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Jailing Muslims, burning Bibles, and forcing monks to wave the national flag: How Xi Jinping is attacking religion in China

TheShadowLord

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https://www.businessinsider.com/how-xi-jinping-is-attacking-religion-in-china-2018-11

China is waging an unprecedented war on religion.

Over the past year alone, China has detained Muslims because of their faith, forced Buddhists to pledge allegiance to the Chinese Communist Party, and coerced Christian churches to take down their crosses or shut down.

The sinicization of religion
The Party, which is officially atheist, has for decades attempted to control religious organizations to maintain its dominance.

Its State Administration for Religious Affairs, set up in 1951, allows five religious organizations to exist under the state's control: a Party-sanctioned form of Buddhism, Taoism, Islam, Protestantism, and Catholicism.

The state controls these groups' personnel, publications, and finances. Technically, citizens are free to practise religion freely, as long as their sect is officially sanctioned by the government.

Party officials in 2015 introduced the term "sinicization" into official government lexicon, in which they called on Muslim, Buddhist, and Christian leaders to fuse their religions with Chinese socialist thought.

But under the presidency of Xi Jinping, the government's crackdown appears to have increased at an alarming scale.

'They want to ... cut off Islam at the roots'
In the western region of Xinjiang, the home of the majority-Muslim Uighur ethnic minority, authorities have installed a massive police state and reportedly imprisoned up to 1 million Uighurs.

Many detainees said they were arrested for showing distinct markers of Islam, like wearing a veil or growing a long beard.

The majority-Muslim Hui people, who are scattered around China, also fear that the government will extend its crackdown to them.

In the northern city of Yinchuan, home to the largest concentration of Hui Muslims in the country, authorities have banned the daily call to prayer because it apparently created noise pollution, the South China Morning Post reported.

Monks raising the flag
Buddhism and Taoism — which has historically deeper roots in East Asia — is not exempt either.

China restricts religious operations in Tibet, and spiritual leader the Dalai Lama remains in exile. Activists say the state monitors the daily activities of major Tibetan monasteries, limits believers' travel and communications, and has routinely detained monks on terrorism charges— not dissimilar from the situation in Xinjiang.

Earlier this year, China's famous Shaolin Temple — an ancient Buddhist monastery believed to be the birth place of kung fu — raised the Chinese national flag for the first time in its 1,500-year history as part of a government campaign to demonstrate its patriotism.

Monitored services, censored sermons
The crackdown extends beyond Islam.

Authorities have also targeted Christians outside the state-sanctioned Catholic and Protestant associations by burning Bibles, shutting down churches, and ordering people to renounce their faith, the Associated Press reported.

Some churches allowed to remain open have to install facial-recognition cameras in the building, or risk getting shut down. Party officials censor and add state propaganda to pastors' sermons, Bob Fu, who runs the US rights group ChinaAid, told France24.

In September, authorities in China and the Vatican signed an agreement in which Pope Francis officially recognized seven Beijing-appointed bishops, who had been excommunicated because they weren't approved by the Holy See. Critics said the deal ceded power from the Holy See to the Communist Party.

'No other source of moral or social authority is tolerated'
The Communist Party, keen to maintain its sole grip on power, disapproves of all kinds of grassroots organizations as they are seen to undermine it and disrupt internal stability.

Wye, the former British Embassy official, said China's keenness to exert control over religions is also to limit foreign influence.

"This is part of the wider 'China dream' that Xi Jinping has, to make China big and strong again," he added.

"Whatever political and social development China will take in the future, it is to be decided and promulgated by the Chinese Communist Party, and no other source of moral or social authority is tolerated."
 

Blood Borne

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Leftist ideology can’t cohabit with other religions, that’s because Leftism is a religion even though its adherents will claim otherwise. It simply substitutes God with Government.
 
Aug 24, 2016
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China also has execution vans in certain parts of the country. Looking for strays, homeless, unlikable, or groups the party doesn't want around.

What I find interesting is them going after the monks, I'm assuming the Buddhist monks? Even North Korea didn't go after the monks, they still have monk temples there,.
 

cryptoadam

Banned
Feb 21, 2018
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CCP are modern day Nazi's.

Sure they make good cheap products and have taken their country from 3rd world to 1st world, but they are facist racist Nazi's.
 

Durask

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Feb 6, 2012
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Both SJWs and big business will ignore this - for obvious reasons.
 

infinitys_7th

Gold Member
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Both SJWs and big business will ignore this - for obvious reasons.

SJWs already support Chinese oppression - all the otherkin at Google had no problem helping the party censor information, but had moral issues with helping improve drones to prevent civilian casualties.
 

