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|OT| Social Joe Rogan's Podcast |OT|

Maiden Voyage

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Steven Rinella is an outdoorsman, author, and television personality. He currently hosts MeatEater, available on the Sportsman Channel and Netflix, as well as the MeatEater podcast. His new book The MeatEater Guide to Wilderness Skills and Survival is available on December 1. @MeatEater
 

TrainedRage

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Steven Rinella is an outdoorsman, author, and television personality. He currently hosts MeatEater, available on the Sportsman Channel and Netflix, as well as the MeatEater podcast. His new book The MeatEater Guide to Wilderness Skills and Survival is available on December 1. @MeatEater
Eh, I think I’m good with the hunting stuff for a while. Unless they veer off that topic I will wait for the next one.
 

DragoonKain

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Nov 13, 2013
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2 weeks left of Rogan on Youtube and Apple podcasts.

Funny today on Youtube I saw a Spotify ad today advertising Spotify's Dec. 1st exclusivity.
 
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DragoonKain

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Nick Christakis was recorded today, should be released Wed. or Thurs. They are gonna talk more COVID. We'll see what he says. The first time Joe had him on Joe was freaking out it was really early in the going of COVID back in like March. Now Joe is tired of all the lockdowns so we'll see how it goes, because Christakis is very pro lockdown.
 
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Erdrick

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Listening to the Nick Christakis one atm, an hour into it. Gotta say, this one is holding my attention much more than I expected. Dude is very well informed and comes off as being able to back up his statements. Quite fascinating to listen to. The fact that I haven't looked at how much time is left is telling to how interested I am in this topic.
 

manfestival

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Oh man I gotta watch the latest one for sure!
I watched some of the one from yesterday. I didn't really like the way the guy was talking. Though I like how Joe unintentionally got him on the facemask aerosol protection being pointless for the vast majority of masks(obviously non rated ones... which is most).
 

Calcium

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Chapelle and Rawlings should be a great show. Glad they got this one in before the Spotify exclusivity.
 

Zefah

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Chapelle and Rawlings should be a great show. Glad they got this one in before the Spotify exclusivity.

Ah, shit. When does that go into effect?

Does it only apply to new episodes, or will Joe's stuff be removed from YouTube?
 
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Erdrick

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Tomorrow begins the final week countdown of Rogan on Youtube.

I've actually taken to just downloading from his site and listening to them while doing other stuff since I really got into the show over this whole lockdown business around March this year, so that won't change too much for myself, but...

I guess I need to sign up for a Spotify account soon. Bleh.

About 3 1/2 hours into the Tom Green one, and it's been pretty good given that it is almost 5 hours... Sure, they're both getting gradually hammered, but it's definitely not boring. Been a fan of Green since seeing him up here in the late 90's. Good to see he's doing well.
 

DragoonKain

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Joe’s had some good guests and spurts here and there, but I gotta be honest, I think the quality has declined since the move to Texas. I just don’t like the guests as much. In LA he had access to so many more interesting people, people always drop by in LA and can be guests on the show, so the possibilities were endless. But in Texas I find so many of them boring. Since many people probably don’t want to fly out because of COVID, the really good guests need to be done remotely and while it’s still good, it’s just not the same as being there with him. The awkward pauses, making sure one doesn’t interrupt another.

but the guests he does get in studio, so many of them don’t interest me. I miss the episodes where his friends in LA would drop by and they’d shoot the shit and get silly for 3 hours and talk about life and current events and tell stories. You don’t get much of that since the Texas move.
 

Maiden Voyage

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"Rock climber and adventurer Emily Harrington is a five-time US National Champion in Sport Climbing. She has scaled some of the world's most formidable mountains, including Everest, Ama Dablam, and Cho Oyu, and is the first woman to free climb El Capitan via Golden Gate in under 24 hours."

The shit she did is insane. I saw the story and immediately hoped she would be on Rogan. Wish come true.


 
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Maiden Voyage

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Anyone looking for a good article to get their blood flowing, here's an older article (2015) about climbing Mt Hkakabo Razi in Myanmar, featuring Emily.



Some highlights below.

On the dangerous nature of mountains:
Still, Keith and I continued doing expeditions and often ice climbed together. On January 2, 2009, we were on the fifth pitch of an icefall in north Wyoming. I was belaying him from a small alcove in the ice. He was cheerfully climbing 15 feet below me when we heard a deafening roar. A section of ice above us had cut loose. Seconds later tons of ice crashed down. Keith was killed, his neck broken by the impact.
There was no reason why I lived and Keith died. We’d taken the safety precautions. He didn’t do anything wrong, and I didn’t do anything to save myself. There was no moral, aside from the inescapable truth that mountains are dangerous, and occasionally inflict horror and sorrow on those who dare to climb them.

