever. The downside to not doing it and something going horribly wrong is much greater than the inconvenience of the individual.
Really? A "bad vibe?" I'm sorry, but you need more than that. I'm not even asking much. Someone driving well outside of the speed limit. Someone looping around the same area multiple times. In other words, reasonable evidence that something's amiss, rather than just a vague emotional response.

Yes, society involves sacrifices, but you know what that also means? Police officers have to respect people and not arbitrarily stop them without probable cause. If you hadn't noticed, police work for the people, not the other way around. Their anxiety is not more important than preventing systemic discrimination.
 
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Really? A "bad vibe?" I'm sorry, but you need more than that. I'm not even asking much. Someone driving well outside of the speed limit. Someone looping around the same area multiple times. In other words, reasonable evidence that something's amiss, rather than just a vague emotional response.

Yes, society involves sacrifices, but you know what that also means? Police officers have to respect people and not arbitrarily stop them without probable cause. If you hadn't noticed, police work for the people, not the other way around. Their anxiety is not more important than preventing systemic discrimination.
What you call "bad vibe", our legal system call discretion. It's practically the lifeblood of the criminal justice system, used at all levels from the beat cop all the way up to the prosecutor in trial, to the judge in sentencing and to the probation after release. You sure have a very naive understanding of how the world works judging by how simple your problem solving abilities are.

Take away discretion and you're left with the grand result of Chicago, a crime ridden and dangerous city where law enforcement have basically gave up. If you are only seeking to be "morally" righteous, then consequences and aftermath are not important to you. I would argue such simplistic rationale are dangerous and should never be given a chance to implement in real life.

Police work for the people(who pay taxes), police do not work for illegal immigrants, gang members, bad guys. You forgot that important part.
 
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#20
Really? A "bad vibe?" I'm sorry, but you need more than that. I'm not even asking much. Someone driving well outside of the speed limit. Someone looping around the same area multiple times. In other words, reasonable evidence that something's amiss, rather than just a vague emotional response.

Yes, society involves sacrifices, but you know what that also means? Police officers have to respect people and not arbitrarily stop them without probable cause. If you hadn't noticed, police work for the people, not the other way around. Their anxiety is not more important than preventing systemic discrimination.
A bad vibe is just a term I used, it's up to the discretion of the officer to decide what just doesn't feel right in a certain situation. It's not an "emotional" response per se, it's instinctual. When you work the streets for a long time you develop instincts that give you a feel in a certain situation.

You don't need probable cause to stop someone, you need it to search someone or a vehicle. Police do work for the people, and stopping someone in a situation they think seems amiss is working for the people. Why else would they be stopping them? To feel better about themselves? They are doing it because they think this person could potentially be a danger to others.

It's not discrimination if they have a reason. Us outsiders can project discrimination onto a situation and there are situations that occur because of discrimination, but that doesn't mean it happens in above hypothetical scenario. Officers need to do their job and not worry about being labeled.
 
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Feb 22, 2009
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#21
A bad vibe is just a term I used, it's up to the discretion of the officer to decide what just doesn't feel right in a certain situation. It's not an "emotional" response per se, it's instinctual. When you work the streets for a long time you develop instincts that give you a feel in a certain situation.

You don't need probable cause to stop someone, you need it to search someone or a vehicle. Police do work for the people, and stopping someone in a situation they think seems amiss is working for the people. Why else would they be stopping them? To feel better about themselves? They are doing it because they think this person could potentially be a danger to others.

It's not discrimination if they have a reason. Us outsiders can project discrimination onto a situation and there are situations that occur because of discrimination, but that doesn't mean it happens in above hypothetical scenario. Officers need to do their job and not worry about being labeled.
But it's not really working for the people if it enables systemic abuses of power, is it? The very problem black people complain about is that police use flimsy excuses to pull them over, question them, frisk them... there's actually a running 'joke' in the community about being stopped for "driving while black." You set the higher standard both to prevent these abuses and to avoid wasting officers' time.