Hotspurr

Banned
Jan 27, 2018
1,267
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Religion is basically intellectual cancer. Communism is almost as bad. This is a win lose situation I guess?
 

cryptoadam

Banned
Feb 21, 2018
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As a leftist...I don't support China..but it seems some people in this thread think I do?

Well the left was pro china during the Mao years, and I mean the real left as in Marxist/Communist left, same guys who were pro Russian in that era.

I think in more recent times its because of the double standard shown by the left. A company like Google that had to have a company wide meeting after Trump being elected is willing to censor its search to get into China. Lots of attention given to causes like migration to EU, Israel or whatever that the left goes on and on about, while they never say anything about China. And finally the left, were pretty much cheering on China against Trumps tariffs. Even if Tariffs aren't sanctions they hurt CCP economically. And Trump did slap on military sanctions on China, even though its more related to Russia, but again hurting the CCP.

And the above does apply to the right as well. Frankly everyone is cozy with China, and most people don't care to try and do anything to China because they know it means more expensive goods and right or left we generally think about our own bottom lines.
 

Wings 嫩翼翻せ

so it's not nice
Apr 2, 2013
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Just goes to show you what really is going on within the CCP under Winnie the Pooh's rule. There is a clear delineation China is undergoing from what it was not even 10 years ago (though still a communist country) and the enforcing of nationalist sentiments are only having negative affects as a whole. Going to be interesting to see how his (maybe) life-term will turn out. All eyes on him.

Or, really, given the fact that facial-recognition technology is becoming more commonplace as we speak, there is no mistake that simply stepping outside will be a detriment in the Chinese lifestyle, unless you are a nationalist dummy.
 

Darkking2001

Banned
Jul 5, 2018
481
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Well the left was pro china during the Mao years, and I mean the real left as in Marxist/Communist left, same guys who were pro Russian in that era.

I think in more recent times its because of the double standard shown by the left. A company like Google that had to have a company wide meeting after Trump being elected is willing to censor its search to get into China. Lots of attention given to causes like migration to EU, Israel or whatever that the left goes on and on about, while they never say anything about China. And finally the left, were pretty much cheering on China against Trumps tariffs. Even if Tariffs aren't sanctions they hurt CCP economically. And Trump did slap on military sanctions on China, even though its more related to Russia, but again hurting the CCP.

And the above does apply to the right as well. Frankly everyone is cozy with China, and most people don't care to try and do anything to China because they know it means more expensive goods and right or left we generally think about our own bottom lines.

Just one thing I'd like to correct you on....the left weren't cheering against Trump...they were worried for the impact on their own economy...very different thing
 

HenkDV

Banned
Aug 11, 2018
737
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As a leftist...I don't support China..but it seems some people in this thread think I do?
Didn't you know that saying the US shouldn't start a trade war with China you means you fucking *love* everything about that country? Also something with communism apparently?
 

Darkking2001

Banned
Jul 5, 2018
481
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Didn't you know that saying the US shouldn't start a trade war with China you means you fucking *love* everything about that country? Also something with communism apparently?

China isn't even really communist anymore. CCP is just a facist dicatorship that managed to make a lot of money.

Another part of Slick Willy's great foreign policy legacy.

To be fair he didn't
 
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Sub_Level

wants to fuck an Asian grill.
Apr 9, 2009
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Right wingers will be taking notes on how they too can impede Islam.
 

cryptoadam

Banned
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To be fair he didn't

He opened the door for China to get onto the international stage and the WTO, even against labor unions and human rights groups.

You don't have Bill signing in the China Trade Bill and China probably doesn't get into the WTO nor rise as fast as it did (and basically screw a huge portion of the US economy)

Kinda a funny article from ABC news from back then. Prophetic almost

Approved by the U.S. Senate in September and the House of Representatives in May over stiff opposition from labor and human rights groups, the legislation ends the 20-year-old annual ritual of reviewing China’s trade status and guarantees Chinese goods the same low-tariff access to the U.S. market as products from nearly every other nation.

WTO Controversy In exchange for permanent U.S. trade benefits, China agreed to open a wide range of markets — from agriculture to telecommunications — under terms of a landmark agreement the White House hoped would usher Beijing into the World Trade Organization (WTO) later this year.

But U.S. and European trade officials warned that China’s bid to enter the WTO this year was in peril after talks in Geneva stalled over how Beijing would implement WTO rules on intellectual property and meet its other obligations.

Ya wonder how those concerns over IP and other obligations went LOL.