On the dangers within the jungle, which needed to be traversed before even seeing the mountain:
On the first day trekking in the jungle Hilaree was almost struck by a snake. She saw it coiled on the trail at the last moment and leaped over it. Poised to strike, the serpent’s flat head floated side to side, its black tongue squirting in and out. We all kept our distance except Cory, who knelt down and began snapping photos. “White-lipped pit viper,” he declared.
It was one of a dozen snakes toxinologist Zoltan Takacs had warned us about before we came to Myanmar. If one of us were bitten, the venom could cause bleeding from the nose, eyes, gums, and rectum and could be fatal. We carried two antivenoms, one for vipers, the other for cobras and kraits, but Takacs had warned us that relying on antivenom in the jungle was dicey.
Far less dangerous were the leeches. They would drop down onto our necks as we pushed through wet branches or suck onto our feet and legs during stream crossings. All day we’d pluck their blood-engorged bodies off our skin, leaving bites that didn’t fully heal for weeks.
And then there were the spiders. We continually pushed through cobwebs the size of fishing nets. Some held spiders baring fangs so large they were visible from a few feet away.
The Rawang were not immune to the vagaries of the jungle. In one village a distraught mother brought a screaming child to us, her tiny body swollen from infected bites. Hilaree and Emily smeared antibiotic cream on her arms, legs, and face. When I asked what would become of the child, a tribal elder told me, “Everyone here either gets better on their own or dies.”

On the path up the mountain and the struggles therein:
Hkakabo’s west ridge is a two-mile-long saw blade—a series of stone towers separated by sharp cols of snow. Unlike on some mountains, where you can shoot right up to the summit, we have been climbing up and down the jagged ridgeline the whole way—up a tooth of rock, rappelling down the backside, balancing across a bridge of snow, then up the next craggy pinnacle. We try to identify a potential route, but the spiked ridge weaves like a serpent’s tail so we can’t see all the obstacles. We do, however, spot a notch that looks like the best location to bivouac for the night. We pack up and start moving, trying to stay on the sunny side of the ridge.
It takes us four hours to reach the notch. We are so fatigued that we can barely stomp out a tent platform. Our faces are rimed with ice from breathing so hard. While trying to shove the poles into our tent, the wind lifts it like a kite. We throw in our packs, guy it down, and pile inside.
We knew this night was going to be misery. At camp 3 we could see that the ridge became technical and treacherous. So we ruthlessly cut the weight of our packs, bringing only bare essentials, hoping it would be enough to get us to the top and back down. We left our winter sleeping bags and carried only the thin overbag shells. We have one stove, one fuel bottle, one pot, one spoon, two instant pasta meals, and the three of us are crammed into a two-person tent.
Sitting knee-to-knee, our backs pressed against the tent, we set our stove on our boots and nearly asphyxiate ourselves boiling water from snow. One person holds the stove, another the pot. We are wearing everything we have. Only our headlamps and runny noses stick out from beneath the hoods of our parkas. Renan says little, which is normal. But even Cory is quiet.
We have been sleeping with each other for weeks, like poor brothers in one bed. We know each other’s secrets. I know Renan is dealing with the betrayal of a friend. I know Cory’s struggling to stay married and be a world-traveling photographer. They know I’m haunted by memories of my dead friends, that this mountain is my white whale. My thoughts drift to how close we are to our goal and our team’s ugly fight and the toll it’s taken on my friendship with Hilaree.

On ego and the turmoil in slowly realizing they were unable to make it up:
That night, at camp 3, Renan and Cory both privately expressed concerns about climbing any farther with the entire team. We spent the next day in our tents acclimatizing, and there was no way around the painful conversation. In his soft-spoken way, Renan noted that the climbing was going to get more dangerous. It was also pointed out that three people moving fast had the best chance of summiting in the brief time we had left. Emily readily agreed that she was in over her head. But Hilaree was deeply offended and insisted that she should go for the summit. I explained it was an issue of safety for the whole team, but Hilaree was wounded. “I’m going to say one thing,” she said, her voice welling with emotion as she left the tent, “[Expletive] you, Mark, for the vote of confidence.”
Nothing is more damning in the mountains than hubris, yet hubris is fundamental to climbing mountains. All serious mountaineers possess big egos. You cannot take on the risks and constant suffering of big mountains without one. We may talk like Buddhists, but don’t be fooled, we’re actually narcissists—driven, single-minded, masochistic narcissists. Nearly all of us, on some mountain at some time, have defied logic and refused to turn around, as Hilaree was doing now. Some of us have been lucky enough to survive those misguided moments. This may sound harsh, but I’m at a season in my climbing career where openness and honesty trump polite silence, even with my friends.
We were all weary, light-headed from the thin air, and fearful of what lay ahead, and the conversations over the next hours devolved into shouting, accusations, and recriminations. Eventually, Cory couldn’t stand the rancor and said Hilaree could take his place on the summit team. Renan and I were concerned but reluctantly agreed to the new plan.

Worth the read if you like adventure.
 
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TTOOLL

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December 1st is upon us guys. Spotify has been pretty unreliable for me so far when I tried to watch the podcast over there. I hope they improve the experience and give us an audio-only option.
 

hariseldon

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Aug 22, 2018
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He has to if he wants people to spend 2-4 hours in the studio with him.
Yep - it’s covering his ass. Also it’s respecting people’s choices - he has an opinion but makes every effort to ensure that those who disagree aren’t made to feel unsafe.
 
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Rien

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December 1st is upon us guys. Spotify has been pretty unreliable for me so far when I tried to watch the podcast over there. I hope they improve the experience and give us an audio-only option.

I hope as well. I dropped my Apple Music sub for Spotify just for his content but I would like to have an audio only function which I can download at home

edit:

when I play some of his podcasts and I use screenlock it keeps on playing. Guess that’s good enough for now
 
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