And it's not about officers worrying about being labeled. It's about making them pursue actual crimes, to focus on likely threats instead of a black person who's driving a car that's "too nice" (yes, that happens). Of course officers have to use their judgment, but they should be held to a high standard and held accountable for misuses of power.
 
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#22
Militarization of police is a real thing but I'd like to point out most soldiers never see combat. The nerd in the drone operation van has killed more enemies than a room of marines.
Ok which is just a more severe desensitization to killing

If a soldier sees combat or not won’t mitigate the mindset made up through a lifetime of school and combat training. That doesn’t just turn off. Not to mention cops are giving a similar type of training
 
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Oh yeah? Please share the statistics on police brutality that inform your opinion. Thanks!
I don't have much of a strong opinion either way on the topic but I thought it was pretty funny that you felt the need to ask for stats from this one post but not the entire premise the thread is built on. It probably means nothing but an amusing observation regardless.
 
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I don't have much of a strong opinion either way on the topic but I thought it was pretty funny that you felt the need to ask for stats from this one post but not the entire premise the thread is built on. It probably means nothing but an amusing observation regardless.
Why would I ask for data from someone whose opinion I mostly agree with? I've already seen the statistics that validate what I think....
 
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#27
It is a hard, dangerous job that for the most part is thankless, we're lucky anybody will do it.
You’re absolutely right, and what you say is part of the problem (in my eyes).

It’s a hard, life threatening, thankless, under-paid position. You’re basically walking around with a target on your back at all times. We are lucky anyone would do it.

It also happens to carry the burden of being responsible for lethal discretion.

That’s a tough mix, as far as “anyone” doing it.

I’m thankful for the vast majority of great, dedicated, law enforcement personnel. It’s just a shame when, due to the nature of the job, that one bad apple can cause such irreparable harm.
 
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Fuck that's funny. I better tell all my friends to stay indoors. Wouldn't want to fall victim to the dangers of The City.
Chicago wasn't affectionately called Chi-raq for it's low crime and murder rate. I read there are more homicides in Chicago than all the Iraq and Afgan war casualties combined.

Not all of Chicago is bad mind you, I hear the north side, where Obama usually hang out, is pretty upscale and wealthy. The rest of the city is pretty much blight and needs to be pressured washed.
 
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Chicago wasn't affectionately called Chi-raq for it's low crime and murder rate. I read there are more homicides in Chicago than all the Iraq and Afgan war casualties combined.

Not all of Chicago is bad mind you, I hear the north side, where Obama usually hang out, is pretty upscale and wealthy. The rest of the city is pretty much blight and needs to be pressured washed.
Yeah just stay north of the business district “the loop” and you are fine. Everything up to Wrigley Field is all things you want to do anyway.

I think the police force does great. Pretty much you get 1 or 2 bad cops a month across the entire US. I consider that pretty good. I still can’t believe that lady shot the guy in his apartment though so crazy
 
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But it's not really working for the people if it enables systemic abuses of power, is it? The very problem black people complain about is that police use flimsy excuses to pull them over, question them, frisk them... there's actually a running 'joke' in the community about being stopped for "driving while black." You set the higher standard both to prevent these abuses and to avoid wasting officers' time.

And it's not about officers worrying about being labeled. It's about making them pursue actual crimes, to focus on likely threats instead of a black person who's driving a car that's "too nice" (yes, that happens). Of course officers have to use their judgment, but they should be held to a high standard and held accountable for misuses of power.
In this case, the solution is not preventing cops from pulling people over for any reason, it's hiring better cops, training them better, educating the ones you do have against these actions, and electing officials who hold those in the wrong accountable. A lot of people in power in this country can abuse their power in a variety of ways. I don't think the solution is taking away means to keep us safe, I think it's hiring and finding better people to do these jobs. If you have cops running around pulling people over repeatedly for no reasons and racially profiling others, then get rid of the cop and replace them with someone better. Don't prevent the good cops from not being able to act on these instincts who have good intentions of trying to prevent crime.
 
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#31
In my experience they tend to perfectly mirror the community. They do seem to lack training and conflict resolution skills in encounters, but that’s easy for me to say on the sidelines. Seems like a perfect job for robots.
 
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#32
What you call "bad vibe", our legal system call discretion. It's practically the lifeblood of the criminal justice system, used at all levels from the beat cop all the way up to the prosecutor in trial, to the judge in sentencing and to the probation after release. You sure have a very naive understanding of how the world works judging by how simple your problem solving abilities are.

Take away discretion and you're left with the grand result of Chicago, a crime ridden and dangerous city where law enforcement have basically gave up. If you are only seeking to be "morally" righteous, then consequences and aftermath are not important to you. I would argue such simplistic rationale are dangerous and should never be given a chance to implement in real life.

Police work for the people(who pay taxes), police do not work for illegal immigrants, gang members, bad guys. You forgot that important part.
Finally someone agree with me Chicago is in such sorry state because of take away discretion. Got to thanks Kim Foxx for that
 
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#33
Chicago wasn't affectionately called Chi-raq for it's low crime and murder rate. I read there are more homicides in Chicago than all the Iraq and Afgan war casualties combined.

Not all of Chicago is bad mind you, I hear the north side, where Obama usually hang out, is pretty upscale and wealthy. The rest of the city is pretty much blight and needs to be pressured washed.
In case you didn't hear... the string of Canadan Goose theft was from loop area and there was something at Chicago station a few weeks ago there a bunch of black try to beat soem kids up for their coat. No one in the city is safe because police are not allow to do their job.

In case people have no idea how bad the crime is in the city, take a look at this:

http://www.cwbchicago.com/

This report crimes in the city that major new network refuse to show.
 
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Ke0

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#34
If you ask me police are getting red tape too often. In my city, there were string of crime involving stealing Canada Goose coat the past few weeks. Police sighted suspect vehicle, a stolen BMW , and they were ordered to be call out when the chase happen .

Police need to be allowed to do what need to be done to keep the city safe, not oversights by civilian who doesn't even know the danger of the street nor the attorney general who keep releasing known criminal
Giving your police all that power without any oversight seems like a terrible idea.
 

appaws

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#35
The anti-cop agenda of groups like BLM and the ACLU is sputtering with the introduction of more widespread body cams.

They thought pushing for cameras would work in their favor and catch a lot of cops acting poorly, but the reality displayed of how the vast majority of cops do their work skillfully and professionally. Suddenly, body cams are a threat to "black and brown people."

Yeah just stay north of the business district “the loop” and you are fine. Everything up to Wrigley Field is all things you want to do anyway.
You gotta eat Ricobenes and Harold's Chicken. You gotta go south.
 
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#36
The anti-cop agenda of groups like BLM and the ACLU is sputtering with the introduction of more widespread body cams.

They thought pushing for cameras would work in their favor and catch a lot of cops acting poorly, but the reality displayed of how the vast majority of cops do their work skillfully and professionally. Suddenly, body cams are a threat to "black and brown people."



You gotta eat Ricobenes and Harold's Chicken. You gotta go south.
I'm only going to touch upon one thing...

Have you heard of cops turning off their body Cams or the body Cams being off "somehow" during a period where the only word you have is the cop's word?
 
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#37
The anti-cop agenda of groups like BLM and the ACLU is sputtering with the introduction of more widespread body cams.

They thought pushing for cameras would work in their favor and catch a lot of cops acting poorly, but the reality displayed of how the vast majority of cops do their work skillfully and professionally. Suddenly, body cams are a threat to "black and brown people."

You gotta eat Ricobenes and Harold's Chicken. You gotta go south.
This was already known, but there's still bad cops with body cam footage who still get off scott free. The system of unfairness and shielding goes deeper than cams into the courts and so on.

BLM has done a great job of making policing an issue, to which cities themselves have taken up the mantle on improving relations.
 
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#38
I'm only going to touch upon one thing...

Have you heard of cops turning off their body Cams or the body Cams being off "somehow" during a period where the only word you have is the cop's word?
Didn’t this happen when that guy was shot in his backyard while holding a cell phone? I think was the case where four cops start talking and one says “hey, you hot?” and the cam shuts off
 
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#43
Maybe there was a thread for this back when it happened and I need to look for it, but the case that really sticks in my head is that guy in Arizona who was raided in his hotel room and he’s crawling on the floor trying to obey the barking orders in the middle of this panic and chaos, crying and begging for his life, and these orders really don’t even make sense, and he makes the wrong motion and gets blown away.

The cop had “You’re Fucked” on his gun, if I recall.

He wasn’t convicted of any wrongdoing -as far as I know) and apparently that procedure was was completely in line with proper protocol (as far as I known).

I dunno man: that one was rough. In my soy, liberal eyes, it really looked like a guy looking for a reason to kill someone.


AGAIN, the vast majority of law enforcement are excellent, hard working, underpaid heroes.

It’s just that one in a million that leaves just a bad mark


Like some of these instructions contradict the others? If your hands come down we shoot you, now crawl toward us?
 
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#45
Maybe there was a thread for this back when it happened and I need to look for it, but the case that really sticks in my head is that guy in Arizona who was raided in his hotel room and he’s crawling on the floor trying to obey the barking orders in the middle of this panic and chaos, crying and begging for his life, and these orders really don’t even make sense, and he makes the wrong motion and gets blown away.

The cop had “You’re Fucked” on his gun, if I recall.

He wasn’t convicted of any wrongdoing and apparently that procedure was was completely in line with proper protocol. I dunno man: that one was rough. In my soy, liberal eyes, it really looked like a guy looking for a reason to kill someone.

That was indefensible what they did to that man. And "correct protocol"? How, Sway?
 
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#47
Are you seriously implying that the danger to "black folks in the hood" are cops? I really don't think you wanna go down that road.
Cops are very dangerous and intimidating towards everyone in the hood. There's a reason why relations get to where they have been. Cops wanna do their jobs, have seen a lot of bad shit, and over compensate for it. Bad cops get shielded.

As for the hoods dangers it's poverty because drugs and guns rise to the top and create the survival of the fittest mentality.
 
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#48
The anti-cop agenda of groups like BLM and the ACLU is sputtering with the introduction of more widespread body cams.

They thought pushing for cameras would work in their favor and catch a lot of cops acting poorly, but the reality displayed of how the vast majority of cops do their work skillfully and professionally. Suddenly, body cams are a threat to "black and brown people."



You gotta eat Ricobenes and Harold's Chicken. You gotta go south.
To be fair, Ricobene is probably one of the safest spot in the city give the police traffic in there. I do all my offerup and facebook sale there.
 
Aug 21, 2018
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#49
Cops are very dangerous and intimidating towards everyone in the hood. There's a reason why relations get to where they have been. Cops wanna do their jobs, have seen a lot of bad shit, and over compensate for it. Bad cops get shielded.

As for the hoods dangers it's poverty because drugs and guns rise to the top and create the survival of the fittest mentality.
Who can blame the police. Majority of the crime in the city are committed by you know who if you follow CWB. Does it sound racist, yes but it is also the truth. Remember whenever you saw gang shooting hitting bystander?? They never go protest at the hoods who the violent is. Chicago as a whole have gotten a whole lot more dangerous the past few years. Back in the days you can walk around pass midnight without much danger in my neigherhood.
 
Jan 12, 2009
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#50
Who can blame the police. Majority of the crime in the city are committed by you know who if you follow CWB. Does it sound racist, yes but it is also the truth. Remember whenever you saw gang shooting hitting bystander?? They never go protest at the hoods who the violent is. Chicago as a whole have gotten a whole lot more dangerous the past few years. Back in the days you can walk around pass midnight without much danger in my neigherhood.
The majority of the more potent crimes come from gang members, and idiots on drugs. It's not a ton of people, but they fuck shit up.

In a given poor neighborhood still the big majority of people aren't doing any kind of crime.

But the cops treat them as well as the same people they're after. The progress to correct that has been slow, but has accelerated a bit as we start to understand that more policing doesn't mean more results.

Btw Chicago has many kinds of grassroots programs aimed at stopping kids from joining gangs and things if that nature. But there needs to be a larger mobilization where as Chicago currently offers scraps.