If this Bill never passed China wouldn't be the economic monster it is today and the world could stand up to it and do something in regards to its human rights violations. But because everyone wants a piece of China no one is going to say a word. I guess the US was in that position for many years so its fitting that they would be the ones to pass that power onto the CCP.
 

Hypnotoad

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One of the first things you notice in China - if you don't visit one of the places frequented by tourists - is how devoid of any spirituality and thought the place is. The first city I lived in has around 500.000 people living in its urban core. Yet not a single official place of worship to be found anywhere - no temple, no church, no mosque, nothing. At the time, the whole city didn't even have a public library. It has a museum, but that was closed all year around. And one of those 'city planning' exhibition halls that many Chinese cities have. Many of my foreign collegues got depressed pretty fast, because there outside of going to a restaurant or some really bad bars, they didn't have anything to do.

What the city did have though - and that is true of many places - is a vibrant underground Evangelical Christian mission and house churches. In fact, several teachers working at local colleges were (and I suppose might still be to this day) actually sent by Christian organizations from the US to win over those Chinese souls. And they are moderately successful at it. This was known by the school authorities.

Now that I live in Shanghai, it is pretty much the same, albeit it on different scales. I know more Chinese here who are Christians than those who adhere to local Chinese traditions - in fact just one girl who is into Confucian stuff, and that's it. But several others are into quite questionable Christian underground churches. And damn, do they hate the CCP. As far as local traditions are concerned, it is the same: outside of the touristy temples, mostly frequented to take pictures, and some impressive Churches from the time of the Foreign concessions, this city of over 20 million people is utterly devoid of religion. Young people talk about money they don't have and dream about apartments which they are unlikely to afford. And most do indeed feel quite empty and shallow. They work, eat and go home. And spend around 6-8 hours a day on their phone. Or go to the temples of modern China, the malls. That's their life.

Compare that to Taiwan, where temples, churces and other religious places are everywhere. And still frequented by young people, even if it is just for the sake of tradition. But it is no exagerration to say that a small town in Taiwan has more places of worship than Chinese mega-cities one hundred times their size. Same goes for Hong Kong.

No Emperor Winnie is not content with that - especially since Christianity is on the rise. Aparrently, the party is planning a 'sinicized' version of the bible. And already cracking down hard on official as well as underground churces. Not to mention what is happening in the Western Provinces, where most mosques are already closed or heavily monitored. The saddest part though is that indigenous Chinese folk religion is dead and only survives as an empty shell to lure domestic and foreign tourists.
 
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Darkking2001

Banned
Jul 5, 2018
481
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He opened the door for China to get onto the international stage and the WTO, even against labor unions and human rights groups.

You don't have Bill signing in the China Trade Bill and China probably doesn't get into the WTO nor rise as fast as it did (and basically screw a huge portion of the US economy)

Kinda a funny article from ABC news from back then. Prophetic almost



Ya wonder how those concerns over IP and other obligations went LOL.

If this Bill never passed China wouldn't be the economic monster it is today and the world could stand up to it and do something in regards to its human rights violations. But because everyone wants a piece of China no one is going to say a word. I guess the US was in that position for many years so its fitting that they would be the ones to pass that power onto the CCP.

It's kinda an issue with globalism...it might make massive wars less likely...but it acts like a shield for dictators who mistreat their civilians
Edit: oh I see the mistake you made...I was saying that you didn't try to use communism as a cheap shot towards the left...cause I though HenkDV was quoting my latest post up to that point. and interjecting your intent.
Not that Bill didn't...silly misunderstanding sorry, didn't make it clear enough
 
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Wings 嫩翼翻せ

so it's not nice
Apr 2, 2013
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One of the first things you notice in China - if you don't visit one of the places frequented by tourists - is how devoid of any spirituality and thought the place is. The first city I lived in has around 500.000 people living in its urban core. Yet not a single official place of worship to be found anywhere - no temple, no church, no mosque, nothing. At the time, the whole city didn't even have a public library. It has a museum, but that was closed all year around. And one of those 'city planning' exhibition halls that many Chinese cities have. Many of my foreign collegues got depressed pretty fast, because there outside of going to a restaurant or some really bad bars, they didn't have anything to do.

What the city did have though - and that is true of many places - is a vibrant underground Evangelical Christian mission and house churches. In fact, several teachers working at local colleges were (and I suppose might still be to this day) actually sent by Christian organizations from the US to win over those Chinese souls. And they are moderately successful at it. This was known by the school authorities.

