Is it common to make big multi-topping sandwiches in the US?

Wait how is 4-6 slices of cheese and 4-6 slices of bread healthier than 2 slices of bread, 2 slices of cheese, meat, lettuce, tomato, mustard , and mayo? You got way too many carbs going on.
Oops, I meant all day. I take about 4-6 halves to work and eat a half whenever I'm hungry. Usually 8AM - 11AM - 1PM - 3PM
 

butzopower

proud of his butz
Another thing that keeps getting ignored is that it's not just the US that has these kinds of sandwiches. Basically all of North America and South America have these types of sandwiches, plus their own regional take on them. Vietnam has these types of sandwiches. I'm sure tons of other countries have these types of sandwiches. I know some god damn vegemite sandwich is gonna show up and no that's not a sandwich, sorry Australia. This isn't Americans misunderstanding Europe. This isn't America not having fresh ingredients. This is Europe not appreciating the sandwich and not willing to contribute like the rest of the world to probably the only thing that ultimately matters.
 
Another thing that keeps getting ignored is that it's not just the US that has these kinds of sandwiches. Basically all of North America and South America have these types of sandwiches, plus their own regional take on them. Vietnam has these types of sandwiches. I'm sure tons of other countries have these types of sandwiches. I know some god damn vegemite sandwich is gonna show up and no that's not a sandwich. This isn't Americans misunderstanding Europe. This isn't America not having fresh ingredients. This is Europe not appreciating the sandwich and not willing to contribute like the rest of the world to probably the only thing that ultimately matters.
Vietnam brought us banh mi sandwiches, and for that I am eternally grateful. The local bakery (an xuyen) has 10" long loaf sandwiches for $3. Three fucking dollars for a perfect sandwich.
 
Everyone? It doesn't matter what you "believe", because it's....a fact.

Carbohydrates (ie bread and sugar), are converted in your body to the same thing: glucose. It doesn't matter if it comes from sugar or a slice of bread. It's literally the same thing wrapped in a different package.

This in turn raises your blood sugar which is toxic to your body. Then insulin comes out to deal with this excess blood sugar, storing it as fat in your cells, making you fat. So there's a bunch of negative things happening at once.

I don't know why this seems to be nonintuitive for people. Maybe because they've been told growing up that bread (grains) are healthy for some reason and you're now anchored to that belief?

http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/carbohydrates/carbohydrates-and-blood-sugar/
This is such a braindead summation of metabolism, I don't know where to start.
 
Everyone? It doesn't matter what you "believe", because it's....a fact.

Carbohydrates (ie bread and sugar), are converted in your body to the same thing: glucose. It doesn't matter if it comes from sugar or a slice of bread. It's literally the same thing wrapped in a different package.

This in turn raises your blood sugar which is toxic to your body. Then insulin comes out to deal with this excess blood sugar, storing it as fat in your cells, making you fat. So there's a bunch of negative things happening at once.

I don't know why this seems to be nonintuitive for people. Maybe because they've been told growing up that bread (grains) are healthy for some reason and you're now anchored to that belief?

http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/carbohydrates/carbohydrates-and-blood-sugar/
That's oversimplifying it to the point of nonsense. Sure, refined wheat is not much better than sugar, but low glycemic index carbs with high fibre count is health food compared to almost anything.
 
I didn't even realize that my breakfasts are so Scandinavian. I'd feel right at home up there. My usual breakfast consists of some yoghurt and bread with cheese and/or ham, like this:




I also often eat buns instead of bread:
That does look pretty typically Scandinavian actually, but most people over here would probably eat the bun as two halves rather than putting them together.
 
Another thing that keeps getting ignored is that it's not just the US that has these kinds of sandwiches.
lol indeed, even the Asians are beating Europe at the sandwich game and we got it from ya'll!


Taiwanese breakfast sandwiches


HK Pork Chop Bo Lo Bao


Banh Mi


Yakisoba bread


Katsu Sando


Roti john
 
This thread makes me want to make a sandwich that consists of 1/4lbs of honey baked ham or turkey on some nice honey white bread for lunch tomorrow in honor of sandwich and Christmas.
 

Is a meatball sub sandwich too much for Europeans to handle? It's only the greatest food item ever devised. The one in the pic needs a good dusting of parmesan.
I'm seeing something in this sandwich, the new billion dollar idea. Boneless wing + sandwich = so cash

Edit: no wait people already make those :(