Now that I live in Shanghai, it is pretty much the same, albeit it on different scales. I know more Chinese here who are Christians than those who adhere to local Chinese traditions - in fact just one girl who is into Confucian stuff, and that's it. But several others are into quite questionable Christian underground churches. And damn, do they hate the CCP. As far as local traditions are concerned, it is the same: outside of the touristy temples, mostly frequented to take pictures, and some impressive Churches from the time of the Foreign concessions, this city of over 20 million people is utterly devoid of religion. Young people talk about money they don't have and dream about apartments which they are unlikely to afford. And most do indeed feel quite empty and shallow. They work, eat and go home. And spend around 6-8 hours a day on their phone. Or go to the temples of modern China, the malls. That's their life.

Compare that to Taiwan, where temples, churces and other religious places are everywhere. And still frequented by young people, even if it is just for the sake of tradition. But it is no exagerration to say that a small town in Taiwan has more places of worship than Chinese mega-cities one hundred times their size. Same goes for Hong Kong.

No Emperor Winnie is not content with that - especially since Christianity is on the rise. Aparrently, the party is planning a 'sinicized' version of the bible. And already cracking down hard on official as well as underground churces. Not to mention what is happening in the Western Provinces, where most mosques are already closed or heavily monitored. The saddest part though is that indigenous Chinese folk religion is dead and only survives as an empty shell to lure domestic and foreign tourists.

Yeah I am aware of this, too. Those Christian Chinese sound like [they would be] delightful company.
 
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DunDunDunpachi

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Apr 18, 2018
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The history on how the Soviets purged the Orthodox churches is well-documented. China's government is just following in Daddy Stalin's footsteps.
 

TrainedRage

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Feb 3, 2018
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Nah, TrainedNPC did
Ok I laughed.

But it was a joke. Just pointing out how most governments hide under the guise of communism while kids with no real understanding of communism praise the ideals. I don't really think there has been anything resembling communism in the real world. It just isn't feasible.
 
D

Deleted member 77995

Unconfirmed Member
Ok I laughed.

But it was a joke. Just pointing out how most governments hide under the guise of communism while kids with no real understanding of communism praise the ideals. I don't really think there has been anything resembling communism in the real world. It just isn't feasible.
Maybe when AI gets here
 

Bolivar687

Banned
Jun 13, 2014
7,264
7,842
800
USA
One of the first things you notice in China - if you don't visit one of the places frequented by tourists - is how devoid of any spirituality and thought the place is. The first city I lived in has around 500.000 people living in its urban core. Yet not a single official place of worship to be found anywhere - no temple, no church, no mosque, nothing. At the time, the whole city didn't even have a public library. It has a museum, but that was closed all year around. And one of those 'city planning' exhibition halls that many Chinese cities have. Many of my foreign collegues got depressed pretty fast, because there outside of going to a restaurant or some really bad bars, they didn't have anything to do.

What the city did have though - and that is true of many places - is a vibrant underground Evangelical Christian mission and house churches. In fact, several teachers working at local colleges were (and I suppose might still be to this day) actually sent by Christian organizations from the US to win over those Chinese souls. And they are moderately successful at it. This was known by the school authorities.

Now that I live in Shanghai, it is pretty much the same, albeit it on different scales. I know more Chinese here who are Christians than those who adhere to local Chinese traditions - in fact just one girl who is into Confucian stuff, and that's it. But several others are into quite questionable Christian underground churches. And damn, do they hate the CCP. As far as local traditions are concerned, it is the same: outside of the touristy temples, mostly frequented to take pictures, and some impressive Churches from the time of the Foreign concessions, this city of over 20 million people is utterly devoid of religion. Young people talk about money they don't have and dream about apartments which they are unlikely to afford. And most do indeed feel quite empty and shallow. They work, eat and go home. And spend around 6-8 hours a day on their phone. Or go to the temples of modern China, the malls. That's their life.

Compare that to Taiwan, where temples, churces and other religious places are everywhere. And still frequented by young people, even if it is just for the sake of tradition. But it is no exagerration to say that a small town in Taiwan has more places of worship than Chinese mega-cities one hundred times their size. Same goes for Hong Kong.

No Emperor Winnie is not content with that - especially since Christianity is on the rise. Aparrently, the party is planning a 'sinicized' version of the bible. And already cracking down hard on official as well as underground churces. Not to mention what is happening in the Western Provinces, where most mosques are already closed or heavily monitored. The saddest part though is that indigenous Chinese folk religion is dead and only survives as an empty shell to lure domestic and foreign tourists.

I celebrated Easter in Taiwan at a Catholic parish right around the corner from where I was staying. The liturgy was orthodox and the people were just so welcoming and accommodating. I was absolutely blown away by the religious scene in Taiwan, where it is very much a part of everyday public life.

Everything we hear about the mainland's hostility to religion is so sickening but thankfully Taiwan is a vigilant caretaker of Chinese spirituality (as with so much else).
 

Hypnotoad

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Might as well post this here, since the photojournalist in question was traveling in Urumqi, Xinjiang, before he was 'disappeared'.

https://www.boredpanda.com/award-wi...oogle&utm_medium=organic&utm_campaign=organic

Lu Guang’s photos have exposed the sides of China that its government isn’t keen on talking about: drug addicts, HIV patients, environmental problems, and so on. This time, however, the award-winning photographer has himself become the center of a story. His wife Xu Xiaoli claims she hasn’t heard from her husband since the 3rd of November.

On 23rd October, Guang flew to Urumqi, the capital of Xinjiang region, where he had planned to attend some photography events. Later, he was to fly to Sichuan to meet his friend Mr Chen to participate in a charity event. But Mr Chen was unable to find or contact the photographer.

Photos in the article - but be warned, not for the faint-hearted. Parts of rural China are dystopia incarnate.
 

cryptoadam

Banned
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Might as well post this here, since the photojournalist in question was traveling in Urumqi, Xinjiang, before he was 'disappeared'.

https://www.boredpanda.com/award-wi...oogle&utm_medium=organic&utm_campaign=organic



Photos in the article - but be warned, not for the faint-hearted. Parts of rural China are dystopia incarnate.

Xi learning from his good buddy MBS. This time probably won't do it in a consulate in a foreign country though.

Those pictures were rough.
 

Wings 嫩翼翻せ

so it's not nice
Apr 2, 2013
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Yeah from the "disappearance" of 范冰冰 (Fan Bingbing) I understand that most of these outlawed Chinese are better off not messing with Winnie. Some are getting it, though.
 

Nelsin

Banned
Nov 21, 2018
236
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280
Pure garbage.

The saddest part you dont sjw "defending on media" and spread the news like they did with khashoggi for months.

SJWs my ass.
 
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Yoshi

Headmaster of Console Warrior Jugendstrafanstalt
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Is it really worse than the treatment in the USSR? Appears to be pretty much the same.

Anyway, as someone strongly rejecting all religion, the right and freedom to believe whatever bullshit you want to believe and to live accordingly, as long as you harm no one else is a fundamental one. The state may finance education programmes to combat superstition, but restricting the people in the expression of their beliefs is wrong. On the other hand, Chinese governement restricts all kinds of human rights, including having opposing political opinions, and is establishing a police state that sounds a lot like Orwell's "vision", so this is merely one of many issues, and not the primary one with China for me.
 

Tapioca

Banned
Aug 17, 2017
521
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Why do people think that SJW's like China? Old neo-gaf and Resetera had threads shitting on China's treatment of their Muslims and other human rights problems. I don't think I've heard any SJW ever praise China. China is pretty much everything an SJW hates. It's largely nationalist, racist, xenophobic, anti-religion, patriarchal, anti-gay, anti-disabled, anti-animal rights, anti-multiculturalism, etc..

To try and describe google as SJW is just dumb. It's a corporation and corporations are set up to make money for their investors. Google isn't going to give up on the Chinese market.

And China isn't communist. It is literally full of small businesses and huge corporations. It's a capitalist country with an authoritarian, shitty, one-party government. Capitalism does not equate to freedom or a non-shit government.
 

Nelsin

Banned
Nov 21, 2018
236
152
280
Why do people think that SJW's like China? Old neo-gaf and Resetera had threads shitting on China's treatment of their Muslims and other human rights problems. I don't think I've heard any SJW ever praise China. China is pretty much everything an SJW hates. It's largely nationalist, racist, xenophobic, anti-religion, patriarchal, anti-gay, anti-disabled, anti-animal rights, anti-multiculturalism, etc..
Im not talking about gaming forums they dont represent even 1% of social media SJWs im talking about reddit and twitter they have been literally shitting on saudi arabia for months because of the killing of journalist. Now china jailing MILLIONS of people and talking their homes and you dont see SJWs even bet an eye.

You can clearly see them taking sides.

Since its religious people getting fucked they didnt mind it. Now imaging its the minority. You would see shitstorms everywhere even in unrelated places
 
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Wings 嫩翼翻せ

so it's not nice
Apr 2, 2013
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Since its religious people getting fucked they didnt mind it. Now imaging its the minority. You would see shitstorms everywhere even in unrelated places

Ya know, I for one don't think religious people should be ignored when facing opposition that causes arrests and deaths strictly for their faith. It seems most people in these categories either "do not care" or do not see it as an equally pressing